Archives for talent community

Smart Civics, Higher Citizenship – Answer The Call To Conscious Leadership

Observations across diverse populations indicate that while we need to be getting better at having hard conversations about change, we are, unfortunately, getting worse. As a result, change initiatives are stalling and issues are festering, causing turnover and instability that threatens productivity and profits. Even worse, those who feel unheard can end up resorting to more extreme measures.

That is why our discussion during last week’s event on Smart Civics, Higher Citizenship was so important. The two panelists who joined us have both developed programs that move communities and organizations past the barriers that have been stifling progress, innovation, and social and racial justice, among other societal threats.

Doc Cunningham is Founder of See America In Color, Social Commentator, and Civic Advisor. He facilitates civic discussions in communities and brings new vibrancy and dimension to inequities so that the gaps become more obvious, encouraging more people to become a part of the solution.

Michael Taylor is Principal and Co-Founder of SchellingPoint, who brings research and a tech-driven approach to aligning people with a common purpose to take action and move in the desired direction.

Join the C3 community now to access the replay!

Here is just some of what we covered:

  • What are the gaps in conventional change management that produce lackluster progress?
  • What is the central frame of change that has led to a more sustainable impact?
  • In order to create coordination action, what do we first have to determine to inform that action?
  • What must you do before you associate a root cause of issues originating with an executive leader?
  • How do you get a group of thought leaders and experts to yield their ego, agree on a plan, and follow through?
  • How do fundamental disconnects on core beliefs sabotage collaborative change efforts and what can be done about it?
  • What are the three triggers of executive action?
  • How can you shift division about whether change is necessary or not? Furthermore, how can you engage or re-engage leadership in decisions around that change that lead to some degree of change?
  • How and why do we want to turn pain into possibility?
  • What are the breakthroughs in behavioral science that have helped to develop the alignment cycle?
  • What are the 5 things a group needs to commit to or reject before they are aligned in action?
  • How can we reconcile the diverse ways analysis can be interpreted?
  • How can you alleviate some resistance to change?

Chances are if you are reading this, there is some change you would like to see. If you are accountable and the progress, or probable progress, discourages you, I highly recommend reaching out to SchellingPoint. Also, contact Doc about his civics programs that “help society lessen the impact of partisan hang-ups and social flare-ups.”

Remember to tune in to our second Answer The Call to Conscious Leadership event this month on Unconscious Bias hosted by TaJuanna Taylor and Carl Shawn Watkins. As always, details on how to attend the live discussion will be shared with you inside of C3.

Last but not least, registration to ConCon 2021 is open. ConCon 2021 will take place virtually on November 5th and 6th. Get your early bird discount today before it expires!

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

15 Ways to Leverage the C3 Community to Accelerate Consciousness and Your Career

 

In 6 months, Lawrence and I grew the C3: Corporate Consciousness Co-op Community to over 100 people, and we’re still growing.

This group’s vision was to put together leaders who have individually created their own ripples to elevate corporations’ consciousness and recognize that by working together, these ripples become larger, faster, and more powerful waves of transformation.

It’s for those who share a sense of urgency about how quickly we as a planet need to outpace technology, climate change, and greed before we destroy ourselves. 2020 was the largest global challenge we’ve experienced in our lifetime, but there is every reason to believe that other, perhaps greater, challenges lie ahead. We need leaders willing to sacrifice popularity and security for effectiveness in creating change.

The C3 community is not for wish-makers but action-takers. We are in it for the mutual value we are creating. Not only do we get to go further and faster together, but we also get to promote our own initiatives to garner more significant support. We get to support our counterparts’ professional endeavors to help them get further on their journey, as well.

Our goal for 2021 is to expand this group while maintaining quality, which we will measure by engagement. We don’t just want any members who request to join. We want those who are willing to participate and willing to add value.

Once you are in the community, you’ll be invited to engage in a few different ways. We’ll also use these guidelines to assess our engagement and growth success.

Introduce yourself. Reintroduce yourself.

Once your membership is approved, you will be welcomed, tagged, and asked to let the community know what topics and practices related to conscious leadership that you like to speak on. When you do this, your topics are truncated down to 30 characters and are added to our topics poll. This past month we had so many topics we split them into 3 polls and down to a final poll. Topics that have votes (or relevance/timeliness in their favor) are carried over to the next month, but they won’t always, especially as we expand.

If you were an original member, you might have only introduced yourself to a few people, whereas now there are over 100! So hop back on and reintroduce yourself! You may have also thought about other niche topics you want to speak on. Go ahead and share!

We aren’t threatening to delete anyone right now, but because of our engagement goals and our commitment to filling this community with co-creating action-takers, we may eventually do some house cleaning. Don’t just be a passive observer. Stay active and add value!

Read other people’s introductions

None of us have reached complete conscious leadership enlightenment, yet we all have valuable expertise. Someone right here in the community may be an expert in something that you are struggling with right now. As long as we maintain the group’s quality by ensuring that members are all committed to the same thing, co-creation, expect a warm reception to an invitation to exchange expertise. Follow up when you receive such an invitation, as well.

Vote in event topic polls

Vote for yourself or vote for someone else. Just vote! The point of voting is to ensure that our content co-creation is what you desire, even demand, based on what challenges are relevant to you in your conscious leadership journey. On the other hand, say you really want to hear about a topic, but you know you won’t be available on the first Thursday of the month at 1 PM ET, vote for another topic.

Did you refer someone into C3 because you knew that the community would add value to them and vice versa? Vote for them! Remember that a vote for a topic is also a vote for a member.

Spread the word

As I’ve said, we are not interested in growth alone. We do not want to dilute our community with people who are not practicing and promoting conscious leadership. We don’t want people who are more interested in serving their own brand interests than contributing to the movement.

If you know someone who sees issues in the corporate world that we cannot continue to facilitate, wants to serve better and is willing to reach their hand out, they are who we want in this community! We want to combine our expertise and knowledge, and help bring new people into the movement to change the way we work in the corporate world! Send them this link: http://bit.ly/LI_C3

Attend the events and comment/ask questions

Lawrence knows what he’s doing on Streamyard! He makes the radio operator in me proud, watching him keep his thumb on the conversation while also posting relevant links and tracking the comments. All while highlighting the nuggets of wisdom and thought-provoking questions of our audience. We would love to see expansion in participation and conversation-starting questions during these events!

Several of our panelists started as people who were engaging in the events! Visibility is part of the value we intend to provide to you, your experience, and your expertise. We create a safe space for people to share a different perspective. We believe that this is completely necessary if we are to achieve consciousness in the workplace.

Watch the replays

Each month, I list the questions we answered or even questions that beg for more answers. If you go down that list and find anything curious, go back and check it out! Let’s keep the conversation going in the comments. Share your thoughts and reflections. Share your tips!

Share the event summaries

The event summaries are meant to entice anyone in C3 who didn’t attend to watch. These summaries are also shared across social media to drive like-minded professionals to the group. Share it either individually to people who would appreciate the insights or publicly on your own social media pages (with relevant audiences).

Engage with us on Clubhouse and Twitter

Lawrence and I are everywhere, but there are a few places where we include the flow of our daily lives. We have collectively and individually created some ancillary outreach to continue finding new conscious co-creators for our community.

Every other Tuesday at 1:15, Lawrence (@bossllab) and I (@ripplemaker) jump off our telesummit strategy call and into a Clubhouse room. We talk about the tenets of conscious leadership and crowdsource ideas for keynotes and breakouts. If you are on this platform, follow us both and put our next event, March 9th, on your calendar. We’re talking about psychological safety and whatever else seems important to discuss.

This Wednesday at 11 AM ET, I’m re-starting Twitter Chats, at least experimentally. I’d like to see what the Twitterverse has to say about conscious leadership. Find the chat by searching #ConsciousLeaderChat just before 11 AM. You can also follow me @EpicCareering and engage from my profile tweet.

Share relevant articles/blogs – even your own – just ask a thoughtful question

The problem with many of the other groups for practitioners I am in is that it becomes a blog dumping ground. Everyone shares their blog, and no one engages. I mean, post after post with no engagement, not even likes!

For this reason, many group managers have prohibited promoting external links at all.

We are pro-promotion, which is rare. And, we get where these group managers are coming from, as well. When you share a post or article, start a discussion or ask a question, be sure to tag people with relevant experience and ask them to share their opinions or experiences.

Invite other members to connect

Connecting obviously makes it easier to co-create. As an OG LinkedIn trainer, I encourage you to add a note and explain your intentions. Mention the C3 community. If we manage this community right, you will find warm receptions to these invitations.

Promote your event

Do you know of other groups or organizations’ conscious leadership events? Let us know! Knowledge-share is yet another critical value of this community.

Attend someone’s event

When you see an event posted, and you have the time available, go. Engage. Let people know what we’re doing here. Bring a few great people back with you, especially insightful speakers. Talk up the C3 member who is hosting or speaking. Share with us a summary of the event. Give those of us who couldn’t attend an overview of what we missed and pieces of value!

Co-create a new event

We don’t have a monopoly on events in C3. If another topic is in demand, and you are an expert in that topic, create a new event. Even better, consider co-creating that event with some of the people who also voted for it. You can host it and invite others to be panelists, or you can ask someone else to host so that you can be a panelist and bring in other panelists – or not. We have found that we have tremendously enjoyable and valuable banter with 4 perspectives contributing, but that’s not a rule.

Give us more ideas

Most other LinkedIn groups that I am in are not very active. On the other hand, many of the Facebook groups I am in are very active, yet the group I created (Raising Corporate Consciousness) had nearly no engagement over several months. If you see other groups doing things to nurture co-creation, engagement, and value, please let us know about it.

If you see a post or event outside the group you feel is worth mimicking, post it yourself. We are not here to hog the spotlight; quite the opposite. We are here to elevate YOU!

Volunteer

With more ideas, we’ll need more volunteers to help support execution. With more volunteers, we can do more events and highlight more of our members. There are already ideas on the table for which we could use man/woman power, for instance – a structured mentor program.

There are gaps in our ability to engage on all platforms to promote the C3 community and our value. We are a part of many other platforms such as Slack, Quora, and Reddit. If you are savvy with any of these platforms, let us know. We can talk about how you can leverage the time you are already spending to add value to the community while also using the community to add value to your career and conscious leadership momentum.

Future Vision:

As of now, there is no monetization for this group. In fact, Lawrence and I engage our assistants’ help to help us manage the administration and promotion of this group, so it’s operating at a cost. This means we do not have a budget to pay for speakers.

However, stay tuned for an announcement about a June telesummit. This will be an event born from the C3 community that illuminates the thought-leadership, expertise, and value of its members.

C3 won’t be the best-kept secret forever, and the odds of having your topic chosen as our monthly topic will go down as membership goes up.

Take advantage of being a charter member of this group. Consider yourself at the forefront of this wave of conscious corporate change we are co-creating.

Amongst The Waves

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music GroupAmongst The Waves · Pearl JamBackspacer℗ 2009 Monkeywrench, Inc.Released on: 2009-09-20Producer: Brenden O’BrienC…

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

If You Really Want to Build a Talent Community, Try These Tips

I first heard of talent communities circa 2012 from Mahe Bayireddi as he was founding Phenom People. Had I still been in recruiting at the time, I probably would have been all over it, as it seems like a great, easy way to pluck talent on demand that is already engaged with your brand. Having been trained in branding as a recruiter in 2005, it really would have aligned with what we were taught – to establish long-term relationships by being strong resources and adding unique value from our experience.

Perhaps, having had an entrepreneurial interest, I would have helped my firm launch a branding and talent community-building service for our clients. It might have helped my firm establish itself, but I’m skeptical that it would have really done anything to accelerate or improve hiring for most of our clients, and I’d like to explain why.

By 2012, I had been working with and for job seekers rather than companies (with a few exceptions.) When you see the hiring process from the candidate’s perspective, you realize candidates aren’t buying into this whole talent community thing.

Even though coaches like me have spent the last 20 years teaching corporate professionals to compile and research target employers and conduct a campaign that is proactive, the vast majority of candidates conduct reactive job searches. They look for job postings when they’re ready to change jobs and use the method that is immediately in front of them – applying through job boards.

Companies have traditionally favored recruiting talent from its competition, but it’s not great career management to jump ship because a company you vied to work for when you were looking is finally ready to hire.

Last week I attended Talent Experience Live, a live LinkedIn event hosted by Natalie McKnight and Devon Foster of Phenom People. The topic was talent communities, and Randy Goldberg, VP of Talent Acquisition Strategy at MGM, was also there to share tips.

I took the opportunity to ask these experts a couple of questions, such as how they measure success and which metrics they track. Goldberg advised running your talent community initiative combining engagement efforts with marketing best practices, such as using technology and segmented messaging.

So, using traditional marketing tools, they create various groups of talent, create tags, send customized e-mails to each group, A/B test various messages, and track the number of e-mail opens, along with the number of clicks on apply links. Using these tools, he said MGM has achieved an 80% open rate, which is amazing.

Building a talent community is not as simple as setting up some great automated tech and hiring some marketing people to post on social media or send out a company newsletter. You can do that, but ROI will escape you…unless…

Your company has already established its brand as an employer of choice. Admired companies and industry leaders like Disney, Google, Marriott, Apple, and MGM will be able to implement technology and marketing to build talent communities because they are on people’s radar as a place where they can work among the best and brightest. While marketing directly to people, they can also market to any number of startups or competitors.

If you really want to build a talent community, you have to first brand your company as an employer of choice. Your talent must be perceived as the best and the brightest, and your policies and culture as lifestyle-friendly.

One of the other questions I asked Goldberg was whether executive branding was part of their talent community strategy. He said that executives are doing more publishing and public speaking – keynotes, panels, podcasts, and live events (obviously), such as Talent Experience Live.

This is a great way to make your company superstars more accessible, but it’s just one small component of executive branding.

Executive branding is a multi-tiered strategy that, to be truly effective, will require you to brand at the macro AND micro-levels. Praise and promote your front line just as much as your C-Suite. Also, show your prospective talent that employees have an admirable lifestyle. Show them who they are outside of their company identity.

Goldberg had a good point about not sending e-mails from a “do not reply” e-mail address. Offer a channel for your audience to connect with a REAL person. This demonstrates great empathy with job seekers.

The other thing that your company will have to fine-tune if you are going to be successful at attracting future superstars to your candidate pool is the candidate experience. The experience MUST match the hype! Goldberg mentioned that MGM allows its talent community to interact with its alumni. That’s employer brand confidence.

This requires standard operating procedures followed by every stakeholder involved in hiring. This includes non-automated, HUMAN standardized follow-up protocols for candidates who interview, rolling out position status updates to applicants, transparent salary negotiations, and comprehensive onboarding and training. Acknowledge and fix what people complain about on Glassdoor.

Furthermore, your company had better offer opportunities for diverse, dynamic (hard + soft, professional + personal) development, be proactive about succession planning and development planning, and practice transparency in communications throughout the organization.

Do not invest in building a talent community until your employer, executive, and employee brand are solid!

When you do, think not just in terms of marketing metrics, but also make sure that you have a way to tie this campaign with time to hire and the quality of hires, because what good is attracting candidates already engaged with your brand if they don’t land and succeed.

Are you realizing that your company needs to develop its executive branding? Schedule a consultation today!

New Edition – Cool It Now (Official Video)

Revisit New Edition’s number 1 songs here: https://UMe.lnk.to/NewEditionNumberOnes Listen and follow the New Edition Best Of Playlist: https://UMe.lnk.to/New…

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

Mrs. Huller is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

What Is Experiential Recruiting and Why Are We Not Seeing More of It?

 

Trust Fall

Trust Fall

Believe it or not, experiential recruiting isn’t new; it’s just a term that hasn’t caught on…yet.

Experiential recruiting refers to interactions between recruiters and/or hiring managers and candidates in which there is an element of performance, either professional or social. Some may say it’s just about storytelling and video, but that is one-sided. You may have heard the term “working interview,” but experiential recruiting can go far beyond a working interview (which, by law, do pay.) Hackathons are experiential recruiting. Any event a company has to which candidates would be invited can be considered experiential recruiting.

I held experiential events in 2008-2009. They were called Helping Hands Job Fairs. I paired recruiters up with candidates to do a half-day of community service and then break bread together. At one event, attendees sorted donations at a Habitat for Humanity Re-Store on a Saturday. At another, we had two teams winterizing homes in the community. At yet another, we had a few teams assigned to various projects through United Way’s Day of Caring, including mucking horse stalls, planting flowers, weeding, painting, etc.

For whatever reason, it was challenging at the time getting the employers committed, even though I was offering to recruit, identify, and pre-qualify the candidates. I stopped because I was pregnant; I had one baby, and then another. Organizing events is time-consuming and complex.

And here I am now with two kids in school all day. I’m ready to advise, strategize, plan and organize more events like this, as well as events that are less service-oriented and even more about fun, culture, and adventure – all depending on what you want your company to be to your current and future employees.

There’s a key to success – the events have to attract the talent with the hard skills, soft skills, and values that you want. The great thing about them is that, while events like hackathons can help you determine technical skills, these events help companies better assess someone’s soft skills and values. Also, hackathons sometimes attract top talent, but that talent doesn’t necessarily want to be employed by you or at all.

At the HireOne Task Force meeting I attended last month, the employers in the room all echoed the same complaint – not enough of the candidates with the hard skills they need have the soft skills that they want. So, they have to narrow their pool down in a pool that for some skills is already too small.

Part of the problem is that not everyone can put their best foot forward out of the gate; some people, like many introverts, need time to warm up. An interview, which can seem like a barrage of questions, doesn’t allow these people the time they need to let their true personalities show. They may come off as competent, but not likeable.

Another problem is that soft skills development isn’t taught in school (few do – it was something I taught as part of the Career Management and Professional Development course I taught at Drexel University to business students.) The county that sponsors HireOne offered an 8-week course for struggling job seekers that did also teach people how to shake hands, make eye contact, be courteous, follow etiquette, etc. They reported that still some participants could not put what they learned into practice

Remember when you learned how to drive, though? How much there was to pay attention to – the mirrors, the signals, pedestrians, pedals, steering, etc. It took time for those skills to become automatic, especially when you’re nervous.

Experiential recruiting events offers candidates who have the potential to become strong team members the opportunity to spend a little more quality time with recruiters and more time to come out of their shells and show who they really are.

Soft skills, which at their best can be considered high emotional intelligence, ARE teachable, and I have tricks to accelerate the application and adoption (mindfulness training and hypnosis.) Otherwise, people just need a lot more time and practice.

Time – ah. We have hit upon the major objection of doing these events.

If you have them during work hours, you are excluding those candidates who are working and find it challenging already to sneak away for an hour-long face-to-face interview. Some companies, like Vanguard, are combining community service initiatives with graduate recruitment, which eliminates the problem of time of day. While attracting and recruiting the best new graduates for your company can definitely be aided by events like this, many more companies are in need of better methods of attracting experienced talent. This is where most of a company’s ROI on talent gets generated.

If you have them at night, you are asking your staff to sacrifice their personal time.

This is all the more reason why these events really need to be designed to be time well spent – something you, your staff, and your candidates would want to do anyway.

Back in 2012 when I last spoke at the Greater Valley Forge Human Resources Association HR Summit (I speak there again next month on executive branding), I deconstructed why talent communities haven’t effectively helped companies build talent pipelines. Talent communities were a trend back then proposed as a way for companies to line up people with skill sets that they’ll need on a recurring basis or in the future. Some job boards were trying to transform themselves and take advantage of this. They never took off because job seekers don’t want to be in a community of competitors for jobs they want.

Companies like Google, Apple, Amazon, etc. build talent communities simply because they are who they are. Everyone else would like to think that they’re employment brand game is so strong, but let’s be clear what candidates really want – a fair shot, quality time, and to be recognized as special. They don’t want to wait in line or mingle with people who might get the job over them – that’s like The Bachelor/Bachelorette of recruiting, without the mansion, cocktails, and breathtakingly romantic trips.

Another time constraint is built into recruiting models that don’t allow for recruiters to even have that extra time. When my firm experimented with different reporting models and metrics, we had a certain number of calls and in-person interview we needed to complete each week. This meant the work-hard/play-hard culture I loved became a work-hard/work-long environment. I became disengaged pretty quickly. My wedding was a great distraction. The last thing I wanted to do was spend MORE time at work. In fact, I needed a long break; thank goodness for my honeymoon.

Job fairs do not count as experiential, even though they are face-to-face, and for the reasons stated above about the limited time and nature of an interview. Job fairs barely allow someone to get an impression past the initial first impression, which are NOT always accurate. In fact, recruiters have been evolving in their awareness of biases and ability to dismiss them. They occur automatically – it’s how our brain works. Our conscious mind matches experiences with experiences from the past. So we don’t expect that people can rid themselves of biases, just become more adept at recognizing and dismissing them. However, at a job fair, there is very little time to do this before the next person steps up. Again, like driving a car, you can become faster at this until it becomes more automatic. In the meantime, job fairs offer only a few stand out candidates with charisma to make a lasting impression.

A couple of things along my professional path inspired my interest in these events.

My former boss invited the team to spend a day at his Jersey shore house where he fed us and took us to the beach to play games. We knew he was a 3x Ironman and that he worked out. We could see how the other runner in the office gained his favor. I didn’t realize that beating him at horseshoes would impress him, but it did. He shared that with me. (I’m glad I didn’t know that beforehand or I might have choked.) He appreciated competitiveness as a quality. Then I remembered how me playing on a softball team was one of the things the company shared about me when I was hired. Apparently, that meant that I fit the culture.

However, so many times these things don’t come up in the interview process. They did a good job of uncovering that. Then I thought, what can companies do to identify these types of cultural qualities better? How about a game night?

When my youngest child finally started pre-school and I had mornings all to myself, I started Job Seeker Hikes. I invited job seekers to hike a moderately challenging trail with me while I asked them questions and gave them advice, not dissimilar to my free consultations, only I got to hike, one my favorite things in the world to do. I could coach multiple job seekers simultaneously, allowing them to learn from each other, build trust and rapport, and increase my chances of converting one of those job seekers into a paying client.

I called this experiential business development. And I loved it, and I’ll probably do it again now that both of my kids are in school, pending I can see that fitting into everything else I am excited to do with a full workday.

As I pondered my clients’ and contacts’ recruiting and hiring pains, I often came back to this model as a great replacement for job fairs, which, by everyone’s account, suck. I thought I coined the term “experiential recruiting,” but I looked it up and it was a thing already.

In fact, I identified a company in Milwaukee that was using events like this not only to help employers brand themselves and better assess the soft skills and values of their candidates, but they were also using the events to promote the cultural richness that the city has to offer. It’s called Newaukee. Why isn’t this in every city??? Talk about triple bottom line!

Another potential objection is cost, but the truth is, depending on what you do it may not cost you much more than a job fair. However, you can get more in-depth with a smaller, more targeted candidate pool.

To get ROI you first want to make sure you understand the kinds of candidates that YOU want who ALSO want to work for you. You (or we) build a candidate profile, much like a buyer profile. Find out what segments exist and what they like to do.

You might need two or three different kinds of events. For instance, you might want to have a game night or block party, a community service event, and an art gallery trip.

Need people who can be creative problem solvers? How about an escape room?

What do you think about having family-friendly recruiting events? Does that blow your mind?

Then you also need to get those people there AND use the events to tell a compelling story about your company and its people straight from its people, which may take a bit of training. The other key is LISTENING. Use the events to learn about your prospective candidates, improve candidate experience,  and create even better events.

Word of mouth spreads fast about these events. People will get very interested in attending, even if they aren’t very interested in working for you, so you (or we) have to vet them. However, even candidates who may not have thought they wanted a change may find themselves swayed and a bit more invested and enthusiastic about a company after a great event. If they really aren’t going to budge now, they may some day, and they can refer some talent in the meantime. So, the vetting is more about skills, value, and culture fit. A lot of the times the nature of the event and who is interested in it helps assess value and culture right off the bat.

So, in my Epic Careering version of these events we combine employer branding, target candidate identification and buzz-worthy experiences to keep a pipeline of high-quality potential hires pumping in, while the recruiting teams and hiring managers also have worthwhile experiences. I am all about productive play!

Contact me today to learn how your recruitment teams can use events like these to better compete for top talent.

Phish- Waste

great version great song

Karen Huller, author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days (bit.ly/GetFocusIn30), is founder of Epic Careering, a corporate consulting and career management firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, as well as JoMo Rising, LLC, a workflow gamification company that turns work into productive play. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. 

Karen was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends in hiring and careering. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer and Certified Career Transition Consultant and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business and recently instructed for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy at Cabrini College, where her students won the national competition and were named America’s Top Young Entrepreneurs.