Archives for looking for a job

5 Social Media Personalities that Attract Employers

Social Media Apps by Jason Howie of Flickr

Social Media Apps by Jason Howie of Flickr

 

Have you ever wondered if anyone outside of friends and family cared about your views and opinions on social media? In today’s job search, social media can make or break your chances of landing. According to a 2014 Jobvite survey, 55% of recruiters have reconsidered a candidate based on their social media profile. Maintaining a strong and attractive social media profile increases your visibility, and invites potential employers to learn more about you. Your online presence can even be the factor that seals the deal after an interview. Employers can use your social media profile to verify your qualifications, your personality, to see if you’re a cultural fit, and work out other details they were unable to glean from you during an interview. Making these little details easier for employers to find helps your marketing hit the target and inspires action when you know what is important to the recipient.

There have been countless articles written about how NOT to represent yourself on social media, but what are the best ways to present yourself? I’ve compiled a list directly inspired by Youtern’s article, “These 5 Social Media Personalities May Be Unemployable” and put an EPIC spin on them.

 

So what are the best types of social media personalities that increase your chances of landing a job?

 

  1. Complimentary Candice – Complimentary Candice is the type of employee who speaks positively about her experiences and her past employers. She highlights the good things her employers have done in the workplace, in the community, or how they positively impact the world. She comes off as enthusiastic about her work and her co-workers. She is the type of employee who comes to work with a smile and greets everyone with kind words. If the morale of the workplace is low, a Complimentary Candice will find a way to raise everyone’s spirits. In turn, she is the type of employee who people want to work with and her attitude can help positively impact productivity and profits.

 

  1. Showtime Samurai – The Showtime Samurai knows that social media and being online is important in this day and age. This type of employee uses social media as a part of their overall image and to capture the attention of potential employers. The Showtime Samurai knows if they are invisible online they won’t attract as many job opportunities. They know it is completely possible to network and to be found by potential employers without using social media, but social media is their sword. They use their weapon to connect with others and draw attention to themselves. The Showtime Samurai is also honorable and knows they must put their best self forward. They have a networking infographic because they know it will improve their visibility among the job-seeking crowd. They are transparent and they have a sizable number of followers. This type of social media personality is very attractive to employers who value a large social media following because those employers know a potential candidate with lots of followers can bring an instant expansion to a company’s visibility. The Showtime Samurai is also the type who uses their charisma to draw others closer. Their influence is constantly expanding by their numerous initiatives and projects in progress.

 

  1. Sociable Steve – Sociable Steve is similar to Showtime Samurai in that he knows the value of social media visibility. Where the Samurai is intense and loves a large following, Steve is laid back in his approach and doesn’t worry about large numbers of followers. He has an open social media profile and allows recruiters and hiring managers to not only follow him, but also accepts their friend requests. He knows that his passion and knowledge can be appealing to potential employers. His life is an open book that is warm and welcoming to anyone who comes across his profile. Sociable Steve’s other big strength is his ability to make clients and customers feel at ease. His easy-going personality and calm reasoning can diffuse a variety of difficult situations.

 

  1. Professional Perry – Professional Perry knows that people are looking at his social media profile and that it represents his online brand. He doesn’t post inappropriate content, make crude jokes, and never shows his wild weekends online. Instead, he posts about the volunteering work he does, about his positive family outings, and his hobbies. His value makes him trustworthy and a good spokesperson for a conservative company with strict social media policies.

 

  1. Transformative Tim – Transformative Tim is a change agent. He is bold and not afraid to tackle difficult subjects, engage in debate and to try and change public opinion TACTFULLY and RESPECTFULLY. He is a master at seeing both sides of an issue. He knows where he stands and does his best to win others to his side. Transformative Tim also knows where to draw the line and when to stop pressing if he can’t sway an opinion. This type of personality isn’t appropriate for all companies, but it is perfect for social impact organizations, non-profits, lobbying organizations, and public office officials.

There’s a counter-argument to the positive social media personalities: “If I only post about good things, I’m not being true to myself!” In his Slate article, Paul Heibert states numerous reasons why people tend to over-share content on social media that can make them un-hirable. One reason is the lack of inhibition and a sense of being invisible due to not having face-to-face communication with others when posting to social media. Like it or not, your presence online is your brand and employers are going to research you in order to lean more about you. The 2014 Jobvite survey noted that 93% of recruiters will review a candidate’s social media profile before making a hiring decision. Of the 93% of recruiters, 55% of those recruiters reconsidered a candidate based on their social media profile, and 61% of those reconsiderations were negative. Profanity, illegal drug references, alcohol references and spelling errors topped the negative reconsiderations on recruiters’ lists. On the flipside, over 60% of recruiters want to see positive content such as memberships in professional organizations and volunteering for charities. By using the knowledge that potential employers will search for you online and that you can make yourself more appealing through social media, you can increase your chances of landing the job.

 

If you have a social media profile and are searching for your next job, it is almost certain that a potential employer will view your social media profile. You can make their decision to consider you for the job easier by making your social media presence attractive. This means having a social media profile that will strengthen the best aspects of your personality and give employers a positive glimpse into the type of worker you will be at their companies. Your online presence also avoids the negative pitfalls that turn off potential employers. American entrepreneur Amy Jo Martin said it best: “Social media is changing the way we communicate and the way we are perceived, both positively and negatively. Every time you post a photo, or update your status, you are contributing to your own digital footprint and personal brand.” Just as you want to be perceived positively by employers in the real world, you want to be perceived the same way online.

 

Quickly Land Your Next Job in September

Life's Paradox by Stefano Corso of Flickr

Life’s Paradox by Stefano Corso of Flickr

Summer traditionally means slow days at work and vacation time. As the days lengthen and heat up, fun and sun beckon like the call of a siren. The last thing a majority of people are thinking about is the job search. But as summer winds down, companies ramp up their efforts to fill open vacancies and achieve fourth-quarter goals. This is the perfect opportunity to land a new position.

Hiring may appear to slow down in the summertime, but our economy is in a state of recovery, and job growth continues.  It can appear to be deceiving that there are fewer opportunities during the summer because open positions take longer to fill. Human resources and hiring managers have increased challenges bringing stakeholders together to make decisions as people go on vacation. This delays the hiring process because there are fewer managers to conduct face-to-face interviews. Additionally, companies fill a large number of positions during the beginning of the year, so they don’t have as many positions available summer months.

According to ERE.net, the average time for an employer to fill a position is at its highest at 27 business days. This costs companies money. You can save the company money by being ready to promote yourself effectively for an open position. The candidates who are ready to strike with effective branding, a smart strategic plan to be visible, and the ability to articulate how their value presents a solution will get interviews and offers.

Perhaps you’ve put your job search on hold for the summer. Maybe you’re just jumping into the search. You may dread spending another day in your current office. Or you may want to secure your financial future by landing the right job as soon as possible. Starting your job search with effective tactics can accelerate your transition. Wouldn’t it be great to land at your next employer before the fall chill hits the air? It’s not too late pull ahead of other job seekers. As recorded by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, September is a month where hiring typically surges. With some preparation, you can capitalize on employers’ needs to land your next job.

 

Aid your job search with these seven stages to landing

The seven stages to landing can help greatly aid in your job search. Instead of starting your job search by hitting job boards or filling out applications, you can take a methodical approach to your search. This introspective approach can help you identify your strengths, skills and the value you can offer potential employers. Mastering these seven stages can take a long time, but you can also accelerate these steps in order to land your next position faster. Visualize attracting your next employer instead of hoping they notice you.

As you explore the list, rate yourself in each area from one to seven, with seven being the highest number. Keep those numbers in mind for now, we will revisit them later.

 

  1. Job Discovery

Think about your ideal career or position. Do you have a target position or employer? Think about aligning your career with contributions you are passionate about. For example, if someone is concerned about sustainability they can align themselves with an employer that has the same concerns. How can you use your talents to make these contributions? What opportunities will the job market present? What are the logical steps you’ll take in order to get there?

If you are going for the right target, you may be a little scared, but overall you’re very excited. You find yourself becoming enthusiastic about developing your plan, and you have confidence that you want the position enough that you’ll be able to overcome challenges as they present themselves.

 

  1. Branding Development

Think about the four to six things that uniquely qualify you for a position. It could be your worldview or perspective on problems, a certain approach to providing solutions, the way you go about working with other people, insights from other industries, an unconventional education, life skills, or even your attitude. Then use these qualities to form your branding points and connect the dots between your qualities and the value that can be realized by an employer. By having these branding points before you start the development process, you can ensure the content you create has meaning for your audience. These materials communicate your strengths and advantages to potential employers, people in your network, and everyone else. Each target requires a different approach:

 

  • Corporate targets require a résumé or biography.
  • Academic, scientific or international targets need a CV. A CV is more comprehensive than a résumé.
  • Create a one-page networking infographic for network contacts.
  • Wow your prospective clients with a website brochure or advertising copy. This isn’t just replicating your CV or résumé, it is powerfully branded, reader-friendly and is filled with effective content that inspires action.

 

  1. Networking/Social Networking

Occasionally, the hardest part of this step is actually recognizing your network. A lot of clients tell me they don’t have networks, but it’s usually because they aren’t thinking about all of the people who would really want to help them. The ideal networking process can be fun. Think of finding ways to be around people you enjoy and inspire them to help you be a solution for your next company. When your network is properly trained in how to develop leads for you, your momentum becomes exponential. It’s like having a sales force you don’t have to pay. Have you effectively trained your network to develop leads for you?

 

  1. Prospecting

Do you have a plan of action to reach your ideal position? Have you sourced hiring managers from potential employers? Are you in position to uncover advertised and unadvertised opportunities? While some information can be easily obtained from the internet, most likely more of the critical criteria for your next position and company will be better divulged by someone who is or has been on the inside. Prospecting is also tied to our next step because what you learn about your target company will help you get noticed, be memorable, and market yourself as exactly what they need. This step is critical to helping you land at a desirable position and location (as opposed to just obtaining any job), and beating out the competition by pursuing jobs that may not even be posted, also known as the hidden job market. Most people skip this step and spend more time getting fewer results. These actions, along with the next step are the most self-affirming stages because once you master them you will have generated job security.

 

  1. Distribution/Follow-up

You’ve met people with whom you had quality interactions. Are you prepared to follow up? This means being prepared to track your contacts and consistently keeping in touch without being overbearing. A great outcome is to deepen relationships with your contacts. Many job seekers fear they are imposing, when actually this is where more meaningful relationships are revealed, though some relationships may end. In this part of the process, the time you invest in people starts to payoff in more ways than just job leads. These are relationships that will withstand a job transition, as well as future job transitions. You can consider these relationships like money in a high-yield account. Sometimes just one meaningful strategic relationship can alter the course of your life.

 

  1. Interviewing

You’ve made it far enough in the hiring process for an interview. Being ready looks like thoroughly researching a potential employer, knowing the qualifications for the job, and how your skills and abilities are a match for an employer. Ideally, you’ll be excited to meet with prospective employers and know how to authentically address the hard questions. If the fit is right, you’ll start with an open and comfortable conversation about what’s possible for both parties, although it’s always about the employer first. The best outcome would be an offer that you are excited to accept and knowing it is what’s best for your career and life. Have you reinforced the values you bring and why you’re qualified for the opportunity? Are you ready to close the “deal?”

 

  1. Compensation Negotiation

Have you researched the market value of your position? How much are perks and benefits worth to you? Are you prepared to consider a counter-offer from your current employer, or another potential employer? Are you ready to accept an offer letter? Part of compensation negotiation is also knowing when to ask about salary and benefits. This process ideally looks like two parties who appreciate the value the other has to offer, and they respect each other enough not to enter into a power struggle. The outcome is determining a win-win package where both parties feel like they are receiving a good deal.

 

Remember the scale I mentioned at the start of this list? Rate yourself in each area of the list. If you are less than a seven in any of these areas, you may risk prolonging your job search. Think of this process like climbing a set of stairs. If any of the steps are loose or broken, placing your weight on them can send you tumbling down, forcing you to start over again and delaying time as you repair the broken step.

 

Take advantage of just-in-time training

If you want an edge in your job search, consider our “7 Stages to Landing in September” webinar. It is a free online event that will teach you the best way to start your job search, entice employers, maintain job search progress, and make sure your conversations lead to inspired action. These steps can cut the average job search in half. We’ve had clients fix their “broken step” and land within a month. A small time investment can yield tremendous job search results.

 

September is traditionally the second busiest hiring month of the year and is only surpassed by January. By using better methods to entice employers, you can get out ahead of the crowd and land faster. Imagine what an ideal change in your career would look like. Share your ideal change in comments and then join us on Thursday evening for our free webinar!

 

More résumés ≠ better results

If-you-always-make-the

An investment in multiple resumes usually doesn’t pay off the way people intend them to. There are exceptions to the rule, but for the most part this is usually true. Of course, when you think about it, not everybody fits in a box or a job the way a company might write a description so there are usually multiple jobs that people qualify for. However, just because you’re qualified for a job doesn’t mean that it is something you should be pursuing.

Let me explain. When I was a recruiter, often IT candidates had several different IT disciplines in their toolkit.  At the same time they could be a project manager, a program manager, a business analyst, a developer, a QA tester–all of that balled into one. As a recruiter, I wanted my candidates to be as marketable as possible for as many jobs as possible, especially the candidates that I knew were really great performers and would represent the firm very well. When I transitioned into being a career coach, I have a much different perspective on the strategy of having multiple resumes.

From a recruiting perspective, you can be much more marketable for many more jobs. If you are, say, a consultant, that’s a good thing. There’s a higher probability of you being able to land your next gig. Even though you may have skill sets in various different IT disciplines, you still can be niched in clinical trials, academic pursuits, financial applications or merchant services and still continue to get work as a consultant in those various positions.

However, people who are searching for a full-time opportunity have two choices if they are one of those people who have multiple disciplines. Number one is to target a company that needs you to fill all those jobs simultaneously. They’re usually the starter companies, the smaller companies, or the flat organizations. They usually want people with dynamic backgrounds to come in who can plug-in wherever. Those are the types of situations where, if you have a varied toolkit or a skill set and you want to be able to apply that in different ways every day, then that would be a really good target for you.

However, if you’re looking for larger organizations where positions tend to be more siloed and you’re one of these people with a varying background, you can spend a lot of time writing and sending your multiple resumes to various job descriptions that ask for a specific title and get very few results.  This can make you feel you are undesirable to that company. From the company’s perspective, especially if they see one candidate applying for multiple positions, it looks unfavorable. It looks risky. It makes you look like either you don’t know what you want or that you’d pretty much take anything.

Think about the kinds of companies that would be attracted to a candidate who’d be willing to take anything. Not many good companies want to hire a candidate who is willing to take anything, unless they’re willing to offer you the job where you have to be willing to do anything on the job. I know there are a lot of job seekers out there who are in that situation. You might have been applying to multiple jobs for a long period of time and getting very few results and feeling like at this point you just have to be desperate. You have to apply to anything. You have to accept anything that comes your way. The problem with that is you’ve come to a conclusion about your viability in the job market based on a flawed distribution strategy.

If you are one of those people with varying skill sets who is apply for a job in a larger corporation, the fastest way to your next opportunity is actually to pick the role that you want to spend most of your time doing and then market yourself specifically for that role. You can include information about the other disciplines that you also have experience with, but you have to brand yourself based on the primary position. Then when you get into that role, you can always look for ways to make yourself more valuable by lending those skills and talents to other departments or projects, other teammates, other supervisors.

A résumé is an investment. My goal as a résumé writer and a career coach is that when you make that investment, you get a return on that investment.  A return on your investment that a professional résumé produces is engagement, interviews, and ultimately a job offer. Not just any job offer, but a job offer that you find desirable that enables you to really thrive and succeed in your career with the optimum career and income growth.

So before you make a decision to have multiple résumés, think about who it is you’re targeting as an employer.  If you are targeting smaller startups, family-owned businesses or flat organizations—places where they like people to have multiple hats, that’s an opportunity for you to brand yourself as a multi-skilled talent.  You must make sure that you’re targeting a specific audience with your résumé so that you’re not wasting your time and then coming to conclusions about your viability based on a lack of response.

Recruiters and employers are not going to take their time evaluating your resume in detail to determine where it is you fit best in their organization. They’d rather move on to somebody they are sure fits the job description. You are not increasing your competitive edge in the job market by being somebody who is multi-skilled and applying for siloed positions.

So you have some decisions to make. I am here to help you make them, if you need me to. When you are ready to choose one or the other, then you are ready to brand yourself and market yourself effectively to an employer who will appreciate what it is that you are bringing to the table and extend that job offer.

 

Tales From The Flipside, Episode 3 now available!

“How do you deal with people who blame everything else for their unemployment?” I was asked today by someone referring to the government as the main culprit people point to. I told her I don’t waste my time and energy getting goaded into arguments about politics. Many people look to the government to make conditions more conducive to finding gainful employment. These folks, most likely, will not be my clients – at least not now. Maybe when they are sick and tired of being sick and tired they’ll reach out for my help.

 

My clients tend to want to be in control of their careers. Being in control requires taking accountability. When someone is ready to learn a new, more effective system and do what they hadn’t been doing before, they get better results. She knew, however, that my mission is to help as many people as possible, and the group of people that she sees needing guidance, tools, and strategy such as I provide, are great in number and will not recognize the help that I’m offering as a solution to their problems.

 

While I do have big plans to revolutionize the way people approach their career, and how companies approach hiring, right now it is in my power to change career trajectories one person at a time (or more like 5 to 10 at a time.)

 

The podcast I started producing, Tales From The Flipside, chronicles real life transitions success stories in hopes that people will recognize a part of their story and the challenges and hardships that some of these clients have faced, but more so, that they will see a future self in the happy ending.

 

This podcast is one of my most favorite things I’ve ever done, and I hope to do thousand more. It’s really not just about their story; it’s about their empowerment.

 

Now that they have filled a gap in their knowledge and skills around careering, they have every reason to believe that, no matter what happens, they will be able to land happily on their feet in a better position.

 

Try that feeling on for yourself. Is that something that you want?

 

I welcome you to subscribe for free and gain access to all of our episodes of Tales From The Flipside.

If while listening you start to imagine what your transition success story will sound like, allow us to provide to you with a free resume and campaign evaluation. Let us provide you with value and advice that will accelerate and optimize your career transition. Enable us to get to know you a little, and establish our expertise. We are confident that we can help you if you let us.

E-mail your résumé to info@epiccareering.com and we’ll send you our needs assessment form.

Which introduction would you rather have?

sittin-on-top-of-the-world1Most people have heard that networking is the best way to find a new job. It is also the best way to find great candidates. The quandary is how do you get to be the candidate that is recommended to hiring managers by your network for jobs.


There are three ways this can happen, and sometimes the person giving the introduction needs your coaching to do it right. So, which way is the right way?


A.“Hi, Chris. I wanted to introduce you to my former coworker, Annmarie. I used to work with her at PeopleSoft. Annemarie and I worked on several implementations together. She was always diligent, attentive, and very responsive. In fact, she was the one who identified the reason we kept having issues with rollouts. This eliminated  a whole week of rollout time and made clients very happy. I remember you mentioning that clients had started to complain about rollouts being delayed. I thought it made sense for you to talk to Annemarie to see if maybe she could give you some insight on your issue and perhaps be of service on a more long-term basis.”

 

B.“Hi, Chris. I wanted to introduce you to my former coworker Annemarie. She’s in transition now and looking for an opportunity as an Implementation Manager. Do you know of any jobs available for her?”


C.“Hi, Chris. Please help my friend Annemarie. She’s been out of work for several months now and really needs to get back to work to pay her bills. Is your company hiring? She’s an Implementation Manager, but I’m sure she’d take pretty much anything.”


The answer to me is obvious, but I might be surprised by some responses.


Watch my vlog to learn how to elicit the most powerful of these introductions.

2 key social media activities that increase your visibility and hireability exponentially!

If you want employers to know how valuable you are, be valuable to others.

Two job seekers volunteering in the 2009 Helping Hands Job Fair - Shari Shaw Leibert and Linda Penrod

Two job seekers volunteering in the 2009 Helping Hands Job Fair – Rita Woodward and Linda Penrod

The Jobvite 2012 Social Recruiting Report rated recruiter reaction to certain activities. Of the activities evaluated, professional organizational membership and charity/volunteering activities left the most positive impression on recruiters. Why would that be?

Two reasons:

  1. Involvement in professional organizations demonstrates a personal investment in your career and can serve as evidence of your passion.
  2. There is no greater evidence you can provide to prove that you enjoy making a contribution than to take your personal time and money to assist in an important cause. There is an assumption that you will spend your time similarly within your own organization if you are on board with their mission.

The level of your involvement is commensurate with the positive impression that you make. Social media makes it very easy for an employer/recruiter to see how involved you are:

  • If you are an inactive observer vs. an active participant in online group discussions.
  • Furthermore, if what you post/comment reflects naïveté vs. expertise.
  • If you hold a membership vs. attend events (which can be evidenced by an expanding network and “check ins.”)
  • If you are using your status updates to ask for personal favors vs. assist others in your network, raise awareness or funds for your cause, or share relevant, valuable industry news.

Additionally, the more active you are in your career and in your community, the more valuable you are -> more in demand you become -> the more confidence you have -> the more choosy you can be -> the greater the compensation you can negotiate!

So, there is ROI for the investments of time and, potentially, money that you make in professional organizations and volunteering activities. Of course, the spirit with which you do it should not be focused on what you get out of it. That will most certainly backfire and have the opposite effect.

UNVEIL YOUR BRILLIANCE!