Archives for linkedin tips

Celebrify Your Client-Facing Superstars with LinkedIn

Last week, I took my first business trip since 2018 to teach one of my dearest friends’ team of family lawyers how to brand themselves on LinkedIn. Lately, I have been talking to more and more people who are realizing that LinkedIn isn’t just something you use when you’re searching for a job. The team collectively couldn’t believe how much they could actually do on the platform, but they were understandably disappointed by some of its limits, as well.

LinkedIn makes it very easy for you as an individual to leverage all of the platform’s free features to gain exposure, craft messaging that resonates deeply with the kinds of people with whom you prefer to do business, and convert extended online connections into direct real-life connections. However, for businesses, unless you invest in advertising and premier packages, your company page remains more of an extension to individual profiles rather than vice versa. That’s just fine for a company focused on relationship management, since it’s the people that form relationships that then extend the company brand.

In a world where customer service norms include maze-like automated phone menus that never seem to understand your request, the most obvious way to stand out is to promote your front-line customer-facing employees and service providers as your company’s celebrities.

I find that people, by nature, are dynamic. The way I used to describe branding in the first decade of my business might have made it sound as if we have to file down the dimensions of people to fit into a shape that their audience, be them investors, partners, shareholders, stakeholders, vendors, employees, or clients, would easily recognize. However, the opposite is really true – the more dimensions of yourself you demonstrate through your online profiles, the more a variety of people will relate to and resonate with you. These will be people who align with your values, pending your values are also embedded in your content. Not knowing exactly how to do this is the problem my clients solve when they engage me.

I have had clients come to me to brand their LinkedIn profiles when they are pursuing fellowships, wooing investors, applying for an exclusive membership, proposing to be a speaker, or being considered for an industry award. They have also come to me when they want to build or deepen a myriad of relationships.

My suggestion that they show vulnerability and authenticity usually triggers some fears, particularly for those who prefer to stay anonymous and safe. There would definitely be legitimate reasons for some companies with many angry customers (everyone has more now than ever) to keep anonymous the people who receive and fail to resolve customer issues. Still, if a competitor felt more certain they could better care for those customer complaints and presented their customer care members as real, accessible people who genuinely care, imagine how easy it would be to capture those customers. Then the work becomes about delivering the utmost service, converting those customers into raving fans of your company, and leveraging the word of mouth and testimonials of happy customers to gain more, which is significantly less expensive than advertising.

If you read this and think, well, what if we invest in the personal branding of our team members and only make them more attractive as prospective employees to our competitors, then you likely have insecurities about your ability to retain your employees. Additionally, those insecurities are manifesting in ways that make it even more likely your people will flee, and you should probably engage a leadership coaching firm (like us) to help you retain your employees in more conscious ways. Keep in mind, when you celebrify your client-facing support and service employees AND your company brand demonstrates its authenticity, attracting talent is that much easier.

Less obvious people in your workforce to brand on LinkedIn than the people who represent your business to prospective clients and partners are the people who liaise between departments and depend on gaining alignment between them to achieve large-scale corporate initiatives. Even vendors give better deals to people with whom they have better relationships. Really, anyone in your company who relies on relationship management to achieve results will benefit from branding themselves on LinkedIn.

In the workshop I did last week, I guided the team through a mediative journaling exercise to help them identify their unique qualities and strengths, since I didn’t have 90 minutes to spend with each of them to uncover them myself and craft branding points. Then I guided them in where and how they can create meaningful, specific content that expressed and demonstrated these qualities and strengths, along with the outcomes that they produce. I showed them why and how to curate their home feed so that it was easier to quickly hop on LinkedIn to get and give value. I showed them how to write a LinkedIn connection invitation message that gets accepted 54%+ of the time and how to follow that up so that their network grew organically with people who had a high probability of converting from an online acquaintance to a fast friend, to a long-term ally. I showed them how to measure their effectiveness and make adjustments if they were not receiving quality invitations from the increased views of their profile. There were also some tips on how they can still get incredible brand expansion by using features that LinkedIn doesn’t do as well as other platforms, like groups and hashtags.

The feedback that I received was that, while they may have avoided LinkedIn before, they were energized by the possibilities now. They walked away excited to utilize the platform to help the firm as it launches support programming for clients as a supplement to legal services, so that they can get their clients on the other side of their legal challenges and into a new, better life. You’d probably be surprised by what you can do on LinkedIn. Want to know more? Schedule a consultation.

The White Stripes – We’re Going To Be Friends (Official Music Video)

Watch the official music video for “We’re Going To Be Friends” by The White StripesListen to The White Stripes: https://TheWhiteStripes.lnk.to/listenYDSubscr…

Karen Huller, CEO of Epic Careering, is the co-founder of The Consciousness Conference (ConCon) and the C3: Corporate Consciousness Co-op community on LinkedIn. She is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a conscious career and leadership development firm specializing in executive branding, talent-values alignment, and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of Mrs. Huller’s 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

Mrs. Huller was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She serves on the board for the Upper Merion Community Center, which she helped establish, and is an advisor to Florida International University for their Women in Leadership program. For her service as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. Mrs. Huller has also been the lead singer for Harpers Ferry, a rock cover band, for 20 years. She lives in King of Prussia, PA with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

LinkedIn Branding That Makes Work Better in So Many Ways

Let me clear something up about branding. It can have a negative connotation in an environment where images are manipulated to fool people. Branding is not “spin”. It is not just a catchy logo or tagline, though those are sometimes appropriate extensions of your brand.

When branding is authentic, it helps you surround yourself with people who get you. More doors of opportunity open up. When your LinkedIn network is filled with people who get you, whatever you want to accomplish is that much easier. When the people you interface with regularly are people with whom you feel a deeper connection, the work takes on a deeper meaning, too, and can even feel like fun a lot more often. These are byproducts of branding that I wish more people understood, especially now when so many people are considering a change, but feeling like they’ll only get more of the same. Branding is a game-changer for greater career fulfillment. It makes you bolder in your actions.

Essentially, your brand is everything that is conjured up and associated with you, your name, and your business, whether that’s a business you own or your profession. This includes images, memories, stories, words, and emotions. Yes, you want your brand to evoke emotions, and it will, whether you are intentional about it or not. Maya Angelou wisely said, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

It can be very hard to be objective about what emotions are evoked in others by your brand. People, generally, will be evoked to very different degrees by very different stimuli. That is why effective branding requires you to understand and empathize with your audience. How do you acquire this level of understanding? Well, LinkedIn can really help you here, too. The empathy part, well, that can come from understanding, but ultimately depends on your emotional intelligence to fully stand in your audience’s experience.

Who is your audience? By audience I mean whomever you wish to attract. This could include customers/clients, investors, partners, experts, talent, employers, recruiters, media, etc. Narrowing down your audience is really the key to effective branding, and it’s what most people avoid due to fear of limiting opportunity. It’s really counter-intuitive, but effective branding isn’t about being as marketable to as many audiences as possible. I’m not just talking about using demographics to narrow down your audience. There are many more powerful audience qualities to consider, like what matters most to them? What entices them to act? What kind of people do they allow into their inner circle? What are they really up to in their career and life? What common interests could bond you?

Your brand, at its intentional best, is a bridge between what you offer the world and who will need, want, appreciate, and invest in it. Essentially, the action you seek from your audience is that they invest time, effort, money, relationship capital, or any combination thereof.

A branded LinkedIn profile starts with identifying your unique expression of your top qualities, skills, experiences, mindsets, approaches, and talents and the value that they tend to or can create for your target audience. This is where your understanding of your target audience becomes really important. Many people struggle to understand what to say. Let your audience’s needs drive this. If you still aren’t sure, it’s time to deepen your relationship with your audience, and LinkedIn is one of the best tools for this. You likely have members of your audience already in your network (if you’re not a beginner.) Invite them to talk for a couple of minutes, but not about you – about them. Get familiar with the words that they use to describe their experiences, emotions, and decisions. Ask them what issues they find meaningful, what outcomes they want most, and what makes them decide to take action or not.

Epic Careering has a proprietary process for developing branding points, which are the foundation upon which all of your content and copy is crafted. This process produces a powerful psychological effect on your ideal profile visitor.

  • It creates instant resonance, which serves as a strong relationship foundation and rapport accelerator.
  • It produces an incremental, sometimes subconscious build-up of excitement at the possible value you can offer.
  • It induces a sense of urgency to take action (inviting you to connect).
  • It inspires more of the right people to accept YOUR invitation

I have already written an article that goes over the areas of your profile that you need to optimize with branded content to produce these effects, and you can read it here.

As I alluded to earlier, another byproduct of branding is boldness. So many of us have been conditioned to yield attention, praise, accolades, and credit which results in us allowing opportunities to pass us by. Branding helps you embrace your strengths – to own them. In my experience, branding creates seismic shifts in what my clients see as possible. Their whole experience of careering changes from giving the power to employers to having choice and control in where they go from here. Their motivation to pursue opportunities then comes from a sense of duty to offer their massive value.

I’ve noticed that collectively, as we have emerged from solitary lives and integrated back into immersion, we have more of a tendency to be selective about with whom we spend time. In some ways, we have to be careful not to exclude diverse thinking from our networks by surrounding ourselves only with those with whom we agree and relate. Branding, at its best, is not meant to be used to this extreme. On the other hand, spending most of our time with people with whom we feel safe and can be ourselves doesn’t just enhance our experience of life, but creates a sense of safety, acceptance, and room for growth that will help us all step out of survival mode and move toward a life worth living.

Are you ready to be bold? Schedule your free consultation now!

Imagine Dragons – Natural

Listen to Mercury – Act 1: https://ImagineDragons.lnk.to/Mercury Listen to Origins, ft. Natural, Zero, Machine and Bad Liar: http://smarturl.it/OriginsID Sh…

Karen Huller, CEO of Epic Careering, is the co-founder of The Consciousness Conference (ConCon) and the C3: Corporate Consciousness Co-op community on LinkedIn. She is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a conscious career and leadership development firm specializing in executive branding, talent-values alignment, and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of Mrs. Huller’s 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

Mrs. Huller was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She serves on the board for the Upper Merion Community Center, which she helped establish, and is an advisor to Florida International University for their Women in Leadership program. For her service as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. Mrs. Huller has also been the lead singer for Harpers Ferry, a rock cover band, for 20 years. She lives in King of Prussia, PA with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

A Two-Letter Word That Heightens Your Brand

Let’s explore a two-letter word that heightens your brand, résumé, and LinkedIn profile. Yes, there are a lot of opinions about résumés, and it can be confusing. We all have our reasons and you ultimately have to decide which reasons most align with you and how you do things.

So, this advice may not resonate with you. However, if it does, applying it will enable you to attract like-minded employers, which increases the chances that a company that matches your values, approach, and cultural preferences will invite you to interview, positions you more competitively throughout the interview process, gives you leverage in compensation negotiation, and, once hired, reduces friction, and accelerates assimilation with your new company’s people and processes. This is not just résumé advice; it’s career management advice. This doesn’t just set you up to be invited to interview, it sets you up to be invited to interview by companies at which you would thrive, where they get you, they appreciate you, and you can bring your whole self to work.

**Next time you get advice on your résumé, LinkedIn profile, or company website, find out the reasons, qualify the source, and make sure that the advice has produced consistent desired results.

You may have heard to keep your résumé short – get to the point – the results.

By all means, results are not just important, they are critical. They do establish a track record of success that employers need to feel confident you will achieve at their company.

That being said…

Your brand isn’t just what you accomplished. It’s not just your results; it’s your unique way of achieving them. The “by.” How did you accomplish them?

This advice is for people who don’t just want to work at a company that pursues profit no matter what the costs and casualties are. This advice is for people who care how a company achieves profit. It’s for people who want to work for managers that don’t drive performance any old way, but by genuinely engaging their team in the mission, providing the needed resources, and eliminating potential and real obstacles.

If you care about how your company achieves their results, take a few words wherever possible in your résumé to succinctly (yes, we still need to accommodate business bandwidth) explain the methods, tools, approaches, modalities, and best practices you used to get your results!

Bullets need variety to keep the reader engaged, so not every bullet will have the actual word “by.” Where it is included, it likely will be within the bullet, though when the HOW is the part of the accomplishment you want to be noticed most, put it first.

Here are some examples:
  • By applying lean principles, eliminated 3 hours of administrative processing, which increased customer response time by as much and elevated customer satisfaction scores by 68%.
  • Nearly eliminated turnover by identifying issues and resistance early through initial onboarding assessments, weekly one-on-one meetings, and monthly team alignment meetings.
  • Increased revenue 300% in six months with a monthly webinar series featuring breakthrough tips and tricks available with advanced product features.

Here you see “with a” is another way of saying “by.”

You see in the second bullet, “through” is also a way to include the how – especially when there is more than one or a deeper level of how to portray.

Here are some other helpful phrases that elevate your brand in different ways.

Overcame – Sometimes the challenges you faced to achieve are part of what makes the achievement so impressive.

E.g. Overcame client objections to the new user interface to achieve 99% adoption by demonstrating how the team applied human factors engineering in the design.

Even though – Is another way to describe a challenge that stood to prevent you from achieving results.

In order to – With this phrase, you don’t establish that you succeeded, but this can get across your intention. If you achieved it, start the bullet with the verb that best describes the achievement. Examples are raised, lowered, mitigated, contained, etc. However, sometimes forces beyond our control prevent us from arriving at the desired result, and sometimes the results are not in yet.

E.g. Established matrixed reporting structure and 7-point metrics in order to create staff redundancy and accountability that is expected to keep the team on task, on track, and on time.

So that – Another way of saying “in order to”.

If you want your résumé and LinkedIn profile to do more than generate interviews, then engage Epic Careering for conscious career branding.

Conscious career branding will:
  • Increase the chances that a company that matches your values, approach, and cultural preferences will invite you to interview.
  • Position you more competitively throughout the interview process.
  • Give you leverage in compensation negotiation.
  • Reduce friction once hired, and accelerate assimilation with your new company’s people and processes.
  • Put you on an accelerated path for career growth.

Schedule your complimentary consultation now.

Gerry and the Pacemakers – How do you do it (HQ Audio)

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Interview for the Office of Women’s Advancement and Advocacy: Job Searching, LinkedIn and Best Practices

It was an honor to be interviewed by Christopher Waters for the Office of Women’s Advancement and Advocacy. We had a valuable discussion on job searching, networking, and LinkedIn best practices!

We covered:

  • The first thing to do when you begin your job search.
  • The importance of having an updated LinkedIn profile.
  • How to maximize the impact of your LinkedIn headline.
  • How to effectively use keywords on LinkedIn.
  • The value of building a network.
  • How to effectively conduct your job search.
  • What makes a candidate stand out.

…and so much more.

If the experience of job searching for you is one of frustration, disappointment, futility, and doubt, I share some things within the interview that I invite you to try as an experiment for 3 weeks.
Report back your results!

Click below to watch the entire replay.

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Leveraging LinkedIn for Co-Creation and Community Building

I didn’t create goals this year. (*imagined gasping)

They felt heavy – a reminder of all the goals I failed to achieve in 2020. As much grace as I gave myself, I also still carried that disappointment around with me without even realizing it until I sat down to make new goals.

An awareness I uncovered in 2020 was just how futile it is for me to trudge forward with goal-based activities while feeling so heavy and serious. The pressure of the goals and the obligations I was holding myself under gave everything I did a negative charge. I was spinning my wheels when I was able to set aside time. I felt like I wasted so much time doing things that got no results, and I attribute the lack of results not to the pandemic, but to my state of mind. I backed off for a while, eliminated some toxicity from my life, and worked on expanding and making things lighter.

I am working on taking work seriously and not letting myself off the hook while also taking myself lightly – to be more in the state of flow. In a flow state, the efforts that I make have exponentially better results.

So, when goals felt heavy, I needed to reframe them. I know that having an outcome in mind is critical to staying motivated, and if you don’t know where you’re going, any road will take you there. I also know that having an outcome you believe is possible is also critical for motivation. I still needed to have achievable outcomes in mind, so I called them possibilities.

I also chose a theme for 2021: Co-creation!

The most successful parts of 2020 were because I had the support of others and many highlights were supporting others in their 2020 successes. I have a partner in Lawrence Henderson as Co-manager and Co-administrator of the C3: Corporate Consciousness Co-op group on LinkedIn, as well as a co-creator and co-host of our monthly Answer the Call to Conscious Leadership events, which have been mind-blowingly chock full of conscious wisdom, and I’ve met (virtually) so many amazing leaders thanks to our work together.

I have a great partnership with my Virtual Assistant, Cynthia Harder. If not for her… I don’t even want to think about what 2020 would have been like!

I fully endorse the power of co-creation and community for support of your 2021 goals (or possibilities.)

Guess where I found them both? Well, the article title probably gives that away.

I’m going to introduce some methods and tools (no investment needed!) that I have used to source amazing people and potential partners, and grow our LinkedIn group to 100 members organically in 7 months.

I don’t have a LinkedIn Premium account (at the moment or for most of 2020), so all of my tips can be implemented by anyone with a free account.

I advise you, before you take action on this list, to have a complete, branded LinkedIn profile.

A branded LinkedIn profile starts with identifying your unique expression of your top qualities, skills, experiences, mindsets, approaches, and talents and the value that they tend to or can create for your target audience. Epic Careering has a proprietary process for developing branding points, which are the foundation upon which all of your content and copy is crafted. This process produces a powerful psychological effect on your ideal profile visitor.

  • It creates instant resonance, which can lead to rapport.
  • It produces an incremental build-up of excitement at the possible value you can offer.
  • It induces a sense of urgency to take action (inviting you to connect).
  • It inspires more of the right people to accept YOUR invitation.
Here are the areas of your profile that you need to optimize with branded content to produce this effect:
  • The first thing people will notice about your LinkedIn profile will most likely be your photo. That is why a profile picture is a must. I recommend using a professional profile picture and a custom banner to immediately introduce visitors to your brand.
  • Your Headline is the second most visible aspect of your LinkedIn profile. It defaults to your most recent experience title, but you have 120 characters to leverage. Definitely make your role known and put it first. I say role instead of title because sometimes companies give you titles that are only understood internally or don’t accurately reflect what you actually do. Use a title that is more universal and is likely what someone would search for if they were looking for the solution that you offer. Then use the other characters to convey who you help and the outcomes you produce. If there are characters left, consider including a fun fact or hobby that will spark curiosity and let people know who the person is behind the professional, e.g. Ferry Fest Founder.
  • The About section (formerly called Summary) allows for 2500 characters (formerly 2000). Only the first 300 or so show without someone having to click “read more,” so the key is writing something that makes people want to read more! Stories, especially when they include details that appeal to the senses, are great ways to hook a reader, so think of it much like the first line of a book – the book of you. What would the first line of your memoir say? You might also start with a bold statement, compelling question, or a pithy quote. If it’s more in alignment with your brand to just get right down to business, then tell people right off the bat who you help, what they might be experiencing, what you do to help them, and the outcomes you produce. Think about the keywords that people might search for when it comes to the solutions they’re looking for and incorporate them into more detailed summaries, explaining further about emerging themes of your professional journey. Allow your personality and passion to come through. The best practice to use the first person with pronouns is based on the fact that the more approachable and relatable you are, the more invitations you send will be accepted and the more invitations to connect you will receive. (There is no obligation to accept them, of course.)
  • Your Experience section is a great place to tell stories of your triumphs. Tell the stories that demonstrate and prove your branding points. This is an opportunity to tell more of the back story, describe the challenges you had to overcome, and flesh out the results and impacts that don’t fit on your résumé. In this way, your LinkedIn profile becomes supplementary and complementary collateral that promotes your brand consistently and continues to enhance your trustworthiness and authenticity.
  • Add sections to your profile to highlight awards, publications, organizational affiliations and leadership, volunteerism, and projects. When you add projects, you can associate them with your roles, if there is a role association, and even add/tag co-creators. This is a great way to boost your and your colleagues’ visibility and give credit where it’s due.

Once you have your LinkedIn profile branded and optimized, find people with whom you want to co-create, which could be a partner, a client, a vendor, an employee, or an employer. In my case, I was using LinkedIn to find leaders out there to transform and elevate corporate leadership to invite to the C3 community.

I did a few test keyword searches, finding terms in some profile headlines like “disruptor,” “servant leader,” and “leadership development.” Then, I searched for those terms and evaluated the first several results to see if “my people” were coming up. Once I got the search just right (and this was one of my best skills as a recruiter), I then drafted a template invitation that was warm, humble, and reflective of the times. This invitation explained that I was a coach and was looking to add value to my connections by making introductions, and what introductions would be the most impactful right now. I visited the profile of the people in the results and opted to connect when that option was available (most of the time). I entered my invitation message into the Note field so that it would be sent along with the invitation to connect. If the invitation was accepted, I sent a follow-up message requesting to ask questions to see how I could help.

Once I realized that I needed a higher volume of sent invitations to get the number of accepted connections that would actually lead to back and forth conversations, I did invest in a tool, Cleverly. So, technically, this is where my efforts were inorganic and required an investment, but no one was mass invited to the group (except my mailing list, which is still primarily comprised of people that I know personally). The growth of the group was still based on 1:1 conversations and selective invitations.

The investment in Cleverly is not required to make this work for co-creation and community building, however, for me, it did accelerate it.

I copied the search URL link into a Cleverly form, then entered my invitation message template into their form and selected the number of results I wanted that message sent to daily. Once the invitation is sent, it allows you to write a follow-up message and yet another follow up when that message is answered. I only wrote one follow-up so that I could actually visit the new connection’s profile and ask questions based on what I found to make it more of a personal conversation with greater rapport.

Not everyone understood what I was doing. Some people were downright skeptical and some were really annoyed.

They just aren’t my people right now. No problem. I’d sent them a note that I was currently only looking to connect with people who are on LinkedIn to network and co-create, so no hard feelings. I disconnected from those people.

Anyone who accepted my invitation but didn’t respond to my follow up message, which was a request to ask the contact some questions, I offered grace to. I know that in any year, let alone 2020, responding to LinkedIn messages might take a back seat, and reiterated my desire to connect and get to know each other. This was appreciated by some, and those were my people. If people still didn’t respond, I let them know that while I appreciated that they would accept my invitation, I really want my network to be full of people with whom I can make a genuine connection. No hard feelings. Don’t be offended – it’s nothing personal. If I don’t hear back from you, I’ll assume that’s not you and disconnect.

Many people don’t engage on LinkedIn regularly, so I give it a good month. Once a month, I go through and disconnect with people I have not heard back from.

While many messages go unanswered, there are still a great handful of ongoing messages that allow me to find out if they are up to something I can add value to and vice versa. While engaging with other conscious leaders on LinkedIn over the past few months, I aimed to find out what the most important thing was that they were working on and if they were open to co-creating with other conscious leaders, in which case I would invite them to the C3 community.

Our live events in C3 and the opportunity to give these leaders the spotlight were the value that we offered that had them accept the invitation to the C3 community, and inspired them to invite others into the community as well.

In addition, once a topic was chosen by the community for the event, I would source a new expert to bring into the community, and they would invite others to the community as well.

I hope 2021 offers you rich relationships with new co-creators. Creating is, after all, what we’re made for.

Join the C3 Community today! Tell us what your expertise is and we’ll add it to our member survey. If it’s picked, you’ll have the opportunity to take the spotlight as a guest panelist!

Connection

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music GroupConnection · The Rolling StonesBetween The Buttons (UK Version)℗ 1967 ABKCO Music & Records Inc.Released on: 1967…

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

LinkedIn is Hiding it’s Best Features

 

I’ve noticed over the 16 years as a LinkedIn user that, though LinkedIn has and offers some of the best practices, sometimes its interface doesn’t make following those best practices intuitive. In fact, some of its best features are hidden.

Cases in point:

1. Personalizing invitations

LinkedIn’s Quick Help resources advise and warn you: “To uphold LinkedIn’s trusted community, we encourage you to only connect with people you know. By sending fewer and more thoughtful invitations, you can help us keep LinkedIn a trusted space for everyone… We’ve found that most people ignore invitations from people they don’t know. A large number of rejected invitations could result in limitations on your LinkedIn account.”

Then, on another page, it tells you how to personalize your invitation, but doesn’t tell you that many people ignore boilerplate invitations. When I mean many, I mean that I personally know hiring managers, other LinkedIn experts, other career services professionals, executives, and speakers/authors who all intentionally ignore invitations without a personalized message.

(Here are 4 great reasons to ALWAYS personalize your invitation.)

Yet the easier thing to do is click connect. You have to click again on “Add a note” to personalize your message. On the phone apps, the ability to send a personalized invitation took a surprisingly long time to become a feature. It was hidden for a while, and now it’s more visible, but still just under “Connect,” which sends a boilerplate invitation.  Importing your other contact lists sends a generic invitation in bulk.

Every…single…expert will tell you to ALWAYS personalize your invitation, and here are four good reasons why. So why wouldn’t sending and personalizing your invitation be the default option?

2. Groups

Groups are one of the most powerful features of LinkedIn that help you increase your visibility, promote your expertise and brand, and engage directly with people who can be new network connections that help you expand your network. There are three ways to get directly to groups from your desktop homepage, but none of them are obvious. LinkedIn only points out one of them. The other is by using the search bar, but groups usually show up last among the search results (this is the only way I have found to get to groups from the iPhone app.) The third is the 9-dot “work” drop-down in the upper right corner.

 

3. Knowing your contacts

LinkedIn says, ”We recommend only inviting people you know and trust because 1st-degree connections are given access to any information you’ve displayed on your profile.” They have taken steps over the years to inhibit super-connectors from expanding their networks unchecked. The LION (LinkedIn Open Networker) subculture has their reasons for accepting all invitations, but once they hit or were imposed with limits, they have to then remove people they don’t know to add people they meet and for whom have genuine reasons to stay connected.  They then had to tell people, “Sorry – I’m at my limit.”

I have openly heard their side, however, I have found that by knowing my network, my efforts to connect with or connect other people are often successful and my network has grown into a healthy community of over 1400. I am “found” by many people (enough for my bandwidth) and my search results are rich with relevant people, even without an upgraded account.  Here are other reasons I have chosen to fill my network with people with whom I have personally interacted and what I do when I receive an invitation from someone I don’t know. As we’ll discuss in a bit, invitations like these are a good sign.

Some of the changes that LinkedIn has made have penalized people who have added too many people. However, they don’t leverage their navigation or user experience to prevent this. You used to have to adjust settings to only allow people you know a certain way to invite you, and when you sent an invitation you used to have to select how you know them. Certain selections would require you to put their e-mail address. However, people have multiple e-mail addresses and not all of them may be connected to your LinkedIn account. This might be why this is gone, or it could be because the super-connected LIONs are connected enough to be a threat and have successfully influenced interface design to make it easy to connect with anyone, whether you know them or not.

Sidebar: You’ll find Steven Burda and Jason Alba, both quoted in the article linked above on LIONs, in my network because I have had real-world interactions with both of them. In fact, Steven was my neighbor. Our daughters are in girl scouts together. Jason and I connected years ago about his job searching software. I was the 2nd guest on his podcast, Ask the Experts.

4. Stats

Whether you have a free or upgraded account, LinkedIn shows you how many people viewed your profile and posts. Views alone, however, are not a great way to measure the effectiveness of your profile content or activities on LinkedIn for what you probably want to achieve – professional opportunity. What is more relevant is how many invitations you receive in proportion to profile views. This will tell you if your profile brand and content is compelling. This is a quantitative measurement, but qualitatively, if you want to know if your brand is effective, evaluate how well the people who invite you align with your target audience(s) and profiles.

Something else LinkedIn will show you in notifications is when people interact with your dynamic content – status updates, posts and comments. It will show you, again, how many views, but with each interaction that takes a bit more effort, you can see how effective your posts are at increasing your visibility (because more engagement means more visibility as other people’s networks will see their activity in relation to your post and it may even show up on other people’s home feeds as a result), promoting your expertise, and engaging with people who have a high probability of adding value to your professional goals, as well as the goals of your other connections. Likes are the easiest to give. LinkedIn has now added other reactions (that sometimes don’t work for me) and takes just slightly more effort. Commenting, now that LinkedIn has autosuggestions, takes about as much effort, but obviously making a custom comment requires thoughtfulness – a large increase in effort. Tagging others doesn’t take as much effort, but is a great testament to the value of your content and does an even better job of increasing views of your content. Again, though, more views without engagement can be more of a sign of content that could use improvement, such as a call to action.

LinkedIn will count post and status update comments, but remember to evaluate your qualitatively as well.  Analyze your results so that you can continue to improve how your content and activity supports your professional objectives.

What are some great LinkedIn features that aren’t so obvious?

 

You’ve got to hide your love away – The Beatles (LYRICS/LETRA) [Original]

THE INSTRUMENTS IN THIS SONG ARE FROM THE MOST HONORABLE RIOHEY KANAYAMA PLEASE SUSCRIBE TO HIM: https://www.youtube.com/user/goldmine196909 If you liked this song, I invite you to listen the rest of Beatles songs subtitled into english and spanish, following the link below: ► https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qyPusDodDk&list=PL632iTavofD48JGlFY4VkYDKxoWfX17a1 TAGS: You’ve got to hide your love away, the beatles,, the beatles You’ve got to hide your love away, los beatles, os beatles, the beatles lyrics, los beatles letra, o beatles legendado, beatles, beatles john lennon, beatles paul mccartney, beatles ringo starr, beatles george harrison, yoko ono

Karen Huller, author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days (bit.ly/GetFocusIn30), is founder of Epic Careering, a corporate consulting and career management firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, as well as JoMo Rising, LLC, a workflow gamification company that turns work into productive play. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. 

Karen was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends in hiring and careering. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She is an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and previously was an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is also an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy where her students won the 2018 national competition and were named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs.