Archives for equality

Equal Pay Day 2022

Today is Equal Pay Day. You may say, but, Karen, the Equal Pay Act was passed in 1963. Yes, I know.

Like many other movements of the 60s, we haven’t made great strides since then.

(Personally, I think we could use a modern folk movement to catalyze greater change. Music is a powerful force underutilized today.)

Besides the fact that women still earn 82 cents to a man’s dollar, there are many other inequities that have become even more evident through the pandemic, in part causing 1.8 million women to abandon the workforce who have yet to return today.

Take a look at the top leadership of companies. How many are dominated by women? Usually, it is those started by women. Now take a look at the lower levels of the same company. How do they compare? Statistically, women dominate lower-wage jobs.

This morning on the Philadelphia-based Preston & Steve Show, members of the cast and callers shared anecdotes about people (mostly women) who turned down opportunities because they required sacrifices of family time and overall wellness.

How are companies still expecting people (men and women) to put work before the most important job of all – preparing our kids to be stewards of the planet and each other?

Why does any corporate job really require someone to sacrifice a healthy lifestyle in these times of automation and remote technology? The answer is… it’s not required. And there are enough case studies today to prove that companies can prosper because they take care of their people and the planet.

Maybe I’m wrong, but it seems to me that the increase in mental illness witnessed and measured globally has something to do with cultures that demand performance over personal priorities. And we wonder why school shootings and other mass public shootings in the US weren’t “a thing” back in the day yet are scarily too prevalent now. Of course, there are many other factors, but no matter where you stand on gun control, mental illness is an undeniable influence on these events.

Let me say this for the people in the back – PROFITS are not more important than PEOPLE!

In fact, one might argue that if you let the population go to hell in a handbasket, you are not only going to burn out your talent, who may sabotage your progress consciously or unconsciously, but you will also eliminate future consumers who drive your profits.

I know we’re all sick of beating on the Great Recession drum, but someone didn’t get the memo that people and our society can’t sustain the workplace demands of the past 20 years. Want to help them get the message? TAKE A STAND. You don’t have to work for companies that aren’t adapting to the changing needs of the workforce. Some of you actually are positioned to be a change agent in your company and have the potential to change things for the better for everyone there.

Seriously. That is what I am here for, and there are plenty of other career and leadership coaches poised and ready to help you give your talent, time, and energy to a company and/or a cause that gives you back what you give to it, and then some.

Take the next step now. Schedule a consultation.

And if you’re a woman in Delaware, attend one of the compensation negotiation trainings I will be doing in April for the Office of Women’s Advancement and Advocacy.

Close the gaps. There is more than one.

  • We need family-friendly policies that support both mom and dad’s ability to be there for their kids, who are the future of our planet and your company.
  • We need women to be given opportunities in top levels of leadership that enable them to be a whole person. Other countries do this much better than the US!
  • We obviously need women to get the same pay for the same work!

Come on, now. It’s 2022! My oldest daughter is in the class of 2028. The days of her entering the workforce are coming quickly, and we’ve got a lot of work to do!

Whitney Houston – Greatest Love Of All (Official Video)

“Greatest Love Of All” by Whitney HoustonListen to Whitney Houston: https://WhitneyHouston.lnk.to/listenYDWatch more Whitney Houston videos: https://WhitneyH…

Karen Huller, CEO of Epic Careering, is the co-founder of The Consciousness Conference (ConCon) and the C3: Corporate Consciousness Co-op community on LinkedIn. She is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a conscious career and leadership development firm specializing in executive branding, talent-values alignment, and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of Mrs. Huller’s 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

Mrs. Huller was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She serves on the board for the Upper Merion Community Center, which she helped establish, and is an advisor to Florida International University for their Women in Leadership program. For her service as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. Mrs. Huller has also been the lead singer for Harpers Ferry, a rock cover band, for 20 years. She lives in King of Prussia, PA with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Why We Need Black History Month

Happy February 2022. When February was declared Black History Month in 1986, President Ronald Reagan said “the foremost purpose of Black History Month is to make all Americans aware of this struggle for freedom and equal opportunity.”

We still have a lot of work to do toward equity. Dropping the ball on DEI means suppressing the contributions of Black Americans. Keep going! Hold your organizations accountable for their commitments. Black History Month is a great opportunity to catalyze momentum.

Please take a moment to read the below article from World Economic Forum and consider the vast contributions of Black Americans.

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Black History Month: What is it and why do we need it?

By Alem Tedeneke Media Lead, Canada, Latin America and Sustainable Development Goals, World Economic Forum

February is Black History Month. This month-long observance in the US and Canada is a chance to celebrate Black achievement and provide a fresh reminder to take stock of where systemic racism persists and give visibility to the people and organizations creating change.

Here’s what to know about Black History Month and how to celebrate it this year:

How did Black History Month begin?

Black History Month’s first iteration was Negro History Week, created in February 1926 by Carter G. Woodson, known as the “father of Black history.” This historian helped establish the field of African American studies and his organization, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, aimed to encourage “people of all ethnic and social backgrounds to discuss the Black experience“.

“Those who have no record of what their forebears have accomplished lose the inspiration which comes from the teaching of biography and history.”
― Carter G. Woodson

His organization was later renamed the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASAALH) and is currently the oldest historical society established for the promotion of African American history.

Why is Black History Month in February?

February was chosen by Woodson for the week-long observance as it coincides with the birthdates of both former US President Abraham Lincoln and social reformer Frederick Douglass. Both men played a significant role in helping to end slavery.

Woodson also understood that members of the Black community already celebrated the births of Douglass and Lincoln and sought to build on existing traditions. “He was asking the public to extend their study of Black history, not to create a new tradition”, as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASAALH) explained on its website.

How did Black History Month become a national month of celebration?

By the late 1960s, thanks in part to the civil-rights movement and a growing awareness of Black identity, Negro History Week was celebrated by mayors in cities across the country. Eventually, the event evolved into Black History Month on many college campuses.

In 1976, President Gerald Ford officially recognized Black History month. In his speech, President Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of Black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history”.

Since his administration, every American president has recognized Black History Month and its mission. But it wasn’t until Congress passed “National Black History Month” into law in 1986 that many in the country began to observe it formally. The law aimed to make all Americans “aware of this struggle for freedom and equal opportunity“.

Why is Black History Month celebrated?

Initially, Black History Month was a way of teaching students and young people about Black and African-Americans’ contributions. Such stories had been largely forgotten and were a neglected part of the national narrative.

Now, it’s seen as a celebration of those who’ve impacted not just the country but the world with their activism and achievements. In the US, the month-long spotlight during February is an opportunity for people to engage with Black histories, go beyond discussions of racism and slavery, and highlight Black leaders and accomplishments.

What is this year’s Black History Month theme?

Every year, a theme is chosen by the ASAALH, the group originally founded by Woodson. This year’s theme, “Black Health and Wellness,” focuses on the importance of Black Health and Wellness by acknowledging the legacy of Black scholars but also “other ways of knowing (e.g., birthworkers, doulas, midwives, naturopaths, herbalists, etc.) throughout the African Diaspora.”

The month’s event will also examine how healthcare has often underserved the Black community.

Is Black History Month celebrated anywhere else?

In Canada, they celebrate it in February. In countries like the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Ireland, they celebrate it in October. In Canada, African-Canadian parliament member Jean Augustine motioned for Black History Month in 1995 to bring awareness to Black Canadians’ work.

When the UK started celebrating Black History Month in 1987, it focused on Black American history. Over time there has been more attention on Black British history. Now it is dedicated to honouring African people’s contributions to the country. Its UK mission statement is: “Dig deeper, look closer, think bigger”.

Why is Black History Month important?

For many modern Black millennials, the month-long celebration for Black History Month offers an opportunity to reimagine what possibilities lie ahead. But for many, the forces that drove Woodson nearly a century ago are more relevant than ever.

As Lonnie G. Bunch III, Director of the Smithsonian Institution said at the opening of the Washington D.C.’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in 2016: “There is no more powerful force than a people steeped in their history. And there is no higher cause than honouring our struggle and ancestors by remembering”.

All credit to: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/01/black-history-month-what-is-it-and-why-do-we-need-it/

A Change Is Gonna Come

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music GroupA Change Is Gonna Come · Sam Cooke30 Greatest Hits: Portrait of a Legend 1951-1964℗ 2008 ABKCO Music & Records, I…

Karen Huller, CEO of Epic Careering, is the co-founder of The Consciousness Conference (ConCon) and the C3: Corporate Consciousness Co-op community on LinkedIn. She is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a conscious career and leadership development firm specializing in executive branding, talent-values alignment, and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of Mrs. Huller’s 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

Mrs. Huller was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She serves on the board for the Upper Merion Community Center, which she helped establish, and is an advisor to Florida International University for their Women in Leadership program. For her service as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. Mrs. Huller has also been the lead singer for Harpers Ferry, a rock cover band, for 20 years. She lives in King of Prussia, PA with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Improving Access to Resources and Opportunity – Answer The Call To Conscious Leadership

I’m going to recommend something I haven’t before – even if you attended live, I recommend that you watch the replay of this month’s Answer the Call to Conscious Leadership – Improving Access to Resources and Opportunity. The replay, as usual, is posted in our C3 Community on LinkedIn, so if you’re not there, request membership today.

About 20 minutes into the event, and 15 major insights later, I realized what an opportunity it was to be able to listen with greater presence to what was shared. Some points were just begging to be reinforced with another listen, while other major insights were so surrounded by other major insights that I missed them during the live event.

C3 members and this month’s panelists, Dominique “D” Ross, Personal and Professional Development champion and Sharon Clinton, Deputy Executive Director and change-maker for the City of Philadelphia, shared critical perspectives on how to improve access to resources and opportunity whether you are a leader in charge of assessing and executing greater access for your teams and communities or whether you are an individual with access challenges and obstacles of your own.

Here is what we discussed:
  • Why is a change is necessary for today’s time?
  • What is the distinction between equality and equity?
  • What are the three major components to improving your own access to opportunity?
  • If you don’t have a mentor, where can you find one?
  • What is the danger of adults projecting their baggage (limits) onto youth?
  • What’s wrong with conventional ideas about providing equity today?
  • Do you give people something additional to overcome the barriers, or do you remove the barriers?
  • What does it take to understand the meaning of access to opportunity?
  • How does the Horatio Alger DEI exercise teach people about equity and privilege?
  • How do we gain an understanding of how far an individual has to go to achieve equitable opportunity and at what time?
  • How can you determine how to maximize ROI on the investment in providing equitable opportunity?
  • How can you manage the multitude of valid experiences and do something productive with the collective brain dump of ideas while still giving people an equitable contribution?
  • How do you decide what kind of effort are you trying to make and what will be sustainable based on capacity?
  • How do you bucket the ideas and what model is best to evaluate the ideas?
  • What is the best tool to assess your teams to provide equitable opportunity?
  • What is the best mindset when you face challenges and obstacles in elevating your own access to opportunity?
  • What are the personal and systemic challenges our panelists had to overcome to achieve their level of career achievement?
  • How can you synthesize the plethora of advice you may receive in your quest to elevate our opportunity?
  • How can you use what you know about yourself to overcome challenges that pose a threat to your success?
  • In the midst of all of the moving pieces necessary to create a more equitable world, where do you start?
  • After starting, what was the next step our panelists gave themselves permission to take?
  • When you have to pivot and start from scratch, you may be losing, but what are you gaining?
  • How can you get to a point of mastery in elevating your own opportunity?

I’m going to go ahead and answer that last one without you having to watch the replay, though I still encourage you to: Gain mastery by using the C3 Community as a place to practice! Take your ideas, find a co-creator in the group, and take Sharon’s advice and get STARTED!  How’s today?

Book recommendations:

The time to get into the C3 Community is now. There will be no better chance to be a panelist and a potential speaker for our 2021 C3 Telesummit than now while we are still relatively small.

THE SENSATIONS – ”LET ME IN” (1962)

“Let Me In” is the name of a 1962 song with music and lyrics by Yvonne Baker, recorded by Baker and The Sensations, which went to #4 on the U.S. Billboard Ho…

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.