Archives for engagement

15 Ways to Leverage the C3 Community to Accelerate Consciousness and Your Career

 

In 6 months, Lawrence and I grew the C3: Corporate Consciousness Co-op Community to over 100 people, and we’re still growing.

This group’s vision was to put together leaders who have individually created their own ripples to elevate corporations’ consciousness and recognize that by working together, these ripples become larger, faster, and more powerful waves of transformation.

It’s for those who share a sense of urgency about how quickly we as a planet need to outpace technology, climate change, and greed before we destroy ourselves. 2020 was the largest global challenge we’ve experienced in our lifetime, but there is every reason to believe that other, perhaps greater, challenges lie ahead. We need leaders willing to sacrifice popularity and security for effectiveness in creating change.

The C3 community is not for wish-makers but action-takers. We are in it for the mutual value we are creating. Not only do we get to go further and faster together, but we also get to promote our own initiatives to garner more significant support. We get to support our counterparts’ professional endeavors to help them get further on their journey, as well.

Our goal for 2021 is to expand this group while maintaining quality, which we will measure by engagement. We don’t just want any members who request to join. We want those who are willing to participate and willing to add value.

Once you are in the community, you’ll be invited to engage in a few different ways. We’ll also use these guidelines to assess our engagement and growth success.

Introduce yourself. Reintroduce yourself.

Once your membership is approved, you will be welcomed, tagged, and asked to let the community know what topics and practices related to conscious leadership that you like to speak on. When you do this, your topics are truncated down to 30 characters and are added to our topics poll. This past month we had so many topics we split them into 3 polls and down to a final poll. Topics that have votes (or relevance/timeliness in their favor) are carried over to the next month, but they won’t always, especially as we expand.

If you were an original member, you might have only introduced yourself to a few people, whereas now there are over 100! So hop back on and reintroduce yourself! You may have also thought about other niche topics you want to speak on. Go ahead and share!

We aren’t threatening to delete anyone right now, but because of our engagement goals and our commitment to filling this community with co-creating action-takers, we may eventually do some house cleaning. Don’t just be a passive observer. Stay active and add value!

Read other people’s introductions

None of us have reached complete conscious leadership enlightenment, yet we all have valuable expertise. Someone right here in the community may be an expert in something that you are struggling with right now. As long as we maintain the group’s quality by ensuring that members are all committed to the same thing, co-creation, expect a warm reception to an invitation to exchange expertise. Follow up when you receive such an invitation, as well.

Vote in event topic polls

Vote for yourself or vote for someone else. Just vote! The point of voting is to ensure that our content co-creation is what you desire, even demand, based on what challenges are relevant to you in your conscious leadership journey. On the other hand, say you really want to hear about a topic, but you know you won’t be available on the first Thursday of the month at 1 PM ET, vote for another topic.

Did you refer someone into C3 because you knew that the community would add value to them and vice versa? Vote for them! Remember that a vote for a topic is also a vote for a member.

Spread the word

As I’ve said, we are not interested in growth alone. We do not want to dilute our community with people who are not practicing and promoting conscious leadership. We don’t want people who are more interested in serving their own brand interests than contributing to the movement.

If you know someone who sees issues in the corporate world that we cannot continue to facilitate, wants to serve better and is willing to reach their hand out, they are who we want in this community! We want to combine our expertise and knowledge, and help bring new people into the movement to change the way we work in the corporate world! Send them this link: http://bit.ly/LI_C3

Attend the events and comment/ask questions

Lawrence knows what he’s doing on Streamyard! He makes the radio operator in me proud, watching him keep his thumb on the conversation while also posting relevant links and tracking the comments. All while highlighting the nuggets of wisdom and thought-provoking questions of our audience. We would love to see expansion in participation and conversation-starting questions during these events!

Several of our panelists started as people who were engaging in the events! Visibility is part of the value we intend to provide to you, your experience, and your expertise. We create a safe space for people to share a different perspective. We believe that this is completely necessary if we are to achieve consciousness in the workplace.

Watch the replays

Each month, I list the questions we answered or even questions that beg for more answers. If you go down that list and find anything curious, go back and check it out! Let’s keep the conversation going in the comments. Share your thoughts and reflections. Share your tips!

Share the event summaries

The event summaries are meant to entice anyone in C3 who didn’t attend to watch. These summaries are also shared across social media to drive like-minded professionals to the group. Share it either individually to people who would appreciate the insights or publicly on your own social media pages (with relevant audiences).

Engage with us on Clubhouse and Twitter

Lawrence and I are everywhere, but there are a few places where we include the flow of our daily lives. We have collectively and individually created some ancillary outreach to continue finding new conscious co-creators for our community.

Every other Tuesday at 1:15, Lawrence (@bossllab) and I (@ripplemaker) jump off our telesummit strategy call and into a Clubhouse room. We talk about the tenets of conscious leadership and crowdsource ideas for keynotes and breakouts. If you are on this platform, follow us both and put our next event, March 9th, on your calendar. We’re talking about psychological safety and whatever else seems important to discuss.

This Wednesday at 11 AM ET, I’m re-starting Twitter Chats, at least experimentally. I’d like to see what the Twitterverse has to say about conscious leadership. Find the chat by searching #ConsciousLeaderChat just before 11 AM. You can also follow me @EpicCareering and engage from my profile tweet.

Share relevant articles/blogs – even your own – just ask a thoughtful question

The problem with many of the other groups for practitioners I am in is that it becomes a blog dumping ground. Everyone shares their blog, and no one engages. I mean, post after post with no engagement, not even likes!

For this reason, many group managers have prohibited promoting external links at all.

We are pro-promotion, which is rare. And, we get where these group managers are coming from, as well. When you share a post or article, start a discussion or ask a question, be sure to tag people with relevant experience and ask them to share their opinions or experiences.

Invite other members to connect

Connecting obviously makes it easier to co-create. As an OG LinkedIn trainer, I encourage you to add a note and explain your intentions. Mention the C3 community. If we manage this community right, you will find warm receptions to these invitations.

Promote your event

Do you know of other groups or organizations’ conscious leadership events? Let us know! Knowledge-share is yet another critical value of this community.

Attend someone’s event

When you see an event posted, and you have the time available, go. Engage. Let people know what we’re doing here. Bring a few great people back with you, especially insightful speakers. Talk up the C3 member who is hosting or speaking. Share with us a summary of the event. Give those of us who couldn’t attend an overview of what we missed and pieces of value!

Co-create a new event

We don’t have a monopoly on events in C3. If another topic is in demand, and you are an expert in that topic, create a new event. Even better, consider co-creating that event with some of the people who also voted for it. You can host it and invite others to be panelists, or you can ask someone else to host so that you can be a panelist and bring in other panelists – or not. We have found that we have tremendously enjoyable and valuable banter with 4 perspectives contributing, but that’s not a rule.

Give us more ideas

Most other LinkedIn groups that I am in are not very active. On the other hand, many of the Facebook groups I am in are very active, yet the group I created (Raising Corporate Consciousness) had nearly no engagement over several months. If you see other groups doing things to nurture co-creation, engagement, and value, please let us know about it.

If you see a post or event outside the group you feel is worth mimicking, post it yourself. We are not here to hog the spotlight; quite the opposite. We are here to elevate YOU!

Volunteer

With more ideas, we’ll need more volunteers to help support execution. With more volunteers, we can do more events and highlight more of our members. There are already ideas on the table for which we could use man/woman power, for instance – a structured mentor program.

There are gaps in our ability to engage on all platforms to promote the C3 community and our value. We are a part of many other platforms such as Slack, Quora, and Reddit. If you are savvy with any of these platforms, let us know. We can talk about how you can leverage the time you are already spending to add value to the community while also using the community to add value to your career and conscious leadership momentum.

Future Vision:

As of now, there is no monetization for this group. In fact, Lawrence and I engage our assistants’ help to help us manage the administration and promotion of this group, so it’s operating at a cost. This means we do not have a budget to pay for speakers.

However, stay tuned for an announcement about a June telesummit. This will be an event born from the C3 community that illuminates the thought-leadership, expertise, and value of its members.

C3 won’t be the best-kept secret forever, and the odds of having your topic chosen as our monthly topic will go down as membership goes up.

Take advantage of being a charter member of this group. Consider yourself at the forefront of this wave of conscious corporate change we are co-creating.

Amongst The Waves

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music GroupAmongst The Waves · Pearl JamBackspacer℗ 2009 Monkeywrench, Inc.Released on: 2009-09-20Producer: Brenden O’BrienC…

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Ditch the Drama – Part 2 Recap of the PA Conference for Women 2018

The breakout session spoke to me: “Ditch Workplace Drama and Drive Results”

Oh, Hallelujah!

Now, it has been a long time since I had to deal with drama with any regularity, having not been a full-time employee for over 12 years. However, even as a subcontractor and volunteer, just the interacting with other humans for the sake of collaborating on projects of mutual interest and benefit seems to expose me to drama.

As I shared last week on part 1 of my PA Conference for Women recap, I was thirsty for tools and information I could put to use and share right away.

I have met a new woman, Cy Wakeman, whose database of knowledge and habits I would love to instantly download. And I was exposed to a term that resonates so strongly with my quest to use every second for the utmost outcome, whether that outcome is fun, productivity, co-creating, vitality, adventure, or intimacy.

Behavioral economics – a study dedicated to understanding and adjusting the time it takes humans to make decisions, take actions, and communicate words that accelerate progress and results while eliminating poor outcomes and wasteful actions and communications. (My paraphrased definition.)

What’s even better, is that it ties data to practices that are proven, but considered a bit fringe for most corporate environments – being in your highest self.

Whaaaa?

Not only that, but she debunked so many popular corporate myths about engagement, accountability, leadership, open-door policies, and more. I wish everyone could have been there. It was EPIC.

As usual, if you read my blogs/posts or follow me on Twitter, you get the benefit of attending even if you weren’t there because I captured as many golden nuggets as possible. My blog is one of my favorite ways to re-teach what I learn to share the wealth, but also to reinforce what I learn. I do this with my speaking engagements, as well. A room full of Human Resources professionals will benefit Friday from this download of de-dramatization techniques. It’s a shame I had to hand in my pitch deck several weeks ago, but I will find ways to weave it in. What Cy had to share is relevant to ALL people and all relationships. It’s life-changing! Thankfully, 450K+ people get to hear her message each year with her 250-day/year speaking schedule.

I look forward to reading my signed copy of No Ego: How Leaders Can Cut the Costs of Workplace Drama, End Entitlement, and Drive Results.

Below are my tweets of the good stuff you would have missed if you weren’t there:

Green Day – Drama Queen ( Lyrics )

Uploaded by umaro seidi on 2012-11-21.

Karen Huller, author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days (bit.ly/GetFocusIn30), is founder of Epic Careering, a corporate consulting and career management firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, as well as JoMo Rising, LLC, a workflow gamification company that turns work into productive play. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. 

Karen was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends in hiring and careering. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business, will be an Associate Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department in 2019,  and is also an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy where her students won the 2018 national competition and were named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs.

 

Exit Interviews: 6 Questions to Gain the Utmost Value From Lost Talent

Peace-Out

I help talent leave. For many of them, change is hard. It inconveniences them, disrupts their rhythms, and makes them feel very uncomfortable and uncertain, even if it excites them at the same time. By the time people come to me to help them, they are usually in pain. Sometimes it’s even physical.

Most people will try everything else before they actually follow through with any plans to leave, unless they are getting tapped by recruiters who wave more money and better conditions and growth opportunities at them.

Resignation – a great word that describes both the state of mind of people who decide that there are few to no options left, and the act of leaving a job itself.

According to CultureAmp data, the top reasons talent leaves a company are lack of growth opportunities, poor leadership, and poor managers, in that order. Sometimes the managers or leaders get blamed for a poor or non-existent talent development system.

There is more loss to talent resignation than just losing a single person, their skill, their intelligence, and their experience. I speak about that here. The bleeding can be profuse.

The best way to control the bleeding, if you can’t stop it, is to conduct, or have a 3rd party conduct, exit interviews.

I asked the Quora community what they would tell their former boss if they could be sure there would be no negative consequences. One person answered and another upvoted that they wouldn’t burn a bridge by giving them negative feedback. Yes, the question was specific about their being no negative consequences, but it just goes to show that some people will still fear consequences, even if you tell them there are none. For this reason, you may want to engage a firm like Epic Careering to procure more truthful feedback.

If you want to keep the feedback coming and truly prevent future losses of talent, don’t punish employees and former employees with negative references or diminished separation packages. In fact, go the other direction.

Offer any separated talent an incentive to provide comprehensive feedback via an exit interview. A moral incentive is that their leaving is not in vein and it will serve the people they have to leave behind. Many of my clients’ driving reason for staying in a job so long is because of the people they feel they may now screw over by leaving.

A monetary incentive may be more effective, but you have to make sure people don’t feel paid off for a positive review. It may even be better for the monetary incentive to come from the 3rd party in the way of a $100 gift card, much the way surveys and studies do it.

If you decide to conduct your own, even if through your company’s human resources department, here are primary questions to ask:

  1. What could the company or your manager have done differently to prevent you from wanting to leave?
  2. Did you confront your manager about your reasons for wanting to leave prior to making the decision, and, if not, why not?
  3. What do you think the company and its leaders can do to make X a better company to work for?
  4. Would you refer a friend or family member to this company as either a customer or employee? If so, why, and if not, why not?
  5. Is there anyone you would like to recommend to fill your position? Please provide their name, contact information and why you feel they would be a good fit.
  6. What was the best part of working for this company?

Exit interviews aren’t the only way to uncover why the company is losing talent so that an effective solution can be identified. Glassdoor is another way, but by the time the information is out there, it’s for the whole world to see.

If someone really feels strongly about their experience, good or bad this may or may not prevent them from going straight to Glassdoor with their rating. However, giving them this outlet may prevent those who would use Glassdoor simply to help leaders learn a lesson for the sake of all who remain and all who may consider employment.

If you don’t currently have a way for employees to share their feedback while still on the job, you are probably guessing how to keep your employees. Some companies guess wrong and think that benefits are going to keep employees around.

This is what we refer to as “golden handcuffs.” They may keep employees around longer than they would, but they don’t keep employees engaged. Engagement surveys can help you assess this, but not all are created equally, and still, if they are conducted internally, as I share in the video I mentioned above, the honesty a company needs to prevent future losses of talent can be muted. Delegate to a 3rd party firm like Epic Careering.

Pet Shop Boys – What have I done to deserve this?

Lyrics You always wanted a lover I only wanted a job I’ve always worked for my living How’m I gonna get through? How’m I gonna get through? I come here looking for money (Got to have it) and end up leaving with love Now you’ve left me with nothing (Can’t take it) How’m I gonna get through?

Karen Huller, author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days (bit.ly/GetFocusIn30), is founder of Epic Careering, a corporate consulting and career management firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, as well as JoMo Rising, LLC, a workflow gamification company that turns work into productive play. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. 

Karen was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends in hiring and careering. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer and Certified Career Transition Consultant and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business, will be an Associate Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department in 2019,  and is also an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy where her students won the 2018 national competition and were named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs.

Me Inc. – How to get started with personal branding

 

Personal branding has been the “Buzz du Jour” lately on LinkedIn.  Numerous career coaches,

Chris Dag - Headshot-1-candid-square from Flickr

Chris Dag – Headshot-1-candid-square from Flickr

brand evangelists, etc. have been posting their content in discussion groups stressing the need for people to establish their credibility via various social networks comparable to a company/consumer brand.  Interesting given I first learned this concept back in 1997 when I picked up an issue of Fast Company at LAX and read an article by management guru Tom Peters.  The article was titled The Brand Called YouWhat has changed in the last sixteen years?  From my point of view, little!  The concept of personal branding remains the same.  We now have more touch points to manage thanks to the collaborative tools of Web 2.0.

May I share what I believe are the key components of personal branding or what I title the marketing of Me Inc.:

  1. Self-Analysis – Start by answering a basic question: Who am I?  Take out a piece of paper and jot down all the characteristics that make you, you!  Suggestion: Focus on what really makes you different.  An example: Analytical, keen sense of humor, extroverted, love sports, special interests, etc.
  2. Roadmap Development – Now that you know what you are all about, it is time to drill down and answer two tougher questions: What do I want to be when I grow up (a.k.a. vision statement)?  How am I going to get there (a.k.a. mission statement)?
  3. Reputation Management – The easy part.  Figure out both online and offline where you can increase your visibility based on what you learned via self-analysis and roadmap development.  Join LinkedIn Groups that will enable you to engage and aggregate information with other people who are analytical.  Read blogs written by market researchers (note: don’t forget to engage by leaving comments).  Join a local sports team in a sport that you enjoy.  Volunteer to captain or coach the team to hone your leadership skills.  In the process of reputation management you will develop persona.
  4. Commitment – The final component is to stay committed.  Too many things happen on one’s adventure that distracts people from achieving their roadmap.   That is why they call it life.  Be flexible, but remember, stay committed!  Commitment = Focus!

Are you ready to start Me Inc.?  Good luck!