Archives for compassion

Is 2021 the Year You Join the Conscious Leadership Movement?

Where could we be right now if the world had an abundance of, rather than a lack of, conscious leaders?

Can you imagine where we Americans would be if most Americans trusted our leader? Where would we be if our leader gave us science-backed advice arrived at through a transparent protocol on how to come out of the pandemic faster and stronger than ever?

We can see how this played out in New Zealand, where the Kiwis have declared victory over COVID and have fully returned to life without mitigation efforts and restrictions.

Sweden’s King and Prime Minister admitted that keeping the country open was the wrong decision and his people are paying the price. While the wrong decision may have been made, admitting this mistake IS conscious leadership because it potentially helps others from suffering the same fate. It also puts the citizens on a better path in complying with life-saving measures instituted late, but better than never.

Here’s a more pressing question – Where will we be 3-5 years from now if we continue to lack conscious leaders? Could 2025 somehow be worse than 2020?

  • How many more scandals will arise, and what will they cost in lives, money, and progress?
  • Will citizens go to war with each other?
  • Will other countries take greater advantage of the instability?
  • Will we still be battling a pandemic?
  • What will happen to the business owners who had to close their doors due to COVID and all the employees that are displaced as a result?
  • Will more and more populations be victims of climate change?

Has 2020 made this gap in conscious leadership more obvious to you in a way that’s personal? Did you personally struggle to make conscious decisions as a leader?

I’ve been calling 2020 the year of perfect hindsight. If we are truly going to take the pain and the loss of 2020 to create better years ahead for us and generations to come, we have to fill organizations, governments, and institutions with conscious leaders.

I have a plan, a course, and a certification program that has the potential to put 97,650 Certified Conscious Leaders in greater positions of positive influence toward a better world and 78,555 more Certified Conscious Leadership Trainers out there continuing the movement by 2025.

My question to you is, is 2021 the year you join the movement?

Did you see something that you can’t unsee and you can no longer ignore?

Do you know for certain that something has to change, but you are not sure how to manage your career from this point forward?

Join me virtually on Wednesday, January 6th at 2:00 PM ET to find out how you can be on the forefront as a co-founder of the conscious leadership movement. You’ll also discover where that can lead you in your career and your legacy of creating a better world, and how many of those Certified Conscious Leaders and Certified Conscious Leadership Trainers you can personally add to leadership worldwide in just 4 years, and what’s possible beyond that.

Register today and add it to your calendar now!

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Finding Your Place in a Volatile World

Humor me. Let’s take a little trip in our minds…

Imagine being on permanent vacation on a lush island in the Pacific somewhere around paradise.

There are people at sea level on the beach and people up at the top of a mountain where you get 360-degree views of everything around. Then there are the people in between who commute from beach to mountain top, ushering others up and down – the docents.

The mountain is steep and rough terrain. The top is paradise – everything you could ever need and want is up there – fresh, drinkable waterfalls, plentiful food, and peace. At the top of the island, they work together to protect and preserve paradise and their abundant lives. They are grateful and they do not take for granted the bounty with which they are bestowed. They are in communion with the land and each other.

It was not easy to get there. They had to find great inner-strength to battle not only physical feats, but also to fight their inner demons. Once they reach the top, they see how worth it was to push through the challenges. Now, looking down the mountain at those attempting to climb up, they wish they could encourage them to believe how worth it is to keep going. They carved a path for others to follow, but it’s more clearly visible from the top, and very hard to find from below. Sometimes they forget just how hard it was and all the times they almost quit.

The people on the beach are grateful, too, but life is harder down there. Every so often a storm or tidal wave comes and wipes out all that they saved in terms of food, which is much more scarce. They have to rebuild their shelter and their spirit.

The docents are people who know where the carved paths are and choose not to stay atop the mountain in paradise, but instead to travel back down to help people up.

You see, the further up you go, the better your perspective. Some docents go all the way down to the beach and are very good at getting the people on the beach to follow them and make it all the way to the top, but most docents only help in getting people a little bit further along. Even then, the people climbing up the mountain are much more inspired to keep going, because they already see that the end of the journey will be worth the effort. Lastly, there are people who are too weak for the trek, people who just believe they are too weak for the trek, and people who do not want to leave their loved ones who are too weak for the trek.

It’s an uncoordinated effort, but if the docents worked together, they could make sure that everyone gets off the beach and up the mountain to where life is better and perspective is stronger. The higher up you go, the better you can see a storm or tidal wave approaching and the safer you are. In fact, science predicts that they are going to become much more frequent.

In a coordinated effort, each docent would train others in multiple paths, and the increased traffic would make the paths wider and easier to transverse. Docents would co-create solutions to get people who are too weak for the trek up the mountain. This would require their time and probably some resources from up above, like food and supplies.

Why do we want to get all the people off of the beach? Because tidal waves are sure to come again. Storms are sure to come again.

In a docent’s journey and mission to help people from the shore reach the mountaintop, it’s common for them to get stuck. Sure, they know the way, but they still face the challenges that continue to exist while ascending the mountain. It’s important to practice self-care and to notice when you are putting yourself at risk of not making it back up the mountain yourself. If you get stuck on the beach trying to get everyone to follow you, it could be hard to tell if you should put yourself at risk for a small crew of willing followers or stay on the beach putting yourself at risk of getting swept away by overwhelm, chaos and change, and not getting back up to safety for yourself.

For docents who find themselves stuck with these challenges of going back down and up, especially on their first few journeys, it is critical to accurately assess your own resilience, stamina, energy, and resources. You may need to get yourself back up the mountain to nourish yourself, allow paradise to raise your vibe, remind you what’s possible, and gain greater perspective again. From there, it would be easier to strategize a path down and back up that requires less effort.

Eventually, with more people going up the mountain, it becomes much easier to convince the people on the beach to start their journey. However, even in the event of a tidal wave or deadly storm, there will be people who will not abandon their home on the beach. Even though life is hard on the beach, it comes with its rewards as well. I mean, it’s still a beach after all.

When you think of this analogy, who are the people on the beach?

What is paradise like?

Who are the people in paradise and what do you think about them?

Who are the docents?

Where are you?

How far up the mountain did you get?

Where do you want to be? Why?

What else can you add to this analogy?

Thanks for playing along. I do hope you share your answers with me.

If you are a docent, we want you in the C3 LinkedIn community. We are building a foundation for a coordinated effort to make the path easier for more people to make it further up the mountain.

Phil Collins – Another Day In Paradise (Official Music Video)

Genesis ‘The Last Domino?’ Tour 2021 tickets on sale now via http://www.genesis-music.com “Another Day In Paradise” was the first single to be released from …

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

2020: The Year of Perfect Hindsight?

If 2020 is the year of perfect hindsight, what has it revealed?

Reflection is an essential part of making conscious decisions and developing as a leader.

The lockdowns during Spring 2020 forced us to reflect, so long as we were able to process the shock and grief.

Prior to COVID, I had grown more and more concerned about the limited bandwidth and increasing responsibility of leaders and how that inhibits leaders’ ability to allocate adequate time for reflection. In 2018, 268 million vacation days went unused in the US! Research cited and promoted by Shawn Achor demonstrates the critical nature of taking vacations for professional growth, as well as the data that proves that companies will enjoy higher productivity and engagement when they encourage employees to use their vacation time.

One of the silver linings of lockdown was finally having this reflection time. For some, it offered grace.

It seems, however, there are some things happening right now are increasingly concerning. Number one is that everything is ramping back up, and companies are forced to play catch-up in order to achieve their annual budgets and maintain their workforce. In comparison to when things were slow, and in addition to the extra responsibilities that many workers are shouldering in terms of childcare limitations and virtual learning, leaders and workers alike are experiencing increasing overwhelming burnout.

For the companies without conscious leadership who failed to address and recognize how the pandemic and civil unrest has been impacting their employees, burnout is most certainly inevitable, if it hasn’t already happened.  Women, in particular, have been leaving the workforce at numbers that signal not only a setback for gender equality, but a sign that we have not come as far as we hoped. This will certainly widen the gender pay gap and leave more women in a position to be dependent on their spouses.

Speaking of civil unrest, 2020 has been an awakening for the country on the prevalence and impacts of systemic racism from our police to our boardrooms.

While the field of human resources has been growing in vigilance against biases, political biases have not only divided Americans further by party, but has also divided families, neighbors, and friends!

The pandemic has made more obvious the disparities between classes and how financially fragile and vulnerable so many Americans are, especially minorities and small business owners.

We have the chance to use the hindsight gained from 2020 and make 2021 the year we bridge our future as a country, as companies, as a community, and as a family. Let’s consider January 2021 as a rebirthday.

Be the bridge!

  • Make sure your company’s leaders are getting adequate time for reflection and employees are taking ample vacation.
  • Evaluate and correct the gender disparities and childcare shortcomings that are impacting families today. Keep in mind that the kids of today become the leaders and solution providers of tomorrow. They need their parents’ time and attention!
  • If you are white, educate yourself about white privilege and fragility. Learn about redlining. Acknowledge and address the real barriers to racial equality in the workforce.
  • Refute your political biases. We cannot unify while we vilify.
  • Support your local businesses as much as you can. Give to your local food banks as much as you can. Check-in on your friends who have been laid off and be proactive in helping them find opportunities!

What other bridges can you build using perfect 2020 hindsight to make sure that we don’t go back to “normal”, but rather move forward toward EPIC.

Epic Careering makes work better for more people. We can support you as a leader to become more influential in building these bridges through the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint.

Branding is the bridge that connects your past and present to your professional future. Is 2021 the year you turn a successful career into a fulfilling legacy? Contact Epic Careering now for a consultation!

Simon & Garfunkel – Bridge Over Troubled Water (Audio)

“Bridge Over Troubled Water” by Simon & Garfunkel Listen to Simon & Garfunkel: https://SimonAndGarfunkel.lnk.to/listenYD Subscribe to the official Simon & Ga…

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

How to Go from a Boss to a Conscious Leader

Recently, I read a post from a business owner who was asking human resources professionals for advice about an employee who requested not to be contacted after work hours or on weekends, except in the event of an emergency. 

He explained that he “made it clear” to the employee that she is not required to respond to anything not urgent after hours or on weekends, but affirmed his “authority to send emails to their work email address for items that may cross his mind after hours so he doesn’t forget. He sent this employee an email over the weekend. She “politely and respectfully” reminded him of her request. “I really would like my time and space respected during off-hours.” He pushed back. She pushed back. 

“You may not like me setting boundaries but this is important to me. If you respected me and my time, you would understand that an employee should be allowed to have a reprieve.”

His perspective was: “As the boss and owner of the company, I should be the one who sets operations and not the employee… She is setting (or changing) the business guidelines and protocol, and it does not sit well with me.”

Many people advised this leader to let her walk, his way or the highway, and he was very much in agreement at the time I read and responded to his post. This advice and his source of discomfort were very much coming from ego rather than empathy. 

Here was my response: 

“Look, everyone is doing the best they can to cope in difficult times. This requires MORE self-care than ever. The only solution isn’t to send emails anyway because it works for you and she can just opt to ignore them. She obviously has notifications on to deal with emergencies, so she will get every email, and even though she may not be required to respond to non-emergencies, she still may feel compelled by a sense of duty and obligation that adds pressure (self-imposed, yes) when she needs to be disconnected. Need – as in, a physical need to manage stress for overall well being. By insisting on your way and not respecting her boundaries, you are communicating that what she needs is less important than what you want. Self-care = putting your needs over someone else’s wants. Selfish = putting your wants over someone else’s needs. What kind of leader do you want to be? Can’t you create the drafts when you think of them and send them off Monday morning? Yes. You can. If you don’t value her, let her go. If you do value her, respect her boundaries. Be the leader she needs.”

He responded, “Fair and well put.”

While he was in ego at the time of posting, he was also open to really hearing other ways to look at this problem. 

I’m not sure how he’ll handle it, but I am glad that he was open.

He said, “I want to do what is fair and just, which is why I came to this group! Thank you!!”

At that moment, this boss/manager had a choice to move into conscious leadership. He was able to do so because his intention was to be fair to his employee. He was open to guidance and new self-awareness, and if he does decide to accommodate his employee, he will have moved from ego to empathy and compassion, which is empathy in action.

As a leader, you have multiple points throughout their days, weeks, months, and years that give you the opportunity to make similar choices. 

Like forming any habit, and what I love about habits, is that once a habit is formed, doing that thing becomes a compulsion rather than a choice. You are pulled to do it, rather than having to push. However, that time in between the self-awareness of the habit that needs to develop and the time that the habit is developed, the push is a challenge for most people. 

Join me for a free online masterclass on Wednesday, September 30th at 2:00 PM EDT to find out more about how you can create more speed and ease during that in-between period so that you can become more consistently conscious as a leader.  

What would you have advised this leader to do? What would you do?

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If you’re dedicated to making a meaningful impact in the world through your work, I invite you to join my LinkedIn group for conscious leaders. Join C3 now to be a part of future free events, watch replay recordings of our past events, interact with the conscious community, speakers, and experts, and have your chance to share your expertise by becoming a future guest panelist for upcoming events. Remember that without you, meaningful change is not possible.

Dashboard Confessional – Bend And Not Break (Lyrics)

Lovely band, lovely song, lovely album Album: “A Mark, A Mission, A Brand, A Scar” – 2003 Lyrics: I catalog these steps now Decisive and intentioned precise …

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

What Do We Really Need More of?

Love by Mayberry Health and Home on Flickr

Sing it with me…”What the world…needs now…is…”

Before you go labeling me as a “snowflake,” or “airy-fairy” or an idealist, all of which I have been accused of and may or may not be true, let me ask you this…. What do you prefer? Love or Rules?

In all the corporate disciplines that exist to help companies become better at cultivating a culture that keeps valuable talent and optimizes engagement (Organizational Development, Human Resources, Training and Development, Talent Management, Change Management, Human Capital Management, etc.,) it seems the best a company can do as of right now is to engage an emotional intelligence trainer, train their managers to be better coaches (I will distinguish between these things below), and re-employ someone who turns out to be suited for their intended role or should their role be eliminated.

Even in these best practices, there are shortcomings, and most companies are just trying to cover their butts with more extensive sexual harassment awareness training and instituting more clear expectations of respectful behavior as well as clear and fair consequences for infractions. Is this adequate? Are these companies treating the symptoms instead of the causes?

Not all managers are coaches. Most managers focus mainly on the pragmatic components of performance. Some, for liability reasons or simply because they don’t feel work is the time or place or because they don’t feel adept at addressing it, ignore the emotional side of their human resources. At what cost?

On the morning I was interviewed by KQTH radio in Tucson last week, I awoke and read a page of Living the Wisdom of the Tao by Wayne Dyer. Reading an inspiring passage to start my day was a ritual that I adopted with the Miracle Morning in 2016. I was going to be interviewed on recruiter blacklists by Mike Rapp, and this particular passage was of serendipitous significance.

Think about the problems that would disappear if people were actually kind, instead of being forced to be kind:

  • The negatives of black lists
  • Harassment (sexual or otherwise)
  • Bullying
  • Bias/discrimination

A long time ago I stopped teaching my clients how to act confident and focused more on helping them be confident. If I find that my clients are hurting or resentful about their employment past, I know that they will get much further much faster if they acknowledge that pain, process it, and release it rather than if they ignore it or pretend it isn’t there.

What would happen if instead of creating rules and guidelines to attempt to avoid offensive behaviors, we address why people treat other people poorly in the first place?

“Hurt people hurt people.” (This quote has been attributed to Will Bowen, Yehuda Berg, and Rick Warren)

Regardless of who said it, can you see how this is true?

I’m not suggesting traditional therapy is the answer. I spent years in therapy myself during my youth through my parent’s divorce, and while I did gain some validation for why I acted out as I did, and it was nice to have someone to talk to during that time, I only felt more emboldened and justified in acting out toward my parents. I felt justified in my resentment. I didn’t heal. The healing began when I started to take more accountability, learned how to forgive, and how to be compassionate. This was coaching, not therapy.

It’s not like flicking a switch. I’m not cured of my pain, and I still may tend to react in my old ways rather than respond in a conscious way, but my awareness improves with continued coaching and I continue to add tools to my toolbox to come from a place of love and compassion rather than pain, and the outcomes of my interactions with people are infinitely better when I do.

Coaching is a way of providing an objective perspective on what can hold back peak performance, and what can be done to attain and maintain peak performance. Coaches do not shy away from the nitty gritty of feelings. They create a safe space for a person to be flawed, give feedback without judgment, and provide techniques, drills, exercises. They provide support and accountability in creating new habits.

Some might say that the workplace is no place for:

  • Love
  • Crying
  • Feelings
  • Personal problems
  • Games

Except, science is proving that positive psychology techniques in the workplace are already:

  • Transforming how a company collaborates
  • Feeding innovation
  • Improving workforce health
  • Improving productivity
  • Increasing profits

Shawn Achor proved in his work with Fortune 500 executives in 42 countries that the byproducts of a more positive workforce are well worth the investments and the investments don’t even have to be monetary or require a lot of time.

I am keenly aware that people in pain don’t usually just make a simple choice to be more positive. Personal transformation is much more complex. There are patterns of thinking reinforced over a lifetime that need to be identified and reversed. Yes, you can apply some simple happiness techniques to become more positive, and that WILL trickle down to various elements of your professional and personal life, and maybe that would be adequate to cultivate respect and tolerance.

But what could work look like if there was a focus on healing and helping employees reach potential in areas of their lives besides work?

One thing I can say with confidence – As hard as you can try to compartmentalize an area of your life, it will surely bleed into the others. This goes for both good and bad things. If you form a good habit in your health, it will have a cascading effect on other areas of your life. If you are having problems at home, or are dealing with health issues, you will find your productivity and engagement go down. Even those who escape their personal problems and dive into their work will find that there is a burn out point, or they are just a little less than their best selves when they are at work. There is even greater pressure to make that part of their lives go well.

Your emotions impact your brain chemistry and your brain chemistry impacts your physical body, communication, and cognition (obviously).

What I am suggesting is that companies consider a truly holistic, even “alternative” approach to the very current initiatives of ridding the workplace from bias, harassment of all kinds, bullying, discrimination, toxicity and stifled growth.

Yes, employees will always benefit from being able to relate better with one another, but they also need to relate better to themselves.

We are less able to give when we feel we don’t have enough. If we don’t feel like we have enough of our basic human emotional needs: connectedness, acceptance, love, we won’t be apt or able to offer it. What companies are asking their employees to do is to put other people’s feelings first. I foresee there being much resistance and inadequate execution with this method.

 

In 2018 Epic Careering is launching a program that will help companies create a conscious culture. It will come with assessments, live workshops, online courses, interactive communities, and management and executive consciousness coaching training. If you recognize that your company is experiencing conflicts and breakdowns that require an alternative solution to the traditional corporate approach, e-mail Karen at Karen@epiccareering.com. Confidentiality is guaranteed. Take the first step in transforming your company for everyone’s sake. There could be a day when you feel as good about going to work as you do about coming home.

What The World Needs Now Is Love / Dionne Warwick

Please skip CM. I am sorry to mistake some spellings. Dionne Warwick ディオンヌ・ワーウィック Burt Bacharach バート・バカラック

5 of the Biggest Lessons I Learned in 10 Years as a Career Coach

Climbing Journal Mount Rinjani Package by Trekking Rinjani of Flickr

Climbing Journal Mount Rinjani Package by Trekking Rinjani of Flickr

 

 

Last week an executive recruiter shared with me a really interesting position that she is trying to fill in the bleeding edge of biotechnology. We reveled at all of the amazing things that we were able to learn by spending quality time with subject matter experts and thought leaders. Then she asked me, “What is the biggest thing you learned when you switched from recruiting to career coaching?” Compassion is the first answer that came to the top of my mind because it was the first big lesson that made the biggest difference in my coaching practice and for my clients.

As I continue to reflect on the past ten years, there are a few more huge lessons among all of the small ones that have made the biggest difference in what and how I teach that have become staples of my brand. Allow me to share the top five lessons from my last ten years:

 

1. You get better results with compassion rather than with judgment

We followed this motto in recruiting, “screen out, not in.” It was meant to keep us looking for the right fit and not to force the fit. I’m a very trainable person and now I know that I can take things too literally. So I adopted this method of qualifying talent, but I did not enjoy the method. Yet, it became my way to be judgmental of candidates. I was always assessing if they were good enough and was always digging for skeletons in their closet. It is part of what made me realize I did not want to be a recruiter any longer. Although I switched sides to become an advisor and advocate for job seekers, I had taken a very “tough love” approach. I shared with them (for their own sake) all of the different and negative perceptions that they could be generating.

This is vital information for job seekers to understand, but what I did not understand at the time was how my role was really to be encouraging, to help them realize and articulate the tremendous value that they can present, and to help them see that they have so much more value to present than risk. For example, even when I was convincing a client that he should have been making double what he had been earning, I had been telling him from a place of judgment and intolerance rather than from a place of understanding and compassion. This is something that I needed coaching on, and I spent a year and then some working to restore and expand my compassion.

 

2Not only should I always be coached, but I should engage a coach who is an expert in each thing I want to master

Coaching had a profound impact on me, and that is why I found it a worthwhile career pursuit. I don’t know what made me think that once I became a coach I no longer needed coaching. In fact, what I discovered over the last ten years is that my capacity to learn new techniques, methodologies, and skills not only expands my abilities to accomplish goals my personal life, but it exponentially evolves the value that I offer my clients. This enables me to help them go further faster than ever before. It does not really matter what material I’m learning, there are always new applications for my clients.

 

3. Success is about 20% what you do, 30% how you do it, and 50% what you do it from

In college, I took a lot of communications courses for my major and I learned a lot about nonverbal communication and how much more influential it can be on people versus verbal communication. I certainly saw that in practice as a recruiter, as I became a human lie detector, but it was not until I underwent transformational training around communications that I had an epiphany: No matter what we say, or how we tactically manipulate our pitch, facial expressions, or body language, if we are coming from negative emotions, we will most likely have a negative communication outcome.

Do you have one of those friends that presses you a lot with, “no offense but…” and you know that what is likely going to come out of their mouth is going to be offensive? Did you know that we cannot possess negative emotion and positive emotion simultaneously, though we can easily switch back and forth? Physical and physiological changes in our pitch, tone, facial expressions, and body language occur naturally as results of our emotions. It makes a lot more sense to just be more conscious of which emotions we are communicating through, rather than to pay attention and manipulate the physical and physiological symptoms. Everyone has an internal lie detector, and although they do not recognize what they are picking up as a lie, they will get a general sense of being out of rapport with someone. If you are not in rapport with someone, you cannot be influential. Conclusion: if you want to be influential, communicate from a positive emotion, such as joy, possibility, love, and compassion.

 

4. When done right, technology makes us more productive, more efficient, and more effective, but it has to be done with discipline

I totally understand people who are resistant to using social media because there is a real risk that you will miss out on what and who is physically in front of you, and it can become an unhealthy escape from reality. However, there are ways to manage social media and technology usage that enable you to reap the benefits, such as being the person that people think of when a great opportunity comes around. That is, someone who can successfully manage and mitigate the potential risks that contribute to a loss of quality of life can use technological tools to be more productive with less effort. The learning, however, and the implementation, as well as tweaking the balance between using and abusing, will take time and effort (although a lot less time and effort if you do #2.)

 

5. Good habits are key to sustainable success, but accountability is only important to most, not all people

I am in love with learning, testing, and applying new techniques and technology that help us create better habits that support us in achieving our goals. Since first studying behavior modification through gamification in 2010, and trying to discover a panacea that would help everyone be successful, I discovered (I’m quoting Gretchen Rubin), “we are all more similar than we think, but our differences are important.” We all have the same brain composition, which operates according to some well-known and some newly discovered ways. Some of those ways help us learn and some impede our learning. However, we all come to the table with our own set of perceptions and beliefs about how the world and people operate.

That perception can greatly shape our tendencies when it comes to not just forming new habits, but the desire to do so. Some people do not need accountability because they hold themselves accountable and are very coachable. However, there are very few of these people. Others prefer to defy expectations and accountability, which makes them less likely to form a habit. Fortunately, this is also a small population of people and they deserve success as much as anyone else. Other coaches might find this population of people to be uncoachable, but I believe they are coachable. Furthermore, I’m enjoying the challenge of figuring out how to be a successful coach to the “rebel” population.

 

My six-year-old always wants to know how I know something. “How do you know the library is going to be closed tomorrow?” Sometimes I find myself explaining to her, “Well, the sign in the elevator said that the library would be closed on Sundays from May until September.” Other times I’ll just say, “Well, you think you know a lot at six years old. Imagine how much more you’ll have learned by the time you’re 12, then 24, and then 48.”

I’m sure if you thought about the last ten years of your career life, you would be equally in awe of how much you have evolved. You would be equally excited about what the next ten years holds in store, just from a learning and development perspective.

 

Please share with me some of the biggest lessons you have learned in the past ten years.