Archives for change your world

Achieving Resilience and Beyond (With Antifragility) – Answer The Call To Conscious Leadership

Resilience isn’t just a leadership skill; it’s a survival skill. Despite what I first thought when I heard the phrase, anti-fragility is not being impervious to negative emotions, but rather using adversity as an opportunity to become even better and to make conditions, products, processes, systems, and conditions even better.

Stanley H. Greene, Global Human and Economic Development Leader, was highly recommended in 2020 as a valuable resource on resilience by Dr. Laura Dowling, who you might remember was our expert panelist on toxic positivity a few months ago.

Since then, I have attended Stanley’s Wednesday PowerThinking calls and highly recommend them, so I was thrilled to welcome him as the panelist for our discussion on achieving resilience and beyond (with antifragility). Go to our LinkedIn community for conscious leaders, C3, to watch the full replay of our event so you can learn more about the significant scientific findings Stanley shared on resilience and its applications to conscious leadership.

We discussed:

  • What it looks like to be a leader with resilience.
  • What are the risks when resilience is lacking?
  • What is at the core of how people get through hard times?
  • How can one escape the condition of learned helplessness and build resilience?
  • The 7 common-sense inner strengths that resilient people have (and that we all have to a certain degree) that can help us prevent learned helplessness and bounce back from adversity faster.
  • How you can take that first next step toward resilience, especially if resilience seems unattainable in the moment.
  • How building resilience works (in your brain).
  • How a leader keeps toxic positivity in check while continuing to develop the resilience of the team.

Watch the replay by joining C3 today. Inside of C3, you can comment and ask Stan any questions you have since he’s also a member. Join him for weekly PowerThinking calls. Keep in mind that the more resilient you become today, the better you can lead your teams through the challenges of tomorrow.

I know it’s been many weeks since I have shared pure value-add content, or so it may seem. ConCon is fast approaching, and the bulk of my time has been making sure that the speakers, the content, and the experience altogether, are transformative.

I hope you’ll understand that by promoting ConCon, I am promoting value. Register today. Every day, we are making updates to the agenda to give you the best speaker, session, panel, and keynote information.

I have a backlog of great topics and I will get back to these articles soon. For now, the single most important thing I feel I can do to advance corporate consciousness is to continue to level up the value of ConCon, and to get people there who will take the content and the contacts they make there, and use it out in the world. So, if you are available on November 5th and/or 6th, or if you can allocate time within the 8 weeks after it to watch the replays, then register now.  If you can’t, then please share it with leaders and aspiring leaders you know who are committed to continual growth and development.

Thanks in advance for all you do to raise corporate consciousness for a better world today and a better future for generations to come.

 

Kelly Clarkson – Stronger (What Doesn’t Kill You) [Official Video]

Kelly Clarkson’s official music video for ‘Stronger (What Doesn’t Kill You)’. Click to listen to Kelly Clarkson on Spotify: http://smarturl.it/KClarkSpot?IQi…

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Smart Civics, Higher Citizenship – Answer The Call To Conscious Leadership

Observations across diverse populations indicate that while we need to be getting better at having hard conversations about change, we are, unfortunately, getting worse. As a result, change initiatives are stalling and issues are festering, causing turnover and instability that threatens productivity and profits. Even worse, those who feel unheard can end up resorting to more extreme measures.

That is why our discussion during last week’s event on Smart Civics, Higher Citizenship was so important. The two panelists who joined us have both developed programs that move communities and organizations past the barriers that have been stifling progress, innovation, and social and racial justice, among other societal threats.

Doc Cunningham is Founder of See America In Color, Social Commentator, and Civic Advisor. He facilitates civic discussions in communities and brings new vibrancy and dimension to inequities so that the gaps become more obvious, encouraging more people to become a part of the solution.

Michael Taylor is Principal and Co-Founder of SchellingPoint, who brings research and a tech-driven approach to aligning people with a common purpose to take action and move in the desired direction.

Join the C3 community now to access the replay!

Here is just some of what we covered:

  • What are the gaps in conventional change management that produce lackluster progress?
  • What is the central frame of change that has led to a more sustainable impact?
  • In order to create coordination action, what do we first have to determine to inform that action?
  • What must you do before you associate a root cause of issues originating with an executive leader?
  • How do you get a group of thought leaders and experts to yield their ego, agree on a plan, and follow through?
  • How do fundamental disconnects on core beliefs sabotage collaborative change efforts and what can be done about it?
  • What are the three triggers of executive action?
  • How can you shift division about whether change is necessary or not? Furthermore, how can you engage or re-engage leadership in decisions around that change that lead to some degree of change?
  • How and why do we want to turn pain into possibility?
  • What are the breakthroughs in behavioral science that have helped to develop the alignment cycle?
  • What are the 5 things a group needs to commit to or reject before they are aligned in action?
  • How can we reconcile the diverse ways analysis can be interpreted?
  • How can you alleviate some resistance to change?

Chances are if you are reading this, there is some change you would like to see. If you are accountable and the progress, or probable progress, discourages you, I highly recommend reaching out to SchellingPoint. Also, contact Doc about his civics programs that “help society lessen the impact of partisan hang-ups and social flare-ups.”

Remember to tune in to our second Answer The Call to Conscious Leadership event this month on Unconscious Bias hosted by TaJuanna Taylor and Carl Shawn Watkins. As always, details on how to attend the live discussion will be shared with you inside of C3.

Last but not least, registration to ConCon 2021 is open. ConCon 2021 will take place virtually on November 5th and 6th. Get your early bird discount today before it expires!

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

The mirror of my ugliness

We-are-entitled-to-our

It was a pretty ugly morning yesterday. The event that occurred later that morning was equally as ugly.

 

Ron Nash’s recent LinkedIn post got me thinking about how I get sometimes when people drive carelessly around me on the road, especially when my kids are in the car. I think to myself, “How selfish is that.” Yesterday somebody felt the same way about me and took it to an extreme.  It stood to completely unnerve me and keep me in a state of upset for days. But that would’ve been my choice.

After dropping my oldest daughter off at school yesterday, I stopped at a stop sign, looked to merge with speeding traffic, and did so “successfully.” This particular stop sign is positioned kind of like an on-ramp, and the locals treat it as such. The cars that were coming were going faster than I could accurately gauge – much faster than the speed limit there. To be considerate to cars that are coming from that direction, I usually accelerate pretty quickly and get up to speed with them so that they don’t even have to tap their brakes. In this case, the car behind me, a big, mean-looking, black SUV with one daylight out, sped up and was very close to my bumper by the time the light just ahead turned yellow. I “ran” the yellow light to make a right turn into my neighborhood. The people behind me were stopped at the red light. In my estimation, they probably would’ve missed it if they were going the speed limit. I suppose that it is fair to say, then, that I prevented them from making the light.

 

As I passed my street, my two-year-old insisted we not go home and continue drive around. Thank God she did, because I was unaware that a car several cars behind that big black SUV decided to follow us to tell me what he thought of my maneuver. This irate, irrational individual might have found out where we lived had we actually went straight home. We stopped at a light by a sandwich shop right past our street and I noticed the car behind me seemed to have trouble stopping in time. I inched up at the light to give him a little more room to stop only to notice that he wasn’t having trouble stopping; he was intentionally getting really close to my bumper. When I looked at the driver to try to figure out why he was getting so close to my bumper, I saw that he was giving me the finger and lewdly gesturing to me. He rolled down his window and I, very curious as to why you would be giving me the finger, rolled down my window. He exclaimed, “Learn how to drive! I saw you back there.”

 

So I asked, “You mean that yellow light that I ran?”

 

No. He said, “You cut everybody off back there.” As he started to continue to exaggerate lewd gestures to me with my two-year-old in the backseat, I quickly decided that I was not going to have a rational conversation with this gentleman to explain that I had plenty of room to merge in with moving traffic and accelerate at a safe speed as long as everybody else was going the speed limit. I also realized that in his current emotional and psychological state, he may not see the irony in the fact that he sped through my residential neighborhood to catch up with me and ride up on my bumper with my toddler in the back seat to tell me that I was a traffic menace. I rolled the window back up as the light turned green. He stayed behind me riding my bumper and exaggerating disgusting gestures to me with an awful face crinkled with anger the whole way through the next town, which happened to have the closest police station. I traveled the speed limit, if not slower, the whole way. I even refrained from turning on red (where it is permitted) when the cars going straight seemed to be in their own jam.

 

He was still too close to me to see if his turn signal was on and if he was going to continue to follow me. When the light turned green, I turned right to go towards the police station and he continued straight into the next town. I thought about trying to turn around and follow him to get his license plate number, but thought better of it. I was shaking pretty badly and I just wanted to regain my sense of calm. As my daughter, completely unaware of what was transpiring, continued to sing happily in the backseat, I regained my sense of calm. Over the course of a couple of hours I made it a point to reframe the situation and gain a healthful and helpful perspective of it, just as the Ron Nash post echoes.

 

I looked how I could take accountability. This probably seems a little crazy for people who have no understanding of the law of attraction. Because this law states that you attract what you give your attention to, I had to accept that it was because of how ugly I had been behaving with my daughters that morning that the event transpired – my anger, my lack of patience, my obscene, exaggerated tone of voice and facial expressions. I didn’t actually say anything obscene or insulting, but I’m fully cognizant from other personal development and therapy that I’ve done of how kids very easily make things mean, “I’m not good enough,” “I’ll never get it right,” and “I’m such a screw-up,” “I’m a bad kid.” That guy was a mirror. I hardly believe myself when I say I’ll never be that ugly again. But, I more vividly understand how I was being, how I want to be, and why I should choose more wisely. I have increased access to the tools I’ve been taught to control my anger and extend more patience to my kids so that they can forgive themselves for their mistakes and grow from them, rather than being hindered and stifled by them.

 

That guy may have been suffering from a psychotic breakdown. In my effort to use this experience as a moment of enlightenment, I started to come from a place of compassion. I thought to myself, “He must really hate himself to be expressing that amount of hate on the outside to complete strangers.” I thought about all the ways that this guy is probably damaging relationships with other people and impeding his own personal growth by placing the accountability on others. He must really be hating where he is in his life right now.  I actually started to cry for him and pray for him.

 

The protective mother in me really hopes that my house is not a regular landmark on his commute into work every day. I hope I never have a run-in with him again for the sake of the safety of my children and myself, and I hope that I don’t read about a road rage incident involving the same guy that escalates to even higher level. I pray, more than anything, that he has a moment of clarity and perspective on decisions that he can make to be happy and feel connected. I am grateful to him for giving me that moment. As long as I choose to be who I want to be more than I choose to react in ways I find ugly, I am confident I will have few more ugly encounters like that.

 

Also, I will be more careful and considerate merging into speeding traffic. Who knows whose day I’m messing up by making them miss a light, especially when I am in no particular rush.