Archives for amazing leaders

Toxic Positivity: Do We Have To Feel Bad for Feeling Bad?

Do we have to feel bad for feeling bad?

NO! Feelings are hard enough.

I’ll also add that hurt people hurt people and sometimes when we’re feeling bad, we misdirect our feelings into words and actions we can’t take back. Then we feel bad for feeling bad AND making someone else feel bad. Fortunately, this is a habit we can break. We can learn to better process and express these emotions so that we don’t compound our pain.

Toxic positivity is what happens when people don’t feel safe expressing negative emotions.

The main focus of most companies is on their bottom line. So it would behoove these companies to better understand how they bleed money when they enable a toxic work environment, including discouraging expression of emotion in the workplace, both positive and negative emotions.

Denying a human being the ability to let emotions show and be healthfully processed can backfire in big ways. The worst of those ways is disgruntled employee violence. It creates a powder keg situation. Suppressing negative emotions is dangerous for the individual’s health and for the people around them.

In our next monthly Answer the Call to Conscious Leadership event, Dr. Laura Dowling will share some of the latest research on the impact of toxic positivity. She will also provide leaders with guidance about how to create an environment where negative emotions can be expressed healthfully so that they don’t turn into costly turnover, absenteeism, presenteeism, and morale killers. She’ll also share some ways that individuals can learn to healthfully process and express negative emotions so that we don’t injure others with our emotions.

Request to join the C3 Community today so you can join us for this live event tomorrow (Thursday) at 1:00 PM ET. If you can’t make it live, fret not! The replay will also be available for you to watch at your convenience inside of the C3 Community.

REO Speedwagon – Can’t Fight This Feeling (Official HD Video)

Watch the official music video for “Can’t Fight This Feeling” by REO SpeedwagonListen to REO Speedwagon: https://REOSpeedwagon.lnk.to/listenYDSubscribe to th…

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Redefining Leadership

What did you think leadership was when you were growing up?

One of the scariest phases in a parent’s life is when they no longer are the primary influence on their kids. They choose a new “leader” to follow. But are they good ones?

What were you examples were you taught from childhood to emulate, and how did that transform as you asserted your independence? Did you follow the wrong people sometimes? How did that teach you to make better choices and about whom you wanted to be?

I find that few people I meet, work with, and get to know had really strong examples of leadership in their homes and beyond. I’m sure this varies from community to community and from demographic to demographic. I envy, yet fail to relate, to people who grew up in households where they had consistent financial and emotional support. In many ways, it is because I experienced gaps in these areas that I developed certain strengths, yet, I had a very warped idea of what true leadership actually is.

I am grateful to have started therapy young, as a fourth-grader, even though it came with stigma in an already un-empathetic community. It made me realize just how much outside help I needed, and set me on a path of self-discovery and self-help that eventually led to engaging coaches, attending conferences, and taking courses through Landmark Education. These led to breakthroughs in my life, and inspired the desire to help others have breakthroughs in their career that make their lives better.

Growing up, leadership seemed to me to be about power, getting others to follow, and manipulating people to get your way. I was wooed by charisma and confidence instead of character. I made a lot of mistakes in leadership as a result.

The further down the path of personal development I went, the more I realized that I needed to redefine leadership. In one particular course, the Self-Expression Leadership Course, I demonstrated to myself that the leader I wanted to be – the highest version of leader I could achieve – is someone who creates other leaders by inspiring and enabling them to be the best version of themselves.

Of course, idealism and reality do not always coincide, and learning is a bumpy road. So did I still make mistakes? Yes, yet I also increased over time the amount of time I am that highest version of leadership, and my career continued to give me new opportunities to learn, especially from my amazing clients, and to test myself – with professional networking organizations, with parent-teacher organizations, in my community, as a college professor and youth instructor, and with my kids.

Sidebar: the kids are the biggest challenge to date! I seek out more help in this area than any other and continue not getting the results I want, not knowing if I’m doing “right,” and feeling like I am completely out of my element. Anyone else?

I spent the past four years focused on taking everything I have learned and developing the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint, and though I engaged various coaches and mentors to help me, it still felt like a solo effort and an uphill climb to garner enough enrollment to make a difference, and yet the urgency of making a difference continued to grow as my kids got closer to their teenage years (they’re still tweens) and to impending adulthood.

Then, of course, as 2020 unleashed its fury.

I got the sense that I was not alone, in fact. Other people were also feeling their sense of urgency to make an impact grow, and it was high time we started collaborating and co-creating if we really wanted to get anywhere.

I put some LinkedIn feelers out, and one of the first leaders to respond became my co-creating partner. I’m talking about Lawrence Henderson, my co-manager for the C3 community.

Together we grew our C3 community to 140 co-creators and had 25 of them step up to the online “stage” to share their wisdom and success for the benefit of our community, most of whom joined us last month for our Year-In-Review event.

When creating our vision for the coming year, Lawrence and I knew that we had to keep our mission about leveling up leaders and giving them more and more opportunities to co-create and share the goods with others, so we put the invitation out to our panelists to speak at ConCon 2021 (click here to join the waitlist) and to host their own Answer the Call to Conscious Leadership events. We are so thankful that Phil Williams and TaJuanna Taylor have answered our call to action and now the number of monthly events we have is doubled. This is great news, as we have so many in-demand topics to cover in 2021 and beyond.

Sadly, due to circumstances, Phil cannot jump in just yet, so we are looking for another conscious leader to step into hosting with TaJuanna on Unconscious Bias in August.

If you would love to co-create a new stage to elevate conscious leaders and conscious leadership any time this year, get in the C3 Community and introduce yourself today! Let us know what you would like to co-create and with what conscious leadership practices you have had success.

The stage is yours!

Garrison Starr – Superhero

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Cancel Culture vs Conscious Capitalism

A few weeks ago, I shared a story about a School Board Chair who stepped down from his leadership role in the wake of backlash against his graduation speech.

Some comments reflected a wariness around people being ousted for saying something perceived as offensive, shifting the wrongdoing to the people so easily offended bullying people into resigning positions of power. His wife took to social media to make sure that the record accurately reflected that no one bullied him.

What we know is that there are too few leaders who would so responsively take accountability for harm done. Why? Ego. No one is immune from ego, however, conscious leaders are committed to being self-aware and recognizing when ego is interfering with the highest good. What is in the highest good can often conflict with personal, corporate, or government agendas, which is what makes it so hard to consistently be a conscious leader. As I said in my past article, even conscious leaders make mistakes.

So, when leaders (or individuals) do harm, and fail to hold themselves accountable, it is up to others to hold them accountable. In a company, one might think it is the job of even higher-up leaders to hold others accountable. In reality, performance and success are measured in dollars, which makes profit the priority over people and the planet. In many corporate cultures, people and the planet don’t even show up on the list of priorities, and harm to both is a byproduct. There is no authority delegated to ensure that decisions made by the most wealthy and powerful aren’t adversely impacting people and the planet.

Conscious capitalism arose as a movement because of the influence money has on these leaders and their decisions as a priority of their performance.

There are other ways to influence these leaders to better consider harm to people and the planet in their decisions, such as:

  • Petitions/Protests
  • Media/Social Media/Public Relations Awareness Campaigns
  • Litigation/Class Actions
  • Strikes
  • Government/Industry Regulations

Is the fact that more people are leveraging these methods an indication that there is a mass reckoning or is it getting out of hand?

Is the damage to people (and the planet) getting out of hand, or is the response over-sensationalized?

Are too many leaders’ livelihoods damaged, seemingly permanently, by public backlash? Is it deserved?

It depends on whom you ask.

An accusation, whether true or not, can be enough to jeopardize a livelihood.

Personal grievances can become the justification, then, for revenge. Accusations, therefore, should not be made lightly or without evidence. I am troubled by an increasing trend of people not being able to civilly confront one another and work out potential issues with good old effective interpersonal communication.

On the flip side, the danger of a lack of accountability for harm done leads to more harm done. To assume that unchecked leadership will automatically consider potential primary, secondary, and tertiary impacts in all decisions is in direct denial of history, data, and what we currently understand about human behavior. We are at such a critical point in our climate, both planetary and social, that if the oppression of our people and our planet continue, there will be another kind of reckoning. And it could make profit seem like a very foolish priority.

What about when the harm isn’t yet known to anyone, but a decision is recognized as harmful by the leader who made it? How can we incentivize leaders to admit to their mistakes if the admission itself can be damaging or fatal to a lucrative career? Accountability doesn’t have to be fatal, but sometimes it hurts. Can a leader come clean without carnage?

I’ve noticed that while we are quick to vilify, we also love a redemption story. Still, some will continue to vilify, but a public figure can restore livelihood and reputation by being a “bad guy turned good.”  Yes, this can burn bridges, especially if doing so brings other harm-doers down. It’s evident, though, that what isn’t working needs to be replaced with systems that work better.

At the ConCon event coming up in November 2021, I am compiling a panel of change-makers who have influenced corporate leaders to better prioritize people and the planet and plan on facilitating the co-creation of a list of protocols and best practices from the debate of the panel and input from attendees. We will be launching the registration site for ConCon soon. In the meantime, get on the waiting list. We look forward to all that will come from this epic event.

Wounding and Healing of Men

Provided to YouTube by The Orchard EnterprisesWounding and Healing of Men · Francis DunneryHometown 2001℗ 2004 Francis DunneryReleased on: 2004-08-03Auto-gen…

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Conscious Leadership Isn’t Perfect Leadership

Conscious Leadership isn’t perfect leadership. With all the backlash surrounding cancel culture, how to hold leaders accountable is becoming more confusing. Can we hold leaders accountable without “canceling them?”

A deeper look into this is coming; I have been pitching an article to major publications on this very topic. In the meantime, let’s ask a different question:

What if leaders held themselves accountable?

We can’t expect leaders, who are still human, will lead without fault, without mistake, and without unintentional harm, no matter how conscious they are. Consider consciousness in this context to mean self-aware and intentional about acting and deciding in the best interests of people and the planet.

So, when they make a mistake, what would it look like if they held themselves accountable?

I’d like to present Exhibit A.

Joel Fishbein, recently-resigned School Board President of Cheltenham School District.

This mistake: minimizing Frederick Douglass’s slavery and slavery in general in a graduation speech intended to inspire students to take risks and create change.

What he did: Listened and acted with compassion…the next day.

Over half of the district’s student population are Black, and feedback from this community, as well as community organizations, was immediate.

Here’s what he didn’t do: Excuse or defend his error.

Our brain does this thing where it tries to protect our ego. It’s pretty instantaneous and automatic, and we may outwardly react in this mindset – unless, we are self-aware enough to recognize this reflex and conscious enough to stifle it.  Mr. Fishbein’s brain likely did the same thing, and I’m uncertain how he initially reacted to this feedback. However, he clearly didn’t react outwardly in this mindset. Fairly quickly, based on his next-day press response, he put his ego aside and went into his higher-self mind. He made a decision to do what was in the best interest of the community he served.

Here is what else he did:
  • Owned his mistakes and the harm they inflicted. You can tell that he really put himself in their shoes, recognizing that this was supposed to be one of the happiest days of their life – a celebration of all they accomplished. All that was overshadowed by cultural insensitivity, and he validated the voices of those he represents and acknowledging his understanding gap.
  • He voluntarily relinquishing his leadership position as board President to the Vice President (in the interim) while keeping his commitment to the school district, recognizing that in this crucial time in our country and our community’s history, minority populations absolutely need culturally competent leadership.
  • As a school board candidate in my neighborhood, Tiffany Cherry, pointed out, he also “immediately instituted a policy to mitigate the chance of something similar reoccurring (addressing what is now foreseeable).”  The speech was not read by anyone prior to him reading it at the graduation ceremony. From now on, the school board will read and approve public addresses from members of the board.

Of course, there were those who assumed that Mr. Fishbein was coerced into resignation, and decried him a victim of cancel culture. His wife joined his efforts in making sure the public, particularly those commenting on social media, was clear – this was a decision he made independent of any public pressure, because it was the right thing to do.

While I agree that this mistake does indicate that he is not the culturally competent leader that the people, particularly African Americans, in his community need at this pivotal time, he demonstrated that he is capable of growing and learning into a better, more conscious leader, and we absolutely need more leaders to demonstrate this potential, even if they are not quite at the point of cultural competence.

Conscious leaders may still make mistakes, but we can all make efforts right now to identify and fill our understanding gaps, which starts by admitting we have them. C3 is a community where you can safely admit your understanding gaps, and receive help filling them. Everyone in this group is committed to co-creating a more conscious corporate landscape.

As I said last week, when we know better, we do better, which is a modified quote from Maya Angelou. If you’re looking for a place you can seek to know better, join C3 now, just in time for our monthly event on July 1st, which is actually a year in review. Reflect with some of our past panelists on the most amazing, crazy, chaotic, volatile, and treacherous, but also catalyzing year I have ever experienced in my lifetime.

The Human League – Human

Vote for your favourite 80s hit of all time: https://lnk.to/80BestHitsListen to more from The Human League: http://TheHumanLeague.lnk.to/EssentialsStream a p…

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

A Realistic Expectation for a More Conscious Career Path

When the world (or your world) is hit by a major catastrophe, it tends to spur you to re-evaluate your life. It inspires re-prioritization. Often, professionals start reflecting on their careers, questioning if the time that they have been investing in a lucrative career has actually been adding any value on a wider scale, and if it will matter once they are gone.

These are the people who tend to be my clients.

Of course, other things can spur these thoughts, as well. Seeing someone else make a change to a career that is more passion-filled and purpose-filled can make you wonder why you decided at some point that wasn’t an option for you. Was that the truth? Or, was it a story? What purpose did that story serve? How long will it serve you?

If you have had a moment like this and your reason for keeping things status quo was how long it would take you to a better place, what did you really think it would take? Are you really not able to make that happen right now?

What are the costs of staying the course?

Are you going to work each day with a knot in your stomach? Do you notice that your breathing is frequently short? Are your shoulders often tense? Are your thoughts often negative? Do you count the minutes until you can be done and go home? Do you dread Mondays and live for Friday? Do you come home mentally and emotionally exhausted? Do you feel bad about the non-work-related responsibilities that don’t get done, or don’t get done to the quality that you prefer?

Does this happen more often than triumphs, or do they outweigh the triumphs?

Do you really know how much this is costing you? Do you know how your physical health is being impacted? Have you fully evaluated the impacts on your mental and emotional health?

Do you know how your relationships are suffering? More so, do you realize that there is another option?

What is your next move?

Your options are:
  1. Stay the course
  2. Learn how to influence positive change where you are
  3. Do the same thing, but for a mission-driven organization
  4. Inventory your talents and skills, and then reinvent and rebrand yourself for a totally different career
  5. Retire and donate your time to worthy causes
If you go with number one…

Chances are good that change will come whether you will it to or not, and when it comes, it may not be anything close to change that you would want.

If you go with number two…

How quickly you can effectuate change is variable and dependent on many factors, such as your credibility and current ability to influence leaders, the size of the organization, the culture of the industry, the scope of the change, and the stakes for the top players. In our Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint, we teach guide conscious leaders in successfully launching a minor conscious change initiative by week 18. That is to launch, however, not necessarily to completion. It requires participants to invest 45 minutes on a small group coaching call, completing a 15-minute weekly assignment, investing 5-15 minutes reading articles or watching media daily, and listening to an audio recording as you lay down to sleep and after you open your eyes to wake. It’s designed for busy executives and professional parents juggling work and family responsibilities. I know many programs have said this – we mean it!

Are you a good candidate for the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint? Apply and find out.

If you go with number three…

You could have a conversation tomorrow that could lead to your next opportunity. However, intentional career management means being able to assess comprehensively if that opportunity is really the next best step. You want to assess if it’s really in alignment with your core values, if you would feel optimally fulfilled, if it will support your desired lifestyle or if there is perhaps something even better.

The first step is gaining at least 80% clarity on the role, the company, and a plethora of other criteria.

The next step is branding. Don’t skip this step and go right to writing a résumé. A strong résumé may generate a lot of interviews, but a lot of interviews may not be right for you. A branded résumé helps employers self-qualify themselves as a great fit for you and positions you as a top competitor from the get-go. An authentic, powerfully articulated brand will also make all of your efforts easier. Our Epic Branding process takes 3-5 weeks, and some of that time is dependent on your ability to partner with us, provide us with the needed information, and procure feedback from stakeholders in your career.

This might seem like a lot, but if you put in those 3-5 weeks, by the end you will have a résumé, LinkedIn profile, and perhaps other collateral, that will inspire a sense of urgency from conscious employers, and momentum will be that much easier to achieve. Momentum in a job search means greater confidence, plus a greater sense of ease in interviews, better leverage in negotiations, and more freedom of choice in what opportunity you ultimately choose.

Once you have your branded materials, it’s campaign time. By week three using the Epic campaign tools, training, and support, you will start forming better habits, make better choices with your time, and start to enjoy your job search activities and their results. From there, momentum builds very quickly! The wild card is how long the hiring process takes for your chosen position, industry, and company. The time of year can have an impact, as well. The holidays and summer are harder times to get all the stakeholders in a room. These days, companies have to move very fast to snag talent before their competition. The timing between the first interview and start date could be as little as 3 weeks to as long as 2 months for most non-executive positions.

Without branding, expect to elongate the process of vetting opportunities that ultimately are not a fit, which can be determined in early conversations or when they tell you after so many interviews that the offer went to someone else.

Epic Careering has proven branding processes. Schedule a consultation now.

If you go with number four…

Epic Careering has programs to help you map out your career discovery journey, but they are not finite processes. Life doesn’t always offer the conditions conducive to making major life decisions. Crisis can provide clarity, but it can also paralyze our decision-making brain centers. So can trauma, stress, and too many competing priorities. You will have a partner to support you through these times, and also provide you with tools, exercises, and coaching to help you achieve the best mindset and emotional state from which good decisions are made. The goal is to do this within 30 days. It’s realistic in ideal conditions to gain 80% clarity on your new career focus within a month. Then, see the branding and campaign process above for the timeline from this point.

According to Gretchen Rubin, 19% of people will hold themselves accountable to follow best practices, pending they know them, without outside accountability. 17% will rebel against best practices and outside accountability. For the other 64%, knowing the best practices isn’t enough to get you 100% of the way there. Let Epic Careering show you how to manage a successful campaign AND develop career-making habits that will improve your conscious career growth and trajectory from here through retirement. See branding above first, though.

If you go with number five…

Congratulations! While so many professionals spend their whole careers looking forward to retirement, did you know that the change that comes with it can be quite unnerving? Think about how much of your identity has been tied to your profession. Once that’s gone, will you feel like something is missing? A part of you? Will you worry about people moving on and accomplishing or failing without you? Will you know what to do with all that time that will give you that same sense of purpose?

I highly recommend that you reach out to Ford Myers. He can help you custom-design your retirement lifestyle.

If you’re still left with questions about your next move, schedule a complimentary consultation call to discuss your options with us.

Eric Clapton – Change The World

Come On Sing Along!If I could reach the stars I’d pull one down for youShine it on my heart so you could see the truthThat this love I have inside is everyth…

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

5 Habits That Distinguish Leaders From Bosses

Now that my daughters are on sports teams, I am teaching them what it means to be an athlete. They’re not new to sports; between the two of them, they’ve tried just about everything: swimming, soccer, volleyball, field hockey, horseback riding, basketball, gymnastics, and on and on. Officially now, they are on teams with uniforms and games. They have teammates relying on them to perform. It’s a big step up from the casual effort they have been used to making.

I might have considered myself an athlete at some point in my life, particularly my senior year playing varsity softball and the first year I played rugby when I did some intense physical training. I realized when I met my husband that I was athletic, but not an athlete. He took it way more seriously than I ever did, and, go figure, he went all the way to world championships and the Junior Olympics. He didn’t even start until 6th grade, but to catch up with his friends who were further ahead, he put the time and commitment in. That drive became the foundation for strong habits to support his continual improvement, and probably what he can thank for his athletic scholarship and his college degree.

My husband is still on the wall of fame at the high school, so it was assumed my daughters would follow in his footsteps. We didn’t apply pressure to do anything but try and stay active. It took many years of trying many things, but they finally decided to choose something more serious – lacrosse and softball. Before I paid the fees, I made sure they understood the following:

  • If they don’t understand something, it’s their duty to their teammates to ask their coach for help.
  • Once you join the team, practice and games come before social engagements and most family engagements.
  • Besides the two days of practice, they have to practice what they learn in between at least 2 additional days per week (and more if they need it).
  • They have to be able to keep their current obligations to school and other activities, like show choir, band, and orchestra.
  • They have to start owning their health – build up their stamina and balance outside of practice and EAT HEALTHFULLY plenty of fruits and veggies, plus making protein a staple of every meal.
  • They have to start being mindful of their self-talk and experimenting with self-talk that makes them feel stronger and more capable.
  • They are responsible for taking care of, keeping track of, and bringing all equipment they need.

Once they agreed, life felt like it picked up speed by 10x, but after a year of little to do (safely), it’s been great, though tricky, to have a full calendar again. It has taken some adjustment for me to coach them through new habits so that they can keep the above commitments, but we are finally achieving a flow.

Just as discipline is the difference between playing sports and being an athlete, discipline also makes a difference between being a boss and being a leader.

So, I want to ask you:
  • Did anyone have a similar talk with someone before leadership was hoisted upon you?
  • Did someone explain that implied in leadership is the commitment to continually elevate your consciousness?
  • Did they show you how to elevate your consciousness?
  • Did they help onboard you into new habits to support this?

If your answer is yes, you are one of too few, and very fortunate.

Some leaders figure this out on their own, sometimes as a result of having poor leaders and sometimes as a result of having great leaders.

Still, forming habits conventionally is challenging just based on the anatomy and function of our brain. The hard-wiring of our survival brain sometimes inhibits our evolved brain when it comes to practicing conscious leadership as well as forming habits.

One way to overcome this natural barrier is to schedule your future habit as a ritual on your calendar.

There are 5 simple daily habits you can develop in 10-15 minutes each day that will exponentially and consistently expand your consciousness as a leader. They will also have multiple benefits to many other realms of your life.

These simple habits are:
  1. Mindfulness
  2. Upskilling
  3. Heart-centered communications
  4. Reflection
  5. Fitness (mind, body, and soul)

You could delegate a power hour every day to do them all, but that can be overwhelming and overwhelm itself can be inhibitive of starting and sustaining a habit. , even if being successful is really about cutting an hour of a less helpful habit, like scrolling social media.

Instead, I invite you to designate a day for each habit, and feel free to use the weekend how you like. If there is a day you love so much you want to repeat it, do that. You may be already doing one or a few of these. In that case, it’s just a matter of seeing these activities as part of your overall consciousness elevation strategy and you might want to make some tweaks accordingly. For instance, if you already spend some time upskilling each week, choose to upskill in breakthroughs in behavioral science, neuroscience, and performance optimization.

I’d like to suggest the following designations:

Monday Mindfulness

Tuesday Upskilling

Wednesday Heart-centered Communication

Thursday Reflection

Friday Fitness

You can feel free to re-arrange these as you see fit, based on how your energy or your calendar trend.

This schedule is based on my natural rhythms, because when it comes to forming a new habit, I like to give myself every advantage. I won’t schedule a high-energy activity when I’m low energy.

Monday – Mindfulness

Many people mistake mindfulness for meditation. Both have amazing benefits for your consciousness and beyond, but mindfulness is a practice where you take moments as frequently as possible throughout the day to just notice and be. Rather than trying to clear your mind, fill your senses by taking in every detail, from how your clothes feel on your body and how the air smells to the fine weaves of a fabric or the fractal design of a flower. Surely, designating a day for this will lead to you taking more mindful moments all around. Mindfulness helps you learn how to create calm in the midst of chaos and clarity in the midst of confusion. When you have to make high-stakes decisions as a leader, being able to do this is absolutely critical. It will also help you enhance your EQ and empathy so that you can be a more effective communicator.

Tuesday – Upskilling

I also call it “Learnin’ Tuesday,” but I’ve upgraded it to reflect that upskilling is also about applying what you learn, so make time for that, too.

If you were working on a certification, this would certainly apply, and, in that case, you might want to designate more than 15 minutes or integrate it into more than one day. However, just 15 minutes of watching a TED Talk, listening to a podcast, reading your favorite organization’s newsletter, a business journal, or a good old book will ensure that you are continually expanding your ability to consciously lead. It will also keep you on the forefront of impactful breakthroughs.

Because webinars and conferences can happen any day of the week, you may opt to schedule your upskilling day on a day that corresponds to a specific event and rearrange the days to dedicate to the other habits accordingly. Be graceful with yourself as you integrate new habits. Eventually, this will all feel like a pull, not a push, and you’ll naturally respond to schedule conflicts by prioritizing your habit.

Wednesday – Heart-centered Communication

If you are having a bit of a stress response to the idea of doing this, number one – you are not alone. Especially after this period of social distancing during such divisive times, we as a society are a bit out of the habit of digging into emotional content constructively. It would also be fair to say that we as a society have been traumatized and stunted in our communications over the past year. However, to be a conscious leader, creating a psychologically safe space for emotions is required. It might bring you some relief to know that heart-centered communication is mostly asking meaningful questions, listening with empathy, and following through with compassion.

You may use this time to build rapport and demonstrate vulnerability by making a confession about yourself. You could make an earnest inquiry with someone for whom you are concerned. We are focusing on the habit itself, so the people with whom you have this communication do not have to be in your professional realm. It’s expected that the better you get at leaning into emotion-filled conversations, the easier it will be to have them when your team members need them. Some professional applications could also be a weekly structured mentorship call, the institution of peer feedback loops, or attendance at a mastermind, so long as you and the other participants remain authentic and transparent about your emotional status.

Thursday – Reflection

Busy leadership schedules chronically fail to allow for ample time to reflect on communications and decisions. If you are like me, you may be criticizing yourself right now for torturing yourself with self-assessments. That’s actually quite common for high achievers, but it’s not really the healthful reflection I am recommending.

In this reflection, you will be suspending your ego and pouring on unconditional self-love. Does that sound contradictory? It might, because we think of our ego as an inflated version of our self-image, however, that is just what our ego does to make up for how small we feel. If we focus on feeling 100% perfectly imperfect just as are, even with our messy emotions, even after our mistakes, and even when our actions create negative consequences for others, we are quicker to take ownership, learn, and grow. We are not so busy maneuvering others’ perceptions to make us not wrong/right. When we stand in self-love, our ego has no job but to observe. Shame, we have learned from Brené Brown, is a very powerful, painful force that we let diminish our self-worth and convince us that we ought not to aspire to do big things since we do not deserve to succeed in them.

In evaluating the week’s decisions and communications, stand in self-love, knowing that no matter what you didn’t do perfectly, all is okay. Take a moment to put yourself in the shoes of all who were impacted by those decisions or communications.

Ask yourself the following questions:
  • Did you have the intended outcome? (Obviously, you want to evaluate the outcome or progress, first or foremost.)
  • What were the undesirable outcomes, if any?
  • Was there anything about your experience you could have improved? What was your emotional state throughout?
  • Did you take in all of the data?
  • What biases may have manifested that would impact others and be detrimental for stakeholders?
  • What were words or actions that triggered emotions?
  • Were the emotions helpful or harmful to your rapport and/or desired outcomes?

I highly recommend that you journal as you reflect. The cathartic exercise of writing can put you into a more perceptive and receptive state of mind, and you may have insights you wouldn’t otherwise have. Seeing your thoughts on paper enables you to use different parts of your brain for reflection which can make your assessment that much more comprehensive.

Determine if there is any unintended harm that you need to own and apologize for. Then make a plan for next week’s heart-centered communication to do just that. Some things may need to be cleaned up right away, but only do it after you have considered carefully what your higher self will say about it, and refrain from letting your ego take control. And only do so right away if it is in the highest good of the other person, not because you want to feel relief from your guilt as soon as possible.

Making a habit of reflection makes self-awareness more automatic and accelerates the switch from ego to higher self, which also further enhances your effectiveness as a communicator and decision-maker.

Friday – Fitness

Fitness in this context refers to mind, body, and spirit. You may opt to tend to all three daily or split them into three of their own separate days. Just be sure to integrate all three because, without all three integrated, you are not holistically healthy and optimized as a conscious leader.

Mind fitness is enhanced by games and puzzles, meditation, yoga, and a good night’s sleep, which obviously is also important for your physical fitness, just as physical fitness is great for your mind fitness, but not enough to have your physical fitness stand alone as both.

Some mind fitness can also cross over into spiritual fitness and vice versa, such as meditation with a spiritual or transcendental element or chanting. Note that being spiritual does not require religion at all. You may just opt to take time honoring the miracle that you are, that your friends, family, and pets are. You can also take some time to recognize the connectedness of everything. These are just some non-secular spiritual ideas. Not all religious practices are spiritual either. The difference is how they make you feel.

The difference between a boss or a leader is similar to the difference between playing sports and being an athlete, and that difference is discipline. It will be up to you, conscious leader, to establish boundaries that enable you to keep these commitments to yourself. Statistically, only a small portion of the population is really good at self-accountability for self-driven goals. If this isn’t you, engage a coach, an accountability partner, or keep your reasons visible to inspire you every day.

If you seek a coaching program that will help you establish these habits for the rest of your life, introduce you to the most cutting edge conscious leadership breakthroughs, and provide you with a peer support systems that will keep you inspired and motivated, find out if you are a candidate for the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint.

What are your conscious leadership habits? What is your why for having them?

The Who – Won’t Get Fooled Again

This is Track 09 of the Who’s album – Who’s next. First recorded (then rejected) in New York on March 16, 1971, this became the first song to be worked on wi…

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Own Your Words, Own Your World

How many times have you made a judgment call about a person based on a comment they made?

Did that comment really define them and was your judgment accurate? How do you know? Does it matter?

Here’s why it’s been mattering lately.

  • Co-creation – Pharma companies worked together to expedite clinical trials and get out a critically needed vaccine to the world. We have other crises that need solutions.
  • Opportunity – Because of the above, the in-demand skills of today and tomorrow are people-related. Though some are trying, this is a functional area that isn’t expected to be ethically automated with any kind of efficacy.
  • Racial Justice – Silenced and discouraged voices are piping up much louder while they face continued resistance and suppression. We’re not going back to how it was before George Floyd. There’s too much work to do!
  • Division – Politics and personal freedom have literally divided families during one of the loneliest times imaginable for people of this time.
  • We have just had 7 mass shootings in 7 days. Clearly unresolved issues are a public threat.

Some unexpected aspects of accountability in leadership came up yesterday while Lawrence Henderson and I were on Clubhouse (which we are every other Tuesday, so please follow us and join us on the app @BossLLab and @ripplemaker).

The consensus seems to be that the art of civil discourse is lost. The perception of recent conflict seems to be that it has been counter-productive. Lawrence and I are huge fans of Cy Wakeman’s No Drama approach. What’s the difference between drama and conflict?

It’s drama when:

  • You have an issue with someone and, instead of addressing the source, you involve other people.
  • You address the source, but are combative and/or accusatory.
  • You allow your conflict with someone to prohibit your performance and fall short of expectations.
  • The source of the issue is a perception, not a truth, and that perception drives decisions.

However, conflict is necessary for innovation. And, it’s necessary for conscious leadership. We may have learned that confronting someone makes things worse. The thing is, few are trained to effectively address conflicts, so what we see is conflict making things worse, now more than ever.

Social media has enabled keyboard warriors to develop habits and expectations that real-world consequences for words put out into the world don’t exist. Is this what has bled into the workplace, or was it something else?

  • Was it the fear that a confrontation can erupt into violence?
  • Was it the idea that we should leave emotions at the door?
  • Was it the constant threat of litigation?
  • Was it punitive Human Resources practices for causing workplace drama/toxicity?
  • Was it ill-advised codes of conduct and compliance training?

Too many trainings right now use subjective language, like “good values,” “professional conduct,” and “respect and dignity”. Another speaker in the Clubhouse room, Tamiko Drummond says that Human Resources needs to own properly training each and every manager on facilitating conflict From the top, leaders need to encourage going deeper into conflict rather than side-stepping it.

Ms. Drummond advises people to ask for clarification when they hear something about which they are passing judgment. “Unpack that statement for me” is a phrase she recommends. I’ve shared before how my former boss’s catchphrase was “help me understand.” At the women’s event I wrote about last week, one leader shared this list of responses to micro-aggressions.

Lawrence shared a story about one of the first private sector leaders he had who shocked him by asking him how he’d like to be approached when he was having a bad day. Wow! What an amazing question! She went on to teach and demonstrate that conflict is inevitable, and when it’s dealt with appropriately, it can make a working relationship that much stronger.

In our last Clubhouse room two weeks ago, one of the most poignant phrases shared by a speaker in the room was “Silence is dangerous.” Just because you aren’t actively hearing about a problem, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist and won’t sabotage progress. Ignorance is only bliss temporarily. Furthermore, ignorance is becoming increasingly unacceptable to those who have been marginalized. Silence is the antithesis of progress, so don’t expect your comments to go without response anymore.

We talked yesterday about how anonymous 360s can be as destructive to morale and team cohesion as social media posts from keyboard warriors. Anonymous feedback is so widely used to identify performance issues, and has led to such mistrust and discouragement. It breeds a lack of accountability for what is said. When there is a void of accountability, there tends to be a perception spin machine. It wastes a lot of energy and resources.

Next, we talked about how to determine if the feedback is even accurate. Another speaker in the Clubhouse Room, Ray Abram, author of Connect Like a Boss, recommended a tool called the Johari Window. This can help leaders determine if there’s a perception issue or an opportunity for growth and development.

I shared another story about my boss, who had been informed that I was not pulling my weight, and that’s why my team was underperforming. I refuted those claims and he gave me the biggest gift. I had suspected for months that two women in the office who had become suspiciously silent toward me were gossiping about me. One I addressed directly; I thought we were friends. She coldly told me there was no problem. The other was on my team and had accused me of underperforming, which I supposed our other teammates agreed with. Thankfully, I had been working with a mentor and all activities were tracked in a database, so the resolution my bosses proposed was to get everyone in the room and put everyone’s cards on the table. The issue was diagnosed as a “perception problem.” I left the firm not long after to start Epic Careering, with my reputation and relationships intact thanks to that meeting.

When people are accountable, they want to know (and need to know) if there is an issue. There are many different ways people communicate. Some are more effective than others, but thankfully communication is a skill everyone can develop – if they’re willing.

So, for the sake of innovation and progress, what opportunities do you have in front of you to question a perception you have about someone?

Come Talk to Me

Provided to YouTube by YouTube CSV2DDEXCome Talk to Me · Peter GabrielUs (Remastered)℗ 2009 Peter Gabriel LtdReleased on: 1992-09-29Auto-generated by YouTube.

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Have You Ever Cried at Work?

Have you ever cried at work? Whether personal or work-related?

How about on the playing field?

What were you taught to do with that emotion?

Suppress it? Fight it? Hide it? Turn it off?

Did anyone ever tell you to just sit with it? Let it out? Journal about it?

Do those methods work, and even if they work in the short-term, what are the long-term impacts?

How many people, let alone leaders, are taught how to process emotion?

How many people have turned to medication or self-medication not as a last resort, but as a go-to to not deal with emotion?

What has toxic masculinity, rugged individualism, and toxic positivity done to contribute to the prevalence of mental illness in adults and those entering adulthood – the generation with the highest rates of mental illness (even pre-COVID) ever?

Or, has it been the increased stimulation and distraction that has led to the increase? Has it been the increase in expectations from our young people to thrive academically and athletically without allowing and accommodating room for our youth to just be still?

The prevalence of mental illness and high-profile mass shootings and bombings has forced some of these questions to the forefront, but what place do these questions have in the workplace?

I am thankful that I started therapy young – in the 5th grade. It was the first time someone told me it was okay to have feelings – to have MY feelings.  Still, it has taken a lifetime to make peace with the intensity of my emotions.

In order to de-stigmatize mental illness, we also have to de-stigmatize emotions. We have to de-stigmatize therapy and normalize healthy outlets, like yoga, meditation, journaling, walking, boxing, etc.

Eliminate the words “woo woo” and “new age” in the context of these practices. There is enough science at this point to substantiate their efficacy, so using those words just makes you seem ignorant, insensitive, and obsolete.

Additionally, it’s time the workplace was encouraging, even accommodating, of these outlets.

If an employer assumes that employees are taking care of their emotional and mental health needs outside of work hours, it’s a dangerous assumption.

Every manager and leader needs to be trained on how to create a conducive environment to have and process emotions, whether privately or with you. As individuals, we have to know how to take care of these needs on our own, but as a leader, you should be able to uncover these needs and know where to refer employees for the care of these needs.

What about physical wellness? Science has proven a link between mental health and physical health. Read more about the links and the costs of this in our Mindfulness and EI training report.

What do you do as an individual experiencing emotions at work?

Firstly, do not apologize!

Secondly, fight your inclination to hide or suppress these emotions. Call them out by name. “I’m feeling _______________. I need a moment.”

You don’t have to decide anything else in this moment – what to do next, what to say, whether to go home or stay, who you’re inconveniencing, etc.

You can leave the room, or stay there. I find it easier to be with my emotions when I’m alone, at least at first. So, I would likely leave the room. I would head outside if I could, or toward any kind of nature – even opening a window would help.

Just allow it. Think of emotion as Energy in Motion – E-motion. It needs to flow. Breathing helps move the emotion through your body. It’s so easy to forget to breathe in the middle of intense emotion!

Be in it. Tune into your body – where are you experiencing this emotion physically? Your head? Your chest? Shoulders and neck?

If you feel like a victim, start processing all that happened to inspire these feelings. Have a pity party. Write down all of the events and feelings. Get them out into the open where you can refer back to them post-processing and sort out what is real, what is truth, what is story, what is assumption, and what is a product of your insecurities and limiting beliefs.

The time it takes to move through the emotion decreases as you get better at being with your pain.

At first, you may need a good 30 minutes, especially if an event was severe or historical. (If a reaction is hysterical, the cause is historical!)

What other possibilities exist?

What is in your control?

What outcome do you want? The desired outcome is not a necessary component of processing emotions, however, once your emotions are processed, you will have better logical judgment about what you want to happen next – if you need to go home, if you need to speak with someone, or if you are ready to face your co-workers and boss again.

You are under NO obligation to explain anything or apologize to anyone if you have dealt with your emotions healthfully. However, if someone was caught in the crossfire before you were able to process your emotion, you will have to decide if an apology is necessary to restore your integrity or your relationships. Depending on the severity of the blow, you may need to do much more than apologize and there may be irreversible consequences.

Learn from these consequences, prevent them in the future, and do not define yourself by these human moments.

What do you do as a leader when a team member is experiencing emotions?

Firstly, always validate emotions. Many managers and leaders do not want to be the recipient of anger, but this is a manifestation of ego, not empathy. So, even if the anger is directed at you, affirm that the person has a “right” to feel how they feel.

Ask them if they would like time to be alone or if they want to talk to you or with anyone else.

Be wary of pulling in human resources if human resources in your company is more inclined to react disciplinarily rather than resourcefully. At their best, human resources professionals are quite experienced and trained in serving in some counseling capacity, but there is too often a conflict of interest in processing events in compliance with policies and being fully emotionally available. There are also varying levels of severity that would certainly exceed the normal skill sets of human resources. If there is not a dedicated, licensed counselor or coach on staff, the best practice for HR is to refer the employee to other resources.

If you become the confidant. just listen. Don’t advise. Give the employee space to speak and process their emotions. Don’t try to fix anything, if there is anything for you as a leader to fix, until emotions have equalized. The message they need most is that you are committed to creating a safe place for them to share their emotions. You will have your own emotions about it, and you are justified in having those, too, but in this moment, just focus on listening. Eventually, it might be necessary to put your compassion into action. Allow yourself to process your own emotions before making any determinations, however.

If you and your company really want to demonstrate that you care and are willing to invest in the mental and emotional wellness of your team, allocate a room just for their emotional wellness.

What kinds of things would an emotional wellness room include?

A variety of tools to express a variety of emotions, from sadness to fear to anger.

  • Privacy
  • A box of tissues
  • Plants
  • A punching bag
  • A small table with chairs in case someone wants to talk it out
  • Papers and pens
  • Coloring books
  • Music/speakers
  • Pillows to scream into
  • Stuffed animals to squeeze or throw
  • A help button
  • A reference list for hotlines and guided meditations
  • A trampoline
  • Resistance bands
  • Exercise mats
  • A water fountain

Additional concerns I have that require additional research, perhaps research that has not yet been conducted, include finding out at what rate corporate leaders are medicated for mental illness. How does that impact their centers of empathy in the brain and their ability to make conscious decisions? I am sure there are instances in which the medication enhances their ability to handle stressful situations, but I wonder about the situations that are people-related.

I am not anti-medication generally, and no – I absolutely do not want to stigmatize taking medication. The side effects of many of these medications seem sometimes worse than the condition, and I do worry that drugs are too frequently prescribed when there are other therapies, coping mechanisms, and non-prescription solutions that would present better long-term options for enhanced mental health. I know many people who have found healthier alternatives to pharmaceuticals, are able to come off their prescribed medicines (under a doctor’s care), and then realize just how numb they had been. Numb is the most often used word.

I wonder how much more challenging it is to be empathetic when you are numb.

I hope for answers someday, and have been looking lately into pursuing a Ph.D. to dig into this deeper, among other research. If you have knowledge of any resources and/or research on this topic, please connect with me on social media. If you have a personal story about this, I would love to hear it.

How were you taught to deal with your emotions?

How were you taught to deal with other people’s emotions?

Guns N’ Roses – Don’t Cry

Music video by Guns N’ Roses performing Don’t Cry (Original Version). (C) 1991 Guns N’ Roses under exclusive license to Geffen Records

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

What We Can Learn From the Success of L’Oreal’s Mindfulness Program

Yesterday I attended an online L’Oreal mindfulness case study hosted by the Institute for Organizational Mindfulness and facilitated by Andy Lee, former Chief Mindfulness Officer at Aetna/current Senior Consultant for the Potential Project.

Jade Ku Sonlin, Assistant Vice President of People Development and Learning at L’Oreal, spent the hour talking about her personal mindfulness journey. She described how she went about gradually getting the C-level on board for a pilot, the success of that pilot, and how the pilot grew into a wellness program. She then expressed the continued impact on those who are now participating in that wellness program across the organization.

Sonlin started at L’Oreal in Marketing after burning out in LA agency life and adopting mindfulness as a practice.  Her marketing background proved very valuable in gaining buy-in and funding for this pilot (they outsourced to MindFresh.) Below are ways she applied her marketing know-how to eventually gain the approval and funds to move forward with a pilot.

Meet them where they are at

People are practicing mindfulness at some level, whether they know it or not. When you engage in activities in which you find yourself “in the flow,” take in all the details of something, and that moment before you do something that requires physical acuity when you take a breath you are practicing mindfulness. Sonlin’s boss is a mountaineer. He had some resistance to not just mindfulness, but also to the idea of dedicating time at work to it. So, Sonlin asked how he gets focused when he’s on a mountain in a precarious spot. He breathes. That was merely a seed planted that she could water later. More importantly, she now knew a way to frame mindfulness in a way that had relevance and resonance to him.

Throughout the pilot, they gathered feedback to continue to tap into messaging that would make the training more palatable, for instance eliminating names for yoga poses that weren’t understood by a non-yogi.

She also made sure the program was clearly named for what it was and dispelled some common myths, such as mindfulness is all about being still, or being still for long periods of time. In fact, there are various ways that you can practice mindfulness, and many take under 3 minutes!

Change is a marathon, not a sprint

Time is a precious commodity for anyone, but employers literally commoditize it. That’s why it’s not an easy sell to ask a company to spare any of it. The Aetna case study, which I had included in an accredited training that I did at an HR summit for my local SHRM chapter, proved that investing time in meditation creates … more time. (Read my Mindfulness and EI training report to find out more.)

Does that make people jump on board? Well, as Sonlin shared, mindfulness is a practice. This was repeated frequently throughout the training. So, not only is mindfulness training an investment of time, but something that must be practiced ongoingly in order to produce the ongoing benefits. You’re not just asking people to spare some time, but to accommodate something new permanently. That can feel overwhelming, especially for people currently experiencing burn out. This will likely cause resistance.

It is best implemented in stages for sustained longevity. First, it’s just about trying and learning. Then it’s noticing that trying and learning is making a difference. Then, it’s getting the brain to crave that difference and draw you into the practice, and that’s when you find yourself in a habit, or practice. The more social proof you can offer, the easier it becomes to enroll new people.

It starts with a ripple.

Offer evidence

Sonlin did a deep dive to find evidence that the investment of time and money would have business payoffs.  There are various case studies, some of which I’ve written about before. Since “because Google does it” is losing its luster as a compelling enough reason to try something, it’s thankfully really easy to point to the science.

The report I wrote a few years ago could have really come in handy for Sonlin since it lays out the science-based business case of mindfulness (and emotional intelligence) training.

L’Oreal’s mindfulness program was initiated in 2016, and Sonlin credits this program for L’Oreal employees sustaining productivity and morale during COVID.

Here are some other self-reported results from L’Oreal’s pilot participants:

  • 100% reported improved clarity
  • 96% reported increased patience
  • 95% reported it had a positive impact on their work
  • 84% discovered a technique that can use to de-stress

I have started to compile a curation of case studies to help you as a supplement to the Mindfulness and Emotional Intelligence Training report.

Mindfulness isn’t just a trend; it’s a breakthrough technology that will help forward-thinking leaders solve today’s and tomorrow’s problems. Read more about this in the report, and let me know if you want help promoting this to your company.

New Radicals – You Get What You Give (Original)

New Radicals Song Get What You Give…Ultimate 90’s Song!!I Claim NO Ownership Of This Song, All Credit Goes To New Radicals And Universal Music Group!!I Wis…

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Empowered Goals – Answer The Call To Conscious Leadership

Last week we had another groundbreaking Answer the Call to Conscious Leadership event with Kenston Henderson, Sr. and Jennifer Wildgust as panelists to talk about Empowered Goals.

I, actually, didn’t develop goals, and you might have seen me mention what I did instead last week. By watching the replay of last week’s event, you will learn how you can apply the same neuroscience hack to re-engage with your goals.

You’ll also get the answers to these questions:

  • What is the distinction between empowered goals and plain goals, or other kinds of goals?
  • How can empowered goals be used in leadership to manage at an individual and team level?
  • Where do you start when helping your team develop empowered goals?
  • How does the first week of the year help you set up a successful year?
  • What are the questions that need answers before you set empowered goals?
  • What is a critical component to staying motivated?
  • What are the reasons people fail to reach their goals, and how can the C3 group fill that void?
  • What are ingredients leaders can ensure their teams have to enjoy repeated success?
  • Where can a leader learn how to achieve huge goals?
  • What are the steps that need to be taken to maximize goal achievement?
  • What is the trick to developing empowered goals with your strong-willed “rebel” team members?
  • What is the trick to keeping your rebels accountable for their empowered goals?
  • How does the control-influence model come into play?
  • What are good questions to ask when reflecting on the previous year’s goals, especially after a year like 2020?
  • How can you use the unmet goals as fuel?
  • How do you allow yourself grace while not letting yourself off the hook?
  • How can you use your imagination to achieve your goals?
  • How can you mentally prepare yourself for possible hardships that can derail you?
  • What if your team members are not in a conducive emotional state when goal setting?
  • How can you help your team members process their emotions so that they can get into a conducive emotional and mental state to set empowered goals?
  • How can leaders guide their teams through building the habits that will support goal attainment?
  • How can you reinforce your team in achieving their empowered goals?
  • Why do we have to reframe failure?
  • No matter what happened, what do you have to do to continue crafting better goals?
  • What is the best metric for assessing goals?
  • What is the one thing that you think people need to know to feel empowered about moving forward?

When you watch the replay inside of C3, be sure to expand the screen so that you can see the insightful comments shared by the people viewing the event, too!

Our panelist, Jennifer, said, “I’ve learned so much in just this little bit of time!”

That’s what these events are all about! It’s so powerful to spend this hour on the first Thursday of every month leveling each other up.

I’m so grateful for the members of this community and look forward to offering them a spotlight to contribute to this cooperative movement toward conscious leadership.

***********************************

P.S. If you missed the LIVE information session on the Conscious Leadership Movement, I invite you and encourage you to watch the replay —  especially if you can’t help but take action to make the world a better place after recent events!

Is now the time for you to join this movement? Find out and find out how NOW, because I am ready to get started as soon as the pilot group is complete.  The world can’t wait!

I am offering a special DOUBLE certification PLUS LIFETIME ongoing conscious leadership education deal for THIS PILOT GROUP ONLY!  This offer expires on January 21st – or as soon as we have 5 pilot participants commit and invest!

Watch the reply until the end to find out all about it!

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.