Archives for achieve your goals

Authentic Leadership – Answer The Call To Conscious Leadership

During yesterday’s Answer the Call to Conscious Leadership event, Carl Shawn Watkins and Isabelle Dominique “D” Ross helped us delve into Authentic Leadership – the risks, rewards, landmines, and sticky situations that leaders can find themselves in, especially today.

In yet another value-packed hour, we explored all of the following, and more:

  • What does the concept of Authentic Leadership conjure in terms of self and others?
  • How does being an authentic leader allow for people to bring their whole selves to work?
  • What are the key qualities of being an authentic leader?
  • How does being an authentic leader nurture an environment that facilitates better problem-solving?
  • When you are bringing in new talent, and people are coming from various backgrounds with potential unawareness about moral standards?
  • How can keeping it real go wrong in leadership?
  • Keeping it real is so subjective, how can you reconcile that as a leader?
  • While leaders have subjective views about authenticity, how do you use yourself as a model to set moral expectations?
  • How do you own mistakes even amidst judgment?
  • What is the key ingredient in honoring self and honoring others as leaders?
  • How do you productively respond to a failure of your team to reach the moral bar while maintaining authenticity?
  • Does Cancel Culture inhibit or facilitate authentic leadership and at what point do we say leaders are no longer allowed to continue as leaders?
  • How do you determine a violation is unrecoverable?
  • How can leaders prevent crossing that line?
  • Do we want to create a climate in which we allow unconscious beliefs and thinking are free to emerge so that we can sort that out of leadership or at least address it?
  • How do you maintain your moral code in the midst of crisis when survival mode kicks in?
  • Which is better – working for a great boss in a smelly bathroom or a bad boss in a beautiful office?
  • How can we move through this cancel culture together to come to an agreement about what is moral?
  • What is the hardest part of authentic leadership?
  • What is the distinction between authentic leadership and authentic leadership under the umbrella of conscious leadership?
  • How do you come to recognize when you are justifying self-preservation over authenticity?
  • What is the right combination of moral standards, psychological safety, and accountability to ensure that you are in the learning zone versus in crisis mode?
  • How do you restore your team post-crisis?
  • What has science and practical experience prove is necessary for leaders to optimize mindset?
  • How are leaders preparing their team members for capacity expansion and growth?
  • Do we avoid letting opposite beliefs cause drama and division, while still fostering an environment where people feel free to bring their whole selves to work?
  • Is there a conflict between being authentic and bringing your whole self to work?

Recommended reading on Authentic Leadership:

Join the C3 community to watch the replay now, and feel free to engage with our panelists (or hosts) within the community.

Please let us know what conscious leadership topics you want to be covered for our March Answer the Call to Conscious Leadership event.

Tell Me It’s Real

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music GroupTell Me It’s Real · K-Ci & JoJoIt’s Real℗ A Geffen Records Release; ℗ 1999 UMG Recordings, Inc.Released on: 1999-…

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Empowered Goals – Answer The Call To Conscious Leadership

Last week we had another groundbreaking Answer the Call to Conscious Leadership event with Kenston Henderson, Sr. and Jennifer Wildgust as panelists to talk about Empowered Goals.

I, actually, didn’t develop goals, and you might have seen me mention what I did instead last week. By watching the replay of last week’s event, you will learn how you can apply the same neuroscience hack to re-engage with your goals.

You’ll also get the answers to these questions:

  • What is the distinction between empowered goals and plain goals, or other kinds of goals?
  • How can empowered goals be used in leadership to manage at an individual and team level?
  • Where do you start when helping your team develop empowered goals?
  • How does the first week of the year help you set up a successful year?
  • What are the questions that need answers before you set empowered goals?
  • What is a critical component to staying motivated?
  • What are the reasons people fail to reach their goals, and how can the C3 group fill that void?
  • What are ingredients leaders can ensure their teams have to enjoy repeated success?
  • Where can a leader learn how to achieve huge goals?
  • What are the steps that need to be taken to maximize goal achievement?
  • What is the trick to developing empowered goals with your strong-willed “rebel” team members?
  • What is the trick to keeping your rebels accountable for their empowered goals?
  • How does the control-influence model come into play?
  • What are good questions to ask when reflecting on the previous year’s goals, especially after a year like 2020?
  • How can you use the unmet goals as fuel?
  • How do you allow yourself grace while not letting yourself off the hook?
  • How can you use your imagination to achieve your goals?
  • How can you mentally prepare yourself for possible hardships that can derail you?
  • What if your team members are not in a conducive emotional state when goal setting?
  • How can you help your team members process their emotions so that they can get into a conducive emotional and mental state to set empowered goals?
  • How can leaders guide their teams through building the habits that will support goal attainment?
  • How can you reinforce your team in achieving their empowered goals?
  • Why do we have to reframe failure?
  • No matter what happened, what do you have to do to continue crafting better goals?
  • What is the best metric for assessing goals?
  • What is the one thing that you think people need to know to feel empowered about moving forward?

When you watch the replay inside of C3, be sure to expand the screen so that you can see the insightful comments shared by the people viewing the event, too!

Our panelist, Jennifer, said, “I’ve learned so much in just this little bit of time!”

That’s what these events are all about! It’s so powerful to spend this hour on the first Thursday of every month leveling each other up.

I’m so grateful for the members of this community and look forward to offering them a spotlight to contribute to this cooperative movement toward conscious leadership.

***********************************

P.S. If you missed the LIVE information session on the Conscious Leadership Movement, I invite you and encourage you to watch the replay —  especially if you can’t help but take action to make the world a better place after recent events!

Is now the time for you to join this movement? Find out and find out how NOW, because I am ready to get started as soon as the pilot group is complete.  The world can’t wait!

I am offering a special DOUBLE certification PLUS LIFETIME ongoing conscious leadership education deal for THIS PILOT GROUP ONLY!  This offer expires on January 21st – or as soon as we have 5 pilot participants commit and invest!

Watch the reply until the end to find out all about it!

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Dr. Alan Zimmerman’s Epic Career Tale

Listen to Dr. Alan Zimmerman’s Epic Career Tale

Dr. Zimmerman knew from an early age that he wanted to help people, but how evolved over the years, and it would appear that he was very right about his calling. Students at Minnesota State University were so hungry for what Dr. Zimmerman was teaching that they were willingly waiting two years to take his course. Since leaving academia, his lessons have been highly demanded by Fortune 100 companies.

You’re Not Really Fooling Anyone with Positive Thinking

Brain-to-brain (B2B) communication system overview, PLOS ONE http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0105225.g001

Brain-to-brain (B2B) communication system overview by PLOS ONE http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0105225.g001

Every single person has encountered an obstacle while pursuing a goal, be it changing jobs, starting a company, selling a home, retiring, and on and on. What do you do when that obstacle is staring you down?  Do you freeze in fear, then come down on yourself for procrastinating? Do you resign that the obstacle will mow you down and let it? Do you run toward it with greater momentum to overcome the obstacle? Do you zigzag around the obstacle? Do you ask your friends to help you and march arm in arm toward that obstacle? Hopefully, you will do one of the latter because in the first two examples, you are the obstacle. Your perception of the obstacle’s size and power compared to your own could be the actual thing that prevents you from succeeding. Of course, you want to address these obstacles pragmatically, but if you don’t address them holistically, the pattern will recur and you will find yourself facing similar obstacles over and over again.

I have developed programs, such as our Dream Job Breakthrough System, tools such as the Epic Careering Took Kit, and of course the one-on-one coaching I have provided since starting 10 years ago. While these are PRACTICAL guides in how to execute a successful and optimal transition, I have a personal and professional obligation to address the EMOTIONAL components of a job search. Emotional components are what make the difference between my clients following the steps with integrity to successfully and swiftly land and prolonged job searches, weakened momentum, and lower quality job offers (compared to what they could develop).

Most people perceive positive thinking to mean that in spite of your doubts, fears, resentments, etc., you put on a happy face and fake it. This almost always fails. Being positive is not the same as thinking positive, and it takes conscious effort to alter subconscious patterns that have most likely been with you for most of your life, often go unnoticed until you know how to identify the symptoms (usually unhappiness and dissatisfaction), and have ingrained neural pathways.

Interviewers use six senses to evaluate and qualify candidates. Even if you are trying your best to disguise your innermost doubts and fears, the interviewer is using intuition to tune into them. Even if you have a killer résumé and an answer for everything, you could still emit negative thoughts and energy. Recruiters rely heavily on gut feelings and they will ask questions to validate them, so exactly what you may want to hide could be exactly what they will ask you about. Questions are not just designed to identify competence, but also to expose positive and negative behavioral and mental patterns. The agenda of the interview is to identify each candidate’s unique value and unique risk. As the candidate, you want the interview more focused on your value, but your fears around the potential risks you pose can sway the interview more heavily toward mitigating risks, which diminishes your ability to build a competitive case against other contenders.

If you interview during a period of self-doubt, you will instill little faith in your abilities. Likewise, if you walk into an interview perceiving the interviewer as an adversary, he or she will sense your antagonism and act accordingly. Consider yourself screened out. The same is true in negotiating. If you expect the person to turn down your counteroffer rather than attempt to find a win-win solution, you will be turned down and both of you will lose.

None of us can change over night, but our brains have plasticity, so we can exercise our brains into condition to do amazing things.  This explains a lot of the stories of people who have accomplished what many thought impossible. It requires practice and determination, just like training for a physical feat. You must have patience and forgiveness for yourself if you fall short and reward yourself for your efforts and progress.

Disclaimer: I am not qualified to give psychological advice and I am also prone to negative thinking and I face difficulties in reversing that thinking. However, over the past eight years, I have avidly studied human performance optimization, quantum physics, and neuroscience. I have invested well over 10,000 hours in this study, and have become much more adept at minimizing the friction that negative, self-limiting thoughts cause. I see and experience, so I believe in acknowledging, confronting, releasing, and replacing these thoughts with ones that produce the good results you hope your actions will have.

For instance, being self-employed brings with it many moments of uncertainty. I know I am in the profession that I was made for, however, finding the balance between investing in projects and products, and generating revenue and cash flow has been tricky, especially over these past four years as I build a mobile app and other low-price point job search tools and products. Once I made up my mind that I wanted to generate a regular, predictable income, and took inspired action, I not only generated multiple opportunities, but I also had several come out of the blue, and ultimately accepted a position that aligned me with a highly reputable, quality-focused outplacement provider (CCI Consulting) that enables me to do exactly what I love to do with as much flexibility as I want.

Meditation, prayer, writing, yoga, fitness, hiking/biking, and eating well have done wonders for my self-awareness and self-esteem. In addition, below are some resources that you can investigate on Amazon.com and there are even some free audio versions of the books on YouTube. Many of these can be found on CD or DVD:

7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen Covey

The Miracle Morning, by Hal Elrod

Think and Grow Rich, by Napoleon Hill

The 8th Habit, by Stephen Covey

The Road Less Traveled, by M. Scott Peck, M.D.

How Full Is Your Bucket?, by Tom Rath and Donald O. Clifton, Ph.D.

The Brain That Changes Itself, by Norman Doidge

Radical Careering, by Sally Hogshead

Secrets of the Hidden Job Market, by Janet White

The Secret, by Rhonda Byrne

The Science of Getting Rich, by Wallace D. Wattles

Having It All, by John Assaraf

The Laws of Spirit, by Dan Millman

If you are like me, a questioner, according to Gretchen Rubin’s Four Tendencies, you need to understand the science behind why investing time on your thoughts impacts your reality before you take any action. Here are some great books on that:

How Enlightenment Changes Your Brain: The New Science of Transformation, by Andrew Newberg and Mark Robert Waldman

The Biology of Belief, by Dr.Bruce Lipton

The Field, by Lynn McTaggart

The Intention Experiment (Read The Field first), by Lynn McTaggart

Being positive vs. thinking positive does not mean that you will suddenly become a perfect person; we are all still human. It means that you will have greater awareness when your thoughts are not serving you, and you will have tools to change their impact so that you will see better results more of the time.

 

This sounds like therapy, but I liken it to coaching because it is not as much about validation as it is about accountability. It is nice to understand how we became the way we are, but it is much more critical to our happiness to be empowered to change ourselves and our world.

 

Create Your Best Year Yet, Part 2

Goal Setting by Angie Torres of Flickr

Goal Setting by Angie Torres of Flickr

Do you feel as if you lived up to your potential during the last year? Are you still playing catch-up from the hits you took during the economic slump? Are you ready to make big changes in your professional life? Your previous year may not have been the best in terms of job success, but now is your chance to make a rebound and create the breakthroughs you desire. You are no longer bound by the shortcomings of the previous year. New job search adventures that enable you to put your life on an upward track await you. Now is the time to create your best year yet!

Creating your best year starts with attainable goals that allow you to achieve your dreams. Take a moment to reflect on your highs and lows from the previous year. If any attachments from the previous year are holding you back, take the time to release them. Where have you been and where would you like to proceed? Remember, where you have been does NOT limit where you can go. What are your biggest career goals? What have you done to achieve them? If your biggest goal is to simply land a new job, it is time to dream and plan bigger. Now is your time! Now is your greatest year! However, you will not obtain your best year yet without planning, especially in your job search. What do you want from a future employer? What are your long-term career goals? How quickly do you want to land? How do you want your job to enhance your life? Once you have your goals in mind write them down and create a plan of action, and commit to that action.

 

1. What are your counter-desires?

Once you have decided what your career goals are, and what you do and do not want from your next job, it is time to consider your counter-desires. As Esther Hicks, an inspirational speaker, puts it, “Any time you decide what you don’t want, a counter-desire is born.” This is a logical place to decide what you want. Approach your counter-desires with the mindset that achieving your goals is possible, and that you deserve to complete them. Think about it in this manner- if anyone else has completed it, you do not need any further evidence that it is possible. Why not you? We know that plenty of people search for and land jobs. There are no reasons why you cannot do the same. Most people have challenges; all you need are solutions (we have those!). Look for inspiration from others who are already where you want to be.

 

2. Sit down and decide what your career goals are

Career goals are more than just settling for the first employer that will hire you, or finding a new position with a higher salary. Sitting down, figuring out what is best for you, and writing those goals down are critical first steps. Evaluate and reflect upon what you want from an employer in order to feel fulfilled. If you plunge head first into a job search without goals, or a plan of action, you risk being dissatisfied in the long-run. This could be in the form of a continued job search that extends for several more months, or landing a position with an employer you are not passionate about. Take the time to set goals to ensure that you have a solid vision of how your job search will flow and that you have a desired end-goal in mind, beyond landing.

Setting goals can consist of creating micromovements as a way to get started. Think about setting smaller goals that can be done in five minutes or less, as you move toward your larger goal. These goals will propel you forward in your job search, help you determine what you do and do not want, make a seemingly difficult task less difficult, and will help ignite your drive during your search as you build goal-achieving momentum. Who can’t find five minutes to move toward their goals?

 

3. Develop your S.M.A.R.T. goals to form a plan of action

I fully believe in the phrase, “work smarter, not harder.” S.M.A.R.T. goals are an excellent way to begin setting realistic goals that are achievable. I was impressed when I learned that Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business teaches their seniors how to develop S.M.A.R.T. goals for their job search in the mandatory Career Management course I teach. S.M.A.R.T. goals are defined as:

Specific: Do not be vague. Exactly what do you want?

Measurable: Quantify your goal. How will you know if you have achieved it or not?

Attainable: Be honest with yourself about what you can reasonably accomplish at this point in your life- along with taking your current responsibilities into consideration. It has to be doable, real, and practical.

Results-oriented: What is the ideal outcome? How will you know you achieved your goal?

Time: Associate a timeframe with each goal. When should you complete the goal and/or the steps associated with completing the goal?

S.M.A.R.T. goals, as opposed to common goals, enable you to be optimally effective in developing and achieving your goals.

For example:

A common job search goal may be to land a job soon.

A S.M.A.R.T. job search goal would be to land at one of your top five choices within two months, by contacting ten people each week, and setting up at least two meetings each week.

Goals2Go has an excellent tutorial video and worksheets on how to develop, set, and apply S.M.A.R.T. goals.

 

 

Goals-Theres-no-telling- Jim Rohn

 

 

Your previous year may not have been your best year. You may have felt as if you did not live up to your professional and economic potential. Or perhaps you are still recovering from the economic slump. Now is the best time to create your best year yet. Leave the difficulties of the previous year behind by starting the New Year with attainable career goals. These are goals you have taken the time to carefully develop in a  S.M.A.R.T. way, these goals are an obtainable plan of action, and they form a vision for what your job search will look like. You will dream big, land quickly, and obtain the position you want at an employer that excites and fulfills you. Can you feel it? This IS your best year yet!

 

Top 10 Corrective Actions to “Fix” Your Job Transition

Photo courtesy of JD Hancock (http://bit.ly/1whbJh7) "The Fix Is In" : Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0) on flickr creative commons.

Photo courtesy of JD Hancock (http://bit.ly/1whbJh7) “The Fix Is In” : Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0) on flickr creative commons.

The good news is that there are a lot of people out there who want to help you find a job.  The bad news is that not all of the advice out there is good.  In fact, some of it, when followed, will stand between you and the job you want and need.

There are also things that job seekers do that completely contradict the good advice that is out there.  It never ceases to amaze and alarm me that job seekers spend their time engaged in activities that do absolutely nothing to help them achieve their goals when there are so many enjoyable activities that will.

Here are the top 10 things that I have personally seen done in the last 8+ years with alarming volume and the things that can be done instead to help job seekers gain and sustain momentum in their job search.

  1. Asking people who cannot personally vouch for your performance to help you get an interview in their company

People currently in a job that they want or need will make keeping their job a priority.  They will not do anything to jeopardize their reputation or the well being of their organization.  They will, however, be sure to make recommendations that have a high chance of improving their company or make them look good.

Corrective Action: Request a new contact’s time to better understand the organization’s needs.  Inspire them to give you an introduction to the stakeholders so that you can recommend solutions, even if the solutions are other people.

  1. Inviting people you don’t know to connect on LinkedIn with no indication of why they should want to connect

Certainly, there are a lot of people out there who want to help.  Even helpful people have a limit to their time and their willingness to help strangers who may abuse the network that they have invested time in nurturing.  You DO have a lot more to offer than just filling an open position in a company.  You have a network of your own and solutions to problems.

Corrective Action: When you identify a contact who may be able to assist you, review the contact’s profile for indications of how you or your network might be able to serve him or her, such as in the recent status updates.  Then, write an invitation that requests a phone or in-person meeting to discuss how you can help each other before you join each other’s network.  Then once you do connect, use the notes field of the profile to record what you identified as that person’s needs and be proactive to follow up on them.

  1. Using a boilerplate message to invite people to LinkedIn or importing contacts

About every article or speaker that I have ever seen on the subject of LinkedIn has advised users to replace the boilerplate LinkedIn invitation. Unfortunately, almost all of LinkedIn’s screens inform you of people you can invite, or prompt you to do so, without giving you the ability to customize your message. You actually have to visit their profile and click on the CONNECT icon to have the option to customize your message.

Corrective Action: Personalize every message and be explicit as to what assistance you are seeking while offering yourself and your network to help with their initiatives.

  1. Asking a company that has extended an offer to wait for you to hear from other companies

Let’s say you were on a date and it went well and you asked for a second date for next Friday, but he or she wants to wait until next Thursday to let you know.  Now let’s say they told you that they wanted to wait until Thursday because they want to see if a hotter date is going to pan out or not.  Now let’s say you’ve been dating for months and you proposed, but your amore wants to explore his or her feelings for someone else before giving you an answer.  When you consider that a company spends weeks or months trying to find that special someone, and you usually have weeks to consider the company as a match, more time to consider an offer puts the company at risk that they might have to start the process all over again.

Corrective Action: Request 48 hours to evaluate a company’s WRITTEN offer and give them an answer in that time.

  1. Going above the hiring manager’s head to get ahead in the interview process

If you are already in consideration for a position, there are ways that you can improve your chances, but there are also ways to hurt your chances.  Trying to engage inside advocates often just creates internal conflict.  Most hiring is not done democratically.  A new person can really tip morale one way or another, so everyone has a vested interest in who gets hired, but few have the authority to do the hiring.  Keeping a company’s politics in check so that it does not affect productivity is already a tricky enough task.  Asking someone to “pull some strings” if they are not the hiring manager is a request that can put everyone in an uncomfortable position.

Corrective Action: When you identify additional contacts in an organization, ask them to help you gain additional perspective on the organization’s problems (without jeopardizing confidentiality) and discuss potential solutions.  Then you can include this insight in the WRITTEN thank you note that you send to the hiring manager and any other stakeholders who were involved in the interview process.

  1. Ask people to pass on leads for positions that match your job title

Chances are, even if you are “flexible,” you have more criteria to the job that you would accept than it just matching a job title.  Logically, it may make sense that the more general you are when you ask people to keep alerted to positions for you, the more leads you will receive.  Practically, however, your function in a company rarely cleanly matches a job title and not only will you receive job leads that you will not want to follow up on, but the people who pass them on will be discouraged and less likely to pass something on if they think you will not follow up.  Also, by the time a posted position makes it to you, it is often too late in the game to be considered.

Corrective Action: Explain to people what problems you solve, for whom, and what conversations they might hear that indicate that an introduction would be beneficial to all parties. When you do receive a lead that does not fit, but includes a contact name, follow up, be forthright and offer to help them find the right candidate.

  1. Only seeking the help of those in your field

Back to the song from Sesame Street, “Who are the people in your neighborhood?”  Think about the people who see other people all the time.  People in your field may see other people in your field, but they also might be limited to seeing people in their field that only work for their company, and once they exhaust their own company as a viable employer for you, there may be past colleagues.  According to a University of Virginia study, we are all connected by no more than seven degrees of separation.  If you are on LinkedIn, it probably surprises you how you are connected to people.  It is very visible once you put your network into a digital map.  What about the rest of your network, however?  What about your dentist, your mailman, your landscaper, the cashier at your favorite lunch spot? They also see other people all the time!

Corrective Action: Make inquiries of people who are outside of your professional realm to see who and what they know that might help you find out who has problems that you can solve.

  1. Asking other people what kind of job you should be pursuing

When you are doing a self-discovery process to determine what your next line of work will be, the input of others is sometimes helpful; it is impossible to be objective about yourself, after all.  However, no one should know more about what you want than you.  People generally have great intentions when they make suggestions, but most of their reasons will be in direct contrast to YOUR priorities.

Corrective Action: Give other people an idea of what you consider to be your strengths and what you suspect you would want to contribute to an organization.  Ask for suggestions and make a list.  Identify at least 3 people for each potential path who are willing to share with you what the challenges and rewards of that role are.  Compare these with your concerns and greatest desires.  Narrow the list down to one and design your campaign (or ask us for help).

  1. Using job market data to determine the viability of your job transition

When the Bureau of Labor and Statistics gather and disseminate information, it is comprehensive.  When the media reports it, it is simplistic and usually bleak.  If an area is “growing,” so is your competition in that area.  What is growing today may be shrinking tomorrow.  Those who survive will be the ones with the highest qualifications and passion.  Also, it is not as important to know who is NOT getting a job as it is to know who IS getting a job and why.

Corrective Action: Pursue the position that is most viable for you – the one that genuinely aligns with your talents and motivations.

  1. Spending more than 10% of your transition time on job boards

When job boards first became commonplace, they did more good than harm.  Now they are a necessary evil. Companies need to track their candidate applications and are required to keep records on what actions are taken.  That does not make job boards the best way for you to be noticed or invited for an interview. You may still have to submit your information through a company’s website to comply with their human resources procedures. You do NOT have to start there.

Corrective Action: Track the time that you spend on your transition, including social engagements, as long as you leverage them.  Adjust your weekly activity so that no more than 5% of your time is spent on job boards.  Set up agents on the aggregating sites (Indeed, Simply Hired) and check them ONLY twice a week.  Once you identify a desirable position on a job board, go straight to LinkedIn or niche recruiters to find a better way to get in front of the hiring manager.  Use the online application offered by job boards as a LAST RESORT.