Archives for March 2021

Guest Post: Increasing Access to Opportunity

This week’s post is written for you by C3 community member, Isabelle Dominique “D” Ross, as an invitation to join us tomorrow, April 1st at 1:00 p.m. ET, for our discussion on Increasing Access to Opportunity. Dominique will be a guest panelist during tomorrow’s event, along with Sharon R. Clinton, Deputy Executive Director at the City of Philadelphia. Please be sure to join the C3 Community to join the discussion tomorrow and connect with the guest panelists and members.

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I’m looking forward to the upcoming “Answer the Call to Conscious Leadership” event, which is facilitated by Coaches Karen Huller and Lawrence Henderson, because this month’s panel will be discussing a topic that I’m deeply invested in and passionate about— “Increasing Access to Opportunity.” Friends and even connections who know me well can attest that this is a topic I will readily discuss at length.

Consider these questions:

  • How many of the organization’s lower-level and mid-level supervisors and managers can competently explain their tuition assistance or education and certification reimbursement programs, particularly if they’ve never accessed those programs themselves?
  • Do the organization’s team members understand the Employee Stock Purchase Plan or the 401K’s investment options? What about Employee Assistance Programs? What do those entail?
  • Why would an employee opt to access these benefits or maximize these opportunities?

Why is this topic so meaningful to me? I’ll share just a few snippets from my own journey in accessing opportunities.I was born overseas and I had a very “atypical” upbringing, so when I finally came to live in the US at the age of 19, I’d only formally completed a sixth-grade education. I quickly realized that my scholastic background severely limited my potential career options, so within several months of arriving in the US, I took and passed the General Education Development (GED) test and joined the Air Force.

In 1998, following my first couple of military assignments, I finally mustered the courage to register for my first college course with the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA), using my military tuition assistance benefits. I was an active-duty military member, which meant I was already working full-time, and in my mid-twenties when I got started, so I was a “non-traditional student.” I knew I was coming from behind academically, and I’d have a long, long way to go to “catch up.” Because I was uncertain about my ability to succeed in taking college-level classes, I took just one speech class that the first semester, so I was excited to earn my first “A” grade in the course. The next year, I decided I could handle two classes at once, and the following year, three at a time. Due to my deficient formal educational background, especially in math and science subjects, I was required to take both “Elementary Algebra” and “Intermediate Algebra” before I could even qualify to complete “College Algebra” and satisfy the Basic College-Level Skills requirement for my undergraduate degree (I later learned during my graduate studies that needing to pay for and take remedial courses that “don’t count” can be a significant factor in why some individuals don’t complete their college studies, but I was fortunate to have tuition assistance benefits that paid for the majority of my undergraduate studies).

With my confidence buoyed after a few successful semesters, I’d set a new, more ambitious goal: I decided to finish my degree and apply for a commissioning program to become an Air Force Officer. However, since I’d merely taken one class that first semester of 1998, and then had only completed two classes per semester during the fall of 1999 and the spring of 2000, I knew I needed to get creative and find alternate ways to accelerate my studies if I was going to have any chance at completing my bachelor’s degree during the rest of my time in Alaska. To accomplish this, I became an avid researcher of the academic catalogs and the policies and processes within the university’s programs. By the time I earned my Bachelor of Arts degree in Russian Language from UAA in the Spring of 2003, I’d not only amassed 88 credits through the university, but I’d also earned eight additional natural science credits through academic petitions, and 52 credits through the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES) testing and the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), which allowed me to apply for the commissioning program the following year.

Throughout my undergraduate studies, I developed and honed invaluable skills in researching, identifying, and demystifying academic and organizational requirements, policies and processes, that I’ve since applied to my subsequent graduate studies, pursuing and earning the Project Management Professional (PMP) and Professional in Human Resources (PHR) credentials, and in accessing other, sometimes obscure, organizational professional development and total rewards programs. The best part in all of this though is that I’ve been able to use these capabilities to guide and mentor others in doing the same.

My culminating assignment in the Air Force was as Instructor of English, Study Skills, and Honors, an Academic Advisor, and Dean’s Executive Assistant at the U.S. Air Force Academy Preparatory School, where the mission is, “to motivate, prepare, and evaluate selected candidates in an academic, military, moral, and physical environment, to perform successfully and enhance diversity at the Air Force Academy.” Nearly 20 years before, I’d begun my Air Force journey with a sixth-grade education and a GED, and I was able to close out my time, serving others who came from similar backgrounds who wouldn’t have otherwise had access to those opportunities—they were prior-enlisted service members, first-generation college students, English Language Learners, etc.

Many years ago, during my time at UAA, I purchased a bookmark that featured a quote from Epictetus: “Only the educated are free.” That maxim became my mantra and the impetus for my educational and professional pursuits over the years. When I think about what it means to be “educated,” I see it as any learning event, program, or experience, whether it’s a formal higher education program or otherwise, that can propel an individual to that “next level,” enhancing their quality of life and their overall sense of well-being, not only for themselves but also their family members.

Being “free” means having options and choices. Discovering, accessing, and maximizing opportunities transformed my life, and there is no greater reward for me personally than being a conduit who helps another individual access an opportunity that leads to greater freedom in even just one aspect of their life.

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Special thanks to Dominique for this guest post. Please join the C3 Community to get the access link for tomorrow’s event and to be a part of future events as well.

Four Tops – Reach Out (I’ll Be There) (1967) HD 0815007

HQ-Video. Four Tops – Reach Out (I’ll Be There), ein Hit im Jahr 1966.

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Own Your Words, Own Your World

How many times have you made a judgment call about a person based on a comment they made?

Did that comment really define them and was your judgment accurate? How do you know? Does it matter?

Here’s why it’s been mattering lately.

  • Co-creation – Pharma companies worked together to expedite clinical trials and get out a critically needed vaccine to the world. We have other crises that need solutions.
  • Opportunity – Because of the above, the in-demand skills of today and tomorrow are people-related. Though some are trying, this is a functional area that isn’t expected to be ethically automated with any kind of efficacy.
  • Racial Justice – Silenced and discouraged voices are piping up much louder while they face continued resistance and suppression. We’re not going back to how it was before George Floyd. There’s too much work to do!
  • Division – Politics and personal freedom have literally divided families during one of the loneliest times imaginable for people of this time.
  • We have just had 7 mass shootings in 7 days. Clearly unresolved issues are a public threat.

Some unexpected aspects of accountability in leadership came up yesterday while Lawrence Henderson and I were on Clubhouse (which we are every other Tuesday, so please follow us and join us on the app @BossLLab and @ripplemaker).

The consensus seems to be that the art of civil discourse is lost. The perception of recent conflict seems to be that it has been counter-productive. Lawrence and I are huge fans of Cy Wakeman’s No Drama approach. What’s the difference between drama and conflict?

It’s drama when:

  • You have an issue with someone and, instead of addressing the source, you involve other people.
  • You address the source, but are combative and/or accusatory.
  • You allow your conflict with someone to prohibit your performance and fall short of expectations.
  • The source of the issue is a perception, not a truth, and that perception drives decisions.

However, conflict is necessary for innovation. And, it’s necessary for conscious leadership. We may have learned that confronting someone makes things worse. The thing is, few are trained to effectively address conflicts, so what we see is conflict making things worse, now more than ever.

Social media has enabled keyboard warriors to develop habits and expectations that real-world consequences for words put out into the world don’t exist. Is this what has bled into the workplace, or was it something else?

  • Was it the fear that a confrontation can erupt into violence?
  • Was it the idea that we should leave emotions at the door?
  • Was it the constant threat of litigation?
  • Was it punitive Human Resources practices for causing workplace drama/toxicity?
  • Was it ill-advised codes of conduct and compliance training?

Too many trainings right now use subjective language, like “good values,” “professional conduct,” and “respect and dignity”. Another speaker in the Clubhouse room, Tamiko Drummond says that Human Resources needs to own properly training each and every manager on facilitating conflict From the top, leaders need to encourage going deeper into conflict rather than side-stepping it.

Ms. Drummond advises people to ask for clarification when they hear something about which they are passing judgment. “Unpack that statement for me” is a phrase she recommends. I’ve shared before how my former boss’s catchphrase was “help me understand.” At the women’s event I wrote about last week, one leader shared this list of responses to micro-aggressions.

Lawrence shared a story about one of the first private sector leaders he had who shocked him by asking him how he’d like to be approached when he was having a bad day. Wow! What an amazing question! She went on to teach and demonstrate that conflict is inevitable, and when it’s dealt with appropriately, it can make a working relationship that much stronger.

In our last Clubhouse room two weeks ago, one of the most poignant phrases shared by a speaker in the room was “Silence is dangerous.” Just because you aren’t actively hearing about a problem, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist and won’t sabotage progress. Ignorance is only bliss temporarily. Furthermore, ignorance is becoming increasingly unacceptable to those who have been marginalized. Silence is the antithesis of progress, so don’t expect your comments to go without response anymore.

We talked yesterday about how anonymous 360s can be as destructive to morale and team cohesion as social media posts from keyboard warriors. Anonymous feedback is so widely used to identify performance issues, and has led to such mistrust and discouragement. It breeds a lack of accountability for what is said. When there is a void of accountability, there tends to be a perception spin machine. It wastes a lot of energy and resources.

Next, we talked about how to determine if the feedback is even accurate. Another speaker in the Clubhouse Room, Ray Abram, author of Connect Like a Boss, recommended a tool called the Johari Window. This can help leaders determine if there’s a perception issue or an opportunity for growth and development.

I shared another story about my boss, who had been informed that I was not pulling my weight, and that’s why my team was underperforming. I refuted those claims and he gave me the biggest gift. I had suspected for months that two women in the office who had become suspiciously silent toward me were gossiping about me. One I addressed directly; I thought we were friends. She coldly told me there was no problem. The other was on my team and had accused me of underperforming, which I supposed our other teammates agreed with. Thankfully, I had been working with a mentor and all activities were tracked in a database, so the resolution my bosses proposed was to get everyone in the room and put everyone’s cards on the table. The issue was diagnosed as a “perception problem.” I left the firm not long after to start Epic Careering, with my reputation and relationships intact thanks to that meeting.

When people are accountable, they want to know (and need to know) if there is an issue. There are many different ways people communicate. Some are more effective than others, but thankfully communication is a skill everyone can develop – if they’re willing.

So, for the sake of innovation and progress, what opportunities do you have in front of you to question a perception you have about someone?

Come Talk to Me

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

I Am A Feminist

I’ve never identified as a feminist. Perhaps that is because I was taught by the men in my life that it was a dirty word.

I might have even learned that being a feminist would damage my reputation and opportunity, assuming the doors to those opportunities had to be opened by a man, which is still largely too true. It could have been because the media of my time portrayed feminists as nerdy, angry, and unlikeable – three things that I aimed not to be. Perhaps it’s because I have often experienced my own gender being unkind, judgmental, and deliberately demeaning. Perhaps it’s because women have ripped off my ideas without giving me credit. Men have, too, but these women are in women’s professional support groups. I have not embraced nor been embraced by these groups.

Why is that?

This week, I attended a Future Works Alliance event led by its founder, Anne Gemmell, called Women, Work and COVID: The Future is Still Female. During that event, the question was asked: Why aren’t women women’s biggest allies in making it to the C-Suite?

Why do we find that more often than not, women are apt to not let other women shine too brightly?

Sharon Clinton, Deputy Executive Director of Culture, Compliance and Organizational Infrastructure in the Philadelphia Mayor’s Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity, who led the breakout room discussion on racial and gender bias on the path to C-Suite, asserted that perhaps it’s because women at the top have scars from the battles they fought to get there. Perhaps there is a potential resentment for women who achieve the same without or with fewer scars.

When I likely needed it most, I avoided mom’s clubs. I tried them, and they were exactly as I feared – a bunch of women judging other women.

Since we were young, we have sacrificed each other to save face, tearing each other down hoping it would lift us up. These were the dynamics of female dominance that we learned. We rewarded each other for making fun of each other whether it was through prank calls or whispers. Gossip was like social capital. If you had some, everyone wanted to talk to you. It’s even worse now with social media.

I have to be honest – I don’t think I would have made it out of middle school alive had there been social media! I knew very few nice girls who did not succumb to these twisted power games. These girls usually, smartly, were well-liked by all, but not super close with anyone. It was as if the closer you got to a friend, the more drama ensued. We dealt with our own insecurities by redirecting people’s attention to the flaws of others.

You’d think we’d all grow out of it.

Some of us have. Some of us, honestly, have not.

I gave up vying for popularity in high school and sought out diverse relationships instead; I joined clubs. There was always so much drama among my girl friends (and that didn’t change much even as we aged). Sometimes I felt more comfortable with guy friends – equally loyal, less dramatic.

I’m a sorority girl, and from my impression of women’s groups, you may not get that. I did not intend to pledge a sorority; I was recruited by a friend from high school. Those girls got to know me and, not only accepted me for who I was, mistakes and all, but also appreciated and celebrated my uniqueness. The sorority I chose and that chose me still has an active alumni association. In fact, we will meet virtually this weekend for our annual luncheon. Pledging, for all intents and purposes, was like training in how to be the most sister-like friend you can be. Was there drama? Yes. Did everyone like each other? No. However, groupthink influenced a sense of loyalty and collaboration that superseded personal conflicts. It was actually a GREAT experience in working in harmony with other women, and I wish more women had the same type of experience. From what I discern, not all sorority pledging and sisterhoods accomplish this, but it seems Vice President Kamala Harris has enjoyed such an experience.

My first job in recruiting was in an all-female boutique executive search firm. I hadn’t realized how well women could work together and nurture each other without men around until I had this experience. How I missed those days when I had been psychologically bullied and bad-mouthed by “mean girls.”

When I started my company, most of my clientele were men purely because I was coming from technical recruiting, and technology is dominated by men. My mentors were men. I had a male business coach advise me to put my picture on my website to leverage my (much younger) appearance to attract more of my target audience. (I didn’t – that was never for what I wanted to be valued, especially by clients.) I had known women more experienced than I, but they didn’t really do much for my career. In fact, they usually took more than they gave.

The Harvard Business Review found in 2010 that women are over-mentored yet under-sponsored, and that remains true. Men continue to get promoted more than women. There are also deficiencies in other kinds of sponsorship, such as childcare support.

This is a problem that impacts us all. Data shows huge economic losses linked to racial and gender disparities and lack of sufficient childcare.

Over 2.5 million women lost their jobs during the pandemic. In December 2020, 100% of people who lost their jobs were women, according to data cited by Congresswoman Lisa Blunt Rochester (D-DE) this past Tuesday.

Our current climate of rugged individualism has proven to be not only toxic to overall mental health, but has proven to be devoid of any benefit even to the individual. Shared prosperity has not been shared by all, as the Congresswoman also pointed out on Tuesday. Data shows that even prosperous people would be that much more prosperous if populations who have been left behind were given the opportunity to catch up.

A McKinsey report from August of 2019 explains the economic impacts of closing the racial wealth gap. Their data shows that by closing the gap, the U.S. GDP would rise by 4-6% in 10 years.

A study by the International Monetary Fund also links higher growth to industries and countries with more women in the workforce and greater gender equality.

Keeping all of this in mind, it seems logical to me that enabling more people to prosper by eliminating their obstacles and challenges to doing so is beneficial to everyone. By empowering people with education and training, and ensuring that they have equal access to resources and opportunity, you have fewer people needing financial support from the government and more people contributing to innovation and progress. Growth is accelerated when efforts are focused on the populations with the most challenges and least access.

Growing up, we made ourselves susceptible to feeling as if we deserved the criticism of boy/men. I bought into it. I let the men in my life define me as a woman and I rejected female influence because of how bad it made me feel. Well, I have two daughters now and that ends with me! The gender revolution is far from over. I see now how much my resignation has hindered ALL genders and races. It’s time I stand up for women!

So, I proudly declare: I am a feminist!

Women have not stepped up fully because hurt people hurt people. Women, it’s time we heal ourselves to heal each other. It’s time we fully step into our divine feminine power and be in awe of ourselves and each other. It’s time WE define what being a woman is, intentionally. While we demand respect and recognition from our male counterparts, we need to do this for each other as well. Let’s heal together.

Diana Ross – I’m Coming Out

From the 1980 Motown album, “diana”

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

Leading With Vulnerability – Answer The Call To Conscious Leadership

Vulnerability in leadership proved to be a very fruitful topic, and I thank our C3 community for selecting it as our March Answer the Call to Conscious Leader event topic. Senior Human Resources Leader, Vince Blando, and The Believe Coach, Nick Dillon, offered us invaluable insight from their personal experience as leaders who model vulnerability. If you didn’t make it live, catch the replay by joining the C3 community.

Here are the questions we answered in our hour-long discussion:

  • How can you create other leaders who model vulnerability?
  • How can you be a true vulnerable leader?
  • Can you really be open to every opportunity without being open and vulnerable yourself?
  • What does being vulnerable really require of leaders?
  • What does vulnerability feel like when you don’t possess those qualities?
  • How did our panelists develop those qualities?
  • Why do you have to be willing to be vulnerable?
  • What happens when a leader holds back?
  • Are people born leaders?
  • When does being vulnerable serve a leader well and when doesn’t it?
  • What is it that you express to people that makes vulnerability an effective leadership tool?
  • What is something we all need up-skilling in?
  • How can a leader who admits being vulnerable inspire a team member to elevate performance?
  • How does lacking vulnerability backfire?
  • What is the major gap that keeps leaders from being effectively vulnerable?
  • What do leaders need to do to welcome vulnerability?
  • What is it about being a vulnerable leader that enables your team to show up as their best selves?
  • What is the only way to be effective as a leader these days?
  • What are perceptions of vulnerability that are now very outdated and need to go?
  • What happens when you are a vulnerable performer working for a leader who does not model vulnerability?
  • What happens if you grow weary of being available to your team members?
  • Is it appropriate to show your team members that you feel their pain or should you detach?
  • How has compartmentalizing pain and trauma been working?
  • How have our panelists navigated modeling and normalizing vulnerability in the workplace?
  • Why is now the time for us to go from aspirational to executable in being whole at work?
  • How do we gain traction in the movement to normalize vulnerability and empathy?
  • What are the consequences of not enabling empathy in the workplace?
  • What are the hard business reasons companies need to go in this direction?
  • What is the only true way to attain 360˚ leadership and be effective?
  • Do people leave jobs or leaders?
  • What happens when people practice the new brand of leadership in traditional business environments?
  • Where can a leader start introducing vulnerability in traditional business environments?
  • Where do EAPs fall short and how does a leader fill that gap?
  • How has the lack of financial stability spurred a greater need for vulnerability in leadership?
  • When your past has mistakes, what is the mindset to move forward from that as a vulnerable leader?
  • What does the military teach around leadership and does it conflict or align with being a vulnerable leader?
  • What is a major mistake that leaders make after having success in leadership that inhibits vulnerability?
  • What is “contextual empathy”?
  • What does a leader have to do to maintain psychological safety to continually nurture vulnerability?
  • What are the landmines associated with being a vulnerable leader?

Recommended reading: Brené Brown, The Power of Vulnerability: Teachings on Authenticity, Connection and Courage.

Once in the C3 Community, make sure you engage – like, comment, further the conversation, invite panelists and other members to connect.

Potential future ATCCL topics this conversation spurred:

  • Increasing access to resources and exposure to opportunity
  • Contextual empathy

Are you an expert in any of these topics? Introduce yourself inside of the C3 community and maybe you’ll be a panelist!

Here are other upcoming opportunities to share the stage with your C3 co-hosts:

Are you on Clubhouse?

Every other Tuesday at 1:15 p.m. EST, including this week, March 9th, Lawrence and I will be going live on Clubhouse to further discuss topics related to conscious leadership and find out what content the conscious leadership community most demands.

>> Follow us both on Clubhouse – Karen: @ripplemaker and Lawrence: @bossllab

On Twitter?

I have returned to do Twitter chats. Join me Wednesday, March 10th at 11 AM EST to engage in Q&A around Conscious Leadership by following me @EpicCareering and the hashtag #ConsciousLeaderChat.

See you there!

The Human League – Human

Vote for your favourite 80s hit of all time: https://lnk.to/80BestHitsListen to more from The Human League: http://TheHumanLeague.lnk.to/EssentialsStream a p…

Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business. As an instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy, she has helped two of her students win the 2018 National Competition to be named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, to win the 2019 People’s Choice Award, and to land in the top 8 during the (virtual) 2020 National Competition.

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.

15 Ways to Leverage the C3 Community to Accelerate Consciousness and Your Career

 

In 6 months, Lawrence and I grew the C3: Corporate Consciousness Co-op Community to over 100 people, and we’re still growing.

This group’s vision was to put together leaders who have individually created their own ripples to elevate corporations’ consciousness and recognize that by working together, these ripples become larger, faster, and more powerful waves of transformation.

It’s for those who share a sense of urgency about how quickly we as a planet need to outpace technology, climate change, and greed before we destroy ourselves. 2020 was the largest global challenge we’ve experienced in our lifetime, but there is every reason to believe that other, perhaps greater, challenges lie ahead. We need leaders willing to sacrifice popularity and security for effectiveness in creating change.

The C3 community is not for wish-makers but action-takers. We are in it for the mutual value we are creating. Not only do we get to go further and faster together, but we also get to promote our own initiatives to garner more significant support. We get to support our counterparts’ professional endeavors to help them get further on their journey, as well.

Our goal for 2021 is to expand this group while maintaining quality, which we will measure by engagement. We don’t just want any members who request to join. We want those who are willing to participate and willing to add value.

Once you are in the community, you’ll be invited to engage in a few different ways. We’ll also use these guidelines to assess our engagement and growth success.

Introduce yourself. Reintroduce yourself.

Once your membership is approved, you will be welcomed, tagged, and asked to let the community know what topics and practices related to conscious leadership that you like to speak on. When you do this, your topics are truncated down to 30 characters and are added to our topics poll. This past month we had so many topics we split them into 3 polls and down to a final poll. Topics that have votes (or relevance/timeliness in their favor) are carried over to the next month, but they won’t always, especially as we expand.

If you were an original member, you might have only introduced yourself to a few people, whereas now there are over 100! So hop back on and reintroduce yourself! You may have also thought about other niche topics you want to speak on. Go ahead and share!

We aren’t threatening to delete anyone right now, but because of our engagement goals and our commitment to filling this community with co-creating action-takers, we may eventually do some house cleaning. Don’t just be a passive observer. Stay active and add value!

Read other people’s introductions

None of us have reached complete conscious leadership enlightenment, yet we all have valuable expertise. Someone right here in the community may be an expert in something that you are struggling with right now. As long as we maintain the group’s quality by ensuring that members are all committed to the same thing, co-creation, expect a warm reception to an invitation to exchange expertise. Follow up when you receive such an invitation, as well.

Vote in event topic polls

Vote for yourself or vote for someone else. Just vote! The point of voting is to ensure that our content co-creation is what you desire, even demand, based on what challenges are relevant to you in your conscious leadership journey. On the other hand, say you really want to hear about a topic, but you know you won’t be available on the first Thursday of the month at 1 PM ET, vote for another topic.

Did you refer someone into C3 because you knew that the community would add value to them and vice versa? Vote for them! Remember that a vote for a topic is also a vote for a member.

Spread the word

As I’ve said, we are not interested in growth alone. We do not want to dilute our community with people who are not practicing and promoting conscious leadership. We don’t want people who are more interested in serving their own brand interests than contributing to the movement.

If you know someone who sees issues in the corporate world that we cannot continue to facilitate, wants to serve better and is willing to reach their hand out, they are who we want in this community! We want to combine our expertise and knowledge, and help bring new people into the movement to change the way we work in the corporate world! Send them this link: http://bit.ly/LI_C3

Attend the events and comment/ask questions

Lawrence knows what he’s doing on Streamyard! He makes the radio operator in me proud, watching him keep his thumb on the conversation while also posting relevant links and tracking the comments. All while highlighting the nuggets of wisdom and thought-provoking questions of our audience. We would love to see expansion in participation and conversation-starting questions during these events!

Several of our panelists started as people who were engaging in the events! Visibility is part of the value we intend to provide to you, your experience, and your expertise. We create a safe space for people to share a different perspective. We believe that this is completely necessary if we are to achieve consciousness in the workplace.

Watch the replays

Each month, I list the questions we answered or even questions that beg for more answers. If you go down that list and find anything curious, go back and check it out! Let’s keep the conversation going in the comments. Share your thoughts and reflections. Share your tips!

Share the event summaries

The event summaries are meant to entice anyone in C3 who didn’t attend to watch. These summaries are also shared across social media to drive like-minded professionals to the group. Share it either individually to people who would appreciate the insights or publicly on your own social media pages (with relevant audiences).

Engage with us on Clubhouse and Twitter

Lawrence and I are everywhere, but there are a few places where we include the flow of our daily lives. We have collectively and individually created some ancillary outreach to continue finding new conscious co-creators for our community.

Every other Tuesday at 1:15, Lawrence (@bossllab) and I (@ripplemaker) jump off our telesummit strategy call and into a Clubhouse room. We talk about the tenets of conscious leadership and crowdsource ideas for keynotes and breakouts. If you are on this platform, follow us both and put our next event, March 9th, on your calendar. We’re talking about psychological safety and whatever else seems important to discuss.

This Wednesday at 11 AM ET, I’m re-starting Twitter Chats, at least experimentally. I’d like to see what the Twitterverse has to say about conscious leadership. Find the chat by searching #ConsciousLeaderChat just before 11 AM. You can also follow me @EpicCareering and engage from my profile tweet.

Share relevant articles/blogs – even your own – just ask a thoughtful question

The problem with many of the other groups for practitioners I am in is that it becomes a blog dumping ground. Everyone shares their blog, and no one engages. I mean, post after post with no engagement, not even likes!

For this reason, many group managers have prohibited promoting external links at all.

We are pro-promotion, which is rare. And, we get where these group managers are coming from, as well. When you share a post or article, start a discussion or ask a question, be sure to tag people with relevant experience and ask them to share their opinions or experiences.

Invite other members to connect

Connecting obviously makes it easier to co-create. As an OG LinkedIn trainer, I encourage you to add a note and explain your intentions. Mention the C3 community. If we manage this community right, you will find warm receptions to these invitations.

Promote your event

Do you know of other groups or organizations’ conscious leadership events? Let us know! Knowledge-share is yet another critical value of this community.

Attend someone’s event

When you see an event posted, and you have the time available, go. Engage. Let people know what we’re doing here. Bring a few great people back with you, especially insightful speakers. Talk up the C3 member who is hosting or speaking. Share with us a summary of the event. Give those of us who couldn’t attend an overview of what we missed and pieces of value!

Co-create a new event

We don’t have a monopoly on events in C3. If another topic is in demand, and you are an expert in that topic, create a new event. Even better, consider co-creating that event with some of the people who also voted for it. You can host it and invite others to be panelists, or you can ask someone else to host so that you can be a panelist and bring in other panelists – or not. We have found that we have tremendously enjoyable and valuable banter with 4 perspectives contributing, but that’s not a rule.

Give us more ideas

Most other LinkedIn groups that I am in are not very active. On the other hand, many of the Facebook groups I am in are very active, yet the group I created (Raising Corporate Consciousness) had nearly no engagement over several months. If you see other groups doing things to nurture co-creation, engagement, and value, please let us know about it.

If you see a post or event outside the group you feel is worth mimicking, post it yourself. We are not here to hog the spotlight; quite the opposite. We are here to elevate YOU!

Volunteer

With more ideas, we’ll need more volunteers to help support execution. With more volunteers, we can do more events and highlight more of our members. There are already ideas on the table for which we could use man/woman power, for instance – a structured mentor program.

There are gaps in our ability to engage on all platforms to promote the C3 community and our value. We are a part of many other platforms such as Slack, Quora, and Reddit. If you are savvy with any of these platforms, let us know. We can talk about how you can leverage the time you are already spending to add value to the community while also using the community to add value to your career and conscious leadership momentum.

Future Vision:

As of now, there is no monetization for this group. In fact, Lawrence and I engage our assistants’ help to help us manage the administration and promotion of this group, so it’s operating at a cost. This means we do not have a budget to pay for speakers.

However, stay tuned for an announcement about a June telesummit. This will be an event born from the C3 community that illuminates the thought-leadership, expertise, and value of its members.

C3 won’t be the best-kept secret forever, and the odds of having your topic chosen as our monthly topic will go down as membership goes up.

Take advantage of being a charter member of this group. Consider yourself at the forefront of this wave of conscious corporate change we are co-creating.

Amongst The Waves

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music GroupAmongst The Waves · Pearl JamBackspacer℗ 2009 Monkeywrench, Inc.Released on: 2009-09-20Producer: Brenden O’BrienC…

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Karen Huller is the creator of the Corporate Consciousness Ripple Blueprint and author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days. She founded Epic Careering, a leadership and career development firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, in 2006. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. Her solutions incorporate breakthroughs in neuroscience, human performance optimization, bioenergetics, and psychology to help leaders accelerate rapport, expand influence, and elevate engagement and productivity while also looking out for the sustainability of the business and the planet.

Mrs. Huller was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She was an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) where some of her students won the 2018 national YEA competition, were named Ernst & Young’s America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs, and won the 2019 People’s Choice Award. 

She is board secretary for the Upper Merion Community Center and just finished serving as Vice President of the Gulph Elementary PTC, for which she received recognition as a Public Education Partner and Promoter from the Upper Merion Area Education Association. She lives in King of Prussia with her husband, two daughters, and many pets, furry, feathered, and scaly.