Archives for July 2019

When You Are Advised to Network, But Feel Network-Disabled

“Maybe you need new friends.” Have your parents or other authority figures ever said that to you?

What happened to inspire that advice? Usually, it’s because you told them it was your friends’ idea to do something stupid. When you’re a kid, doing what your friends are doing makes you popular. But we grow out of that, right? Not according to data.

According to data we earn, eat, and generally do what our 5 closest relations earn, eat, and do. 

When I was a recruiter, this was used as justification to always ask top candidates for referrals – good talent runs in packs, apparently. However in the real world working with rising, thriving, and even dying corporate stars, not everyone feels particularly akin to their closest circle of influences. Some even pride themselves on being the black sheep.  For most others, however, being the black sheep is isolating and creates challenges, particularly networking challenges when it comes to making career moves. 

Even though some of these clients were top performers and great team contributors, they shied away from inter-office friendships and social activities. In their private life, they had smaller social circles and preferred low-key, private gatherings to un-traversed, public adventures. 

They were happy to surround themselves with people who know and accept them, introverts and extraverts alike. Not all of them felt the need to change anything until it came time to campaign for a career change (moving up, over, or out.) 

Some coaches I have paid over the years have advised me and many others to cut people out of your life who hold you back or weigh you down. I think this is awful, even dangerous advice. Success that requires you to cut people out of your life sounds too cultish and elitist to me. Yes, sometimes we change and grow, which can cause conflicts with people who have known us as we have been. Sometimes we do outgrow relationship. Sometimes people are genuinely toxic and you need separation. 

Let’s go back to the main point our parents usually got around to making: If your friends were jumping off a bridge, would you?

Friends aren’t the real reasons we stay stagnant in our lives or our careers. Once we get to age 18, family is no longer a reason we can legitimately use to say why we stay stagnant, even if we stay in the same location for their sake. 

Can friends and family influence us? Sure, if we let them, but we let them influence us because, ultimately, we choose. The tighter we make our circle, the harder it is to recognize their influence on our decisions and our path. 

Before I tell you about the light on the other side, I should share with you my personal triumph:

I was severely friendship-disabled during 3-8th grade. I preferred reclusively sitting home and watching television because socializing hurt, sometimes physically. All interactions with peers could easily transgress into a “social suicide” situation. I had to outgrow and overcome this. I did this by diversifying my friend pool. Doing this helped me in multiple ways I could not have expected. It started as a way to have a friend to call when there was drama with my best friend and her other friends. I started doing new things my other “friends” weren’t doing, like tennis camp. I made a friend at tennis camp. She introduced me to other friends, many of whom were going through similar home situations – divorce, shared custody. My best friend could sympathize with this but really didn’t understand like my new friends did. In fact, she and my four other friends from that group still have parents who are alive and still married. 

My new friends shared some of the same anger and pain, and I felt safe talking about it with them. They gave me new ways to deal with it, even how to use it to my advantage. Hanging out with this group changed me a bit – I got/talked tougher and started smoking. My best friend didn’t like the changes so much, but I gained more confidence and stuck up for myself more. This new group also helped me appreciate my individuality. For the most part, I was the “Bomar” of each group, a word we used for studious bookworms who loved to participate in class and generally earned good grades. They didn’t shame me for this like my older group of friends – they admired it. Eventually, I expanded my sphere of influence and even became a “joiner” in high school – athletics, school clubs, yearbook and prom committee, etc.  I also found that my guy friends were a lot more fun with less drama, usually. I spent more time with them and enjoyed being the girl in the group. This came in handy when I started working at a sports apparel retail store working mostly with men talking mostly about professional athletes, and even getting to meet a few. This also helped when I worked in other male-dominated fields, like tech. 

The cumulative effect of having diverse groups of friends is that I can work with difficult personalities successfully, but never feel like I have to continue associating with anyone who mistreats me or whose values are not aligned with mine. I have tried and adopted new hobbies, traveled to new places, and can relate to more people. I meet fewer and fewer people now with whom I can’t find something in common, and that’s a good starting place for rapport, mediation, and negotiations. 

I didn’t leave anyone behind, but some groups grew closer while I expanded my horizons. I became a “special appearance” friend. I wasn’t always where they were, which actually saved me from being arrested on multiple occasions. I still have multiple groups of close friends from high school. We made different decisions at graduation, and we all mostly wound up successful in our careers. We all eventually expanded our circles to include new people – neighbors, sports parents, co-workers, spouse/partner’s friends and in-laws, etc.  

I’m certain that if you take a look at the years since you were in grade school, you would see an evolution in your social sphere as well. 

Some people choose to delineate the social sphere from the professional sphere.  That’s a personal choice and one I didn’t make for myself because of the richness of opportunity that has come from cross-pollinating my professional and personal networks. In fact, I can say with utter certainty that if I had made the attempt to keep my personal and professional circles separate I would have failed at my jobs and in my business. 

If you are choosing this for yourself, this blog is not for you and I really don’t think I can help you get where you want to go. In fact, you’d be hard-pressed to find a career or leadership coach that will help you get where you want to go in your career under the conditions that you continue to only associate with people on either a personal or professional level and never bleed the two together. I do encourage you to start your own society of people who follow the same belief system and maybe you can ONLY help each other based on what you learn about each other professionally. You do you!

Back to the other readers who saw this headline and thought, “Yes – that’ me. I’m network-disabled.” The first step is identifying this. Right now, I want you to know that if you recognize that this has been holding you back from enjoying opportunities for greater professional growth and performance, your network is not permanently broken. You can enjoy expanding your social spheres and spheres of professional influence simultaneously while expanding your comfort zone and discovering new strengths and qualities. It doesn’t take as much time as you think. You could be the new “Norm” to your new Cheers within a few weeks, actually. 

In the coming weeks, I’ll share advice and tips that will help you maximize your victories, minimize and learn from your failures, and accelerate your ability to leverage your new-found friends without feeling sleazy or self-serving.

 

Cheers intro song

intro song to the tv show cheers( 1983-1992) song: where everybody knows your name, by Gary Portnoy.

Karen Huller, author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days (bit.ly/GetFocusIn30), is founder of Epic Careering, a corporate consulting and career management firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, as well as JoMo Rising, LLC, a workflow gamification company that turns work into productive play. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. 

Karen was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends in hiring and careering. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She is an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and previously was an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is also an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy where her students won the 2018 national competition and were named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs.

 

LinkedIn is Hiding it’s Best Features

 

I’ve noticed over the 16 years as a LinkedIn user that, though LinkedIn has and offers some of the best practices, sometimes its interface doesn’t make following those best practices intuitive. In fact, some of its best features are hidden.

Cases in point:

1. Personalizing invitations

LinkedIn’s Quick Help resources advise and warn you: “To uphold LinkedIn’s trusted community, we encourage you to only connect with people you know. By sending fewer and more thoughtful invitations, you can help us keep LinkedIn a trusted space for everyone… We’ve found that most people ignore invitations from people they don’t know. A large number of rejected invitations could result in limitations on your LinkedIn account.”

Then, on another page, it tells you how to personalize your invitation, but doesn’t tell you that many people ignore boilerplate invitations. When I mean many, I mean that I personally know hiring managers, other LinkedIn experts, other career services professionals, executives, and speakers/authors who all intentionally ignore invitations without a personalized message.

(Here are 4 great reasons to ALWAYS personalize your invitation.)

Yet the easier thing to do is click connect. You have to click again on “Add a note” to personalize your message. On the phone apps, the ability to send a personalized invitation took a surprisingly long time to become a feature. It was hidden for a while, and now it’s more visible, but still just under “Connect,” which sends a boilerplate invitation.  Importing your other contact lists sends a generic invitation in bulk.

Every…single…expert will tell you to ALWAYS personalize your invitation, and here are four good reasons why. So why wouldn’t sending and personalizing your invitation be the default option?

2. Groups

Groups are one of the most powerful features of LinkedIn that help you increase your visibility, promote your expertise and brand, and engage directly with people who can be new network connections that help you expand your network. There are three ways to get directly to groups from your desktop homepage, but none of them are obvious. LinkedIn only points out one of them. The other is by using the search bar, but groups usually show up last among the search results (this is the only way I have found to get to groups from the iPhone app.) The third is the 9-dot “work” drop-down in the upper right corner.

 

3. Knowing your contacts

LinkedIn says, ”We recommend only inviting people you know and trust because 1st-degree connections are given access to any information you’ve displayed on your profile.” They have taken steps over the years to inhibit super-connectors from expanding their networks unchecked. The LION (LinkedIn Open Networker) subculture has their reasons for accepting all invitations, but once they hit or were imposed with limits, they have to then remove people they don’t know to add people they meet and for whom have genuine reasons to stay connected.  They then had to tell people, “Sorry – I’m at my limit.”

I have openly heard their side, however, I have found that by knowing my network, my efforts to connect with or connect other people are often successful and my network has grown into a healthy community of over 1400. I am “found” by many people (enough for my bandwidth) and my search results are rich with relevant people, even without an upgraded account.  Here are other reasons I have chosen to fill my network with people with whom I have personally interacted and what I do when I receive an invitation from someone I don’t know. As we’ll discuss in a bit, invitations like these are a good sign.

Some of the changes that LinkedIn has made have penalized people who have added too many people. However, they don’t leverage their navigation or user experience to prevent this. You used to have to adjust settings to only allow people you know a certain way to invite you, and when you sent an invitation you used to have to select how you know them. Certain selections would require you to put their e-mail address. However, people have multiple e-mail addresses and not all of them may be connected to your LinkedIn account. This might be why this is gone, or it could be because the super-connected LIONs are connected enough to be a threat and have successfully influenced interface design to make it easy to connect with anyone, whether you know them or not.

Sidebar: You’ll find Steven Burda and Jason Alba, both quoted in the article linked above on LIONs, in my network because I have had real-world interactions with both of them. In fact, Steven was my neighbor. Our daughters are in girl scouts together. Jason and I connected years ago about his job searching software. I was the 2nd guest on his podcast, Ask the Experts.

4. Stats

Whether you have a free or upgraded account, LinkedIn shows you how many people viewed your profile and posts. Views alone, however, are not a great way to measure the effectiveness of your profile content or activities on LinkedIn for what you probably want to achieve – professional opportunity. What is more relevant is how many invitations you receive in proportion to profile views. This will tell you if your profile brand and content is compelling. This is a quantitative measurement, but qualitatively, if you want to know if your brand is effective, evaluate how well the people who invite you align with your target audience(s) and profiles.

Something else LinkedIn will show you in notifications is when people interact with your dynamic content – status updates, posts and comments. It will show you, again, how many views, but with each interaction that takes a bit more effort, you can see how effective your posts are at increasing your visibility (because more engagement means more visibility as other people’s networks will see their activity in relation to your post and it may even show up on other people’s home feeds as a result), promoting your expertise, and engaging with people who have a high probability of adding value to your professional goals, as well as the goals of your other connections. Likes are the easiest to give. LinkedIn has now added other reactions (that sometimes don’t work for me) and takes just slightly more effort. Commenting, now that LinkedIn has autosuggestions, takes about as much effort, but obviously making a custom comment requires thoughtfulness – a large increase in effort. Tagging others doesn’t take as much effort, but is a great testament to the value of your content and does an even better job of increasing views of your content. Again, though, more views without engagement can be more of a sign of content that could use improvement, such as a call to action.

LinkedIn will count post and status update comments, but remember to evaluate your qualitatively as well.  Analyze your results so that you can continue to improve how your content and activity supports your professional objectives.

What are some great LinkedIn features that aren’t so obvious?

 

You’ve got to hide your love away – The Beatles (LYRICS/LETRA) [Original]

THE INSTRUMENTS IN THIS SONG ARE FROM THE MOST HONORABLE RIOHEY KANAYAMA PLEASE SUSCRIBE TO HIM: https://www.youtube.com/user/goldmine196909 If you liked this song, I invite you to listen the rest of Beatles songs subtitled into english and spanish, following the link below: ► https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qyPusDodDk&list=PL632iTavofD48JGlFY4VkYDKxoWfX17a1 TAGS: You’ve got to hide your love away, the beatles,, the beatles You’ve got to hide your love away, los beatles, os beatles, the beatles lyrics, los beatles letra, o beatles legendado, beatles, beatles john lennon, beatles paul mccartney, beatles ringo starr, beatles george harrison, yoko ono

Karen Huller, author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days (bit.ly/GetFocusIn30), is founder of Epic Careering, a corporate consulting and career management firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, as well as JoMo Rising, LLC, a workflow gamification company that turns work into productive play. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. 

Karen was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends in hiring and careering. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She is an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and previously was an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is also an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy where her students won the 2018 national competition and were named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs.

Why Using a Flip Phone Could Be Bad For Your Career

Last week we talked about a few of the top soft skills in demand by employers, a few them related to being able to succeed and thrive in spite of conditions like constant change.

Looking ahead, all companies have to prepare and plan for a future where workforces and cultures are built to be agile, but where does this leave the workforce demographics that find change hard?

Before I go further, are you attributing this quality to a particular demographic – one based on socio-economic status, race, gender or age?

That’s a bias, and one that should be easily refutable. Millennials and Gen Zers are thought to be more technically savvy and adaptable, however, it’s hard to go a week in my world without someone complaining about them, who by the way are NOT entry level anymore; many are already managers themselves. The complaints essentially have to do with their inability to be open to criticism, coaching, and wisdom, which are all reflections of resistance to change. Other complaints have to do with a lack of accountability and self-management, attributed to a “participation trophy” upbringing. This, too, is still a reflection of resistance to change.

Bias is the reason for this article. Humans do it. Companies do it. I’m not saying it’s right, but it is natural.

The truth is that all human beings are hard-wired to find change hard; it’s a defense mechanism built into our primitive brain to help us be wary and hyper-alert to potential danger in new situations. We also have more evolved parts of our brains that help us adapt and assimilate to new environments, but not without being uncomfortable, or even downright stressed.

Not all stress is bad, but our culture and media isn’t reinforcing this, and certainly human beings are not built to stay in stress response for sustained and chronic periods of time. People aren’t dying of old age; they’re dying from disease, many of which are traced back to stress.  This can impact any age, race, creed, etc. However it’s the aged population who are the most at risk for serious health impacts; they’ve been responding to stress for more years, and not all are getting better at managing it. In fact, the pace of change, especially in the workplace, can be understandably overwhelming.

The recruiter’s objective in simple terms is to identify value and assess risks of qualified candidates. This is, by law, NOT supposed to take into consideration health, age, race, or creed. However, they can and need to be able to assess how well an employee will perform, collaborate, and develop in accordance with the company’s business operations and plans. Adaptability, as reported in last week’s blog, is fast becoming one of the top soft qualities in-demand.

The challenge is, as with any soft quality, it’s nearly impossible to narrow down a candidate pool based on soft qualities, and unless the candidate has effectively branded themselves as adaptable and provided hard evidence, a résumé and LinkedIn profile will not make adaptability obvious. Recruiters have to look for “signs” of adaptability. This could look like working in diverse technology environments, getting promoted at a rapid pace, evolving with a fast-growing company, working for companies known for being on the bleeding edge, or assimilating to different cultures.

On the other hand, recruiters in their attempt to assess risk may perceive certain things as signs of a lack of adaptability, which may or may not be an accurate way of assessing adaptability and future-readiness, but it’s just another thing that makes hiring and recruiting ripe for disruption.

I remember hearing last decade that “anyone wearing a watch was definitely 40+.” At the time I wanted to be perceived as more mature, so I bought and started wearing a watch. It seems superficial and trivial to me now, and an even more dangerous indication of harmful bias that leaves room for discrimination.  Now I’m hearing, “If someone still has a flip phone they are stuck in the past.” This is also a sign of bias. Someone might use a flip phone because they won’t be distracted by it, and have other means, like a tablet or iPad, of getting other things done.

Back then I would have given candidates concerned about age discrimination to make themselves appear more youthful by accommodating such statements.  Now, with 13 years of success with my clients and unflappable confidence that you can put yourself in a position where YOU have the power of choice over where you land, my advice is to demonstrate adaptability using authentic means. Don’t buy into the bias. You’ll just end up fighting it regularly on the job, and that will diminish your job and perhaps your effectiveness.

Show off the diversity of technologies you have learned and applied

  • Work in internationally immersive experiences to your branded content
  • Tell stories about changes you have championed (mention the business cases and results)
  • Comment on or write articles or LinkedIn posts about emerging trends and technologies
  • Attend conferences and interface with people on the front end of industry disruption
  • Adopt new habits and learn a new skill; it doesn’t even have to be work-related, but will demonstrate your hunger for growth
  • Get out of your comfort zone at least once a week; you may fail at something new, but you’ll have new stories to tell and insights to share

So, using a flip phone can be detrimental in that you may not be considered by a company who perceives it as a sign of resistance to change and progress. However, that company has some progress to make of their own raising awareness about biases, and that’s not your burden to bear.

Aimee Mann – Stuck In The Past (Live on KEXP)

http://KEXP.ORG presents Aimee Mann performing “Stuck In The Past” live in the KEXP studio. Recorded July 17, 2017. Host: Stevie Zoom Audio Engineer: Chris Bailey & Kevin Suggs Cameras: Scott Holpainen, Jeff Wenzel & Justin Wilmore Editor: Justin Wilmore http://kexp.org http://aimeemann.com

Karen Huller, author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days (bit.ly/GetFocusIn30), is founder of Epic Careering, a corporate consulting and career management firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, as well as JoMo Rising, LLC, a workflow gamification company that turns work into productive play. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. 

Karen was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends in hiring and careering. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She is an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and previously was an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is also an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy where her students won the 2018 national competition and were named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs.

What’s Easier – Hire For or Train On Soft Skills

Technology can be intimidating, but it isn’t going anywhere. Before technology was a mainstay in corporate America, loyalty, knowing your job really well, and working hard were top values. Now working smart is how people get more done in less time. Loyalty isn’t something expected or given; companies spend billions of dollars in hopes of engaging and retaining their talent. And just when you get to know your job, new technology implementations and process improvements are sure to come along and change how your job gets done.

Change is a constant, and the qualities employers value most is reflective of the accelerating pace of change. Making the top qualities list are things like emotional intelligence, accountability, adaptability, resilience, and entrepreneurial skills, but what does all that mean and how do employers identify and evaluate talent for these?

It’s no secret that no one’s figured out how to do a perfect job of finding, recruiting, hiring and onboarding talent. It’s one of the many broken systems we keep looking for technology to fix. In fact, HR tech is already an $8B market. Much like every other space, it’s struggling to keep pace with evolving workforce demands and technology.

No algorithm has yet been developed to help companies pluck emotionally intelligent, resilient, entrepreneurial, adaptable talent from databases filled with résumés that barely have the right keywords let alone the right evidence of such qualities.

So, companies, for the most part, are stuck pre-screening for years of experience, minimum education requirements, and hard skills that may or may not be success indicators and probably will evolve and change over the next few years anyway. Then they evaluate a smaller pool of candidates for such qualities in the interview process, probably leaving some really great candidates completely out of the process.

Why are soft skills more valued than skills these days (according to 57% of leaders on LinkedIn)?

Emotional intelligence is a frequent topic of Epic Careering blogs. That’s because a more emotionally intelligent workforce means fewer brand-breaking headlines, less emotional toxicity in the workplace, and limited money and time spent on employee relation mitigation. It also means more client-focused solutions that are marketed and sold better, increased collaboration for faster innovation, and a better ability to foresee how decisions will impact people, planet, and profits in the long-term.

Resilience hasn’t made many of the lists I see published, but it is something that I have had many leaders articulate to me as a highly valued skill, especially in a high growth and/or start-up environment. Defined as meaning an ability to recover quickly from difficulties. Sometimes companies lose key clients, have to downsize, get acquired, and have new leadership take over. Resilience doesn’t mean having no emotional response to such change; it means quickly getting over the emotional reaction and restoring the mindset for performance and problem-solving.

Change management is a growing field, which reflects that there is a greater awareness that change can have adverse impacts on performance, morale, and even health. It reflects a recognition that human beings, by nature, are resistant to change. However, some people, the more adaptable ones, find change easier, even exciting. A more adaptable workforce means less time and money spent on mitigating the impact of change on an organization. Having influential change enthusiasts at various levels in the organization will make it easier for the organization as a whole to move forward. Regardless of the chaos that change can create, adaptable people will find opportunity.

Accountability is huge! I have seen interview coaches goad job seekers into believing that recruiters ask certain questions as traps to get candidates to disqualify themselves by asking about negative experiences and bad choices. Mistakenly, these candidates will try to avoid telling any negative story and evade the truth. This is an awful interview performance tactic. Not only does it shift a person’s non-verbal communication from confident to defensive, it also shifts the interviewee-interviewer relationship from potentially collegial to adversarial and precludes this candidate from demonstrating accountability – taking responsibility for mistakes, and even more importantly, learning and growing from them. Failure is necessary to innovate. Cy Wakeman has also accurately asserted that if employers try to be accountable for each employee’s happiness and engagement, you get an entitled workforce and no improvements in engagement. Not only will a company waste less time on emotional toxicity if everyone took accountability for their own mistakes as well as their own happiness, but it will also nurture a more self-managed culture. I know many great leaders who feel their efforts to enhance working conditions and engagement have been taken for granted and fear that their teams, especially younger team members with little “real world” experience, think that perks, good benefits, continued training, and flexibility are standard and the minute unfavorable conditions exist it’s time to find greener pastures. What the leaders know is that good leaders are definitely NOT a dime a dozen, but if they let their team members find out for themselves, right behind them will be more entitled workers, because accountability for one’s own happiness is so rare.

Speaking of self-managed, entrepreneurialism is a quality that many companies are still feeling out. Consensus among those not yet in management is that management could use improving. Across the board, managers can do better at managing. However, there is an implication that if you are entrepreneurial minded, you won’t need oversight or supervision. This can be mistaken for not needing mentorship and leadership or even communication. I believe when companies say they are looking for someone entrepreneurial they might mean they want someone who will deliver promptly without prompts, someone who will be resourceful in solving problems, and someone who can keep track of multiple functions or balls in the air.  An entrepreneurial person is someone who will offer no excuses. They’ll make it work, like Tim Gunn. Workarounds aren’t ideal for sustainable innovation, but they are often critical for helping emerging industries and technologies survive while new designs are tested. All companies have to be wary of making the temporary workaround the permanent procedure, as it leaves room for disruption and obsolescence.

Almost every leader will tell you that talent is one of their biggest challenges – finding, training, keeping and engaging it. On one side, there are leaders who will tell you that they can train on skill and would rather hire someone with the soft skills to succeed, while others have not figured out how to find talent if not for qualifying on hard skills and then further qualifying for soft skills.

Either way, the challenge will remain, talent pools will remain small, even in times of high unemployment, as long as people without the right combination of strong soft skills are excluded from consideration. For instance, Sally is a charming, persuasive storyteller, but she is unreliable.  She rarely shows up to meetings with clients on time and is often late in delivering what is promised. She is as much a liability as an asset. Can she be trained to be on time and better at time management? Yes! She and the company would be exponentially more successful if she were trained/coached.

Frustrated job seekers everywhere are scratching their heads… How could it be that so many companies struggle to find the right talent, but when you are talent, you get passed over and dismissed so frequently and seemingly trivially?

There are a lot of things that could be done better to connect talent with the companies who need it (much of which Epic Careering is taking on, as it’s our mission to bridge this gap.) Candidates can take it upon themselves to develop better soft skills, but it’s not as cut and dry as to where and how one should go about doing that. Would enough talented corporate rising stars do this to widen the talent pool? It could happen, but it would take quite the campaign. You can help by sharing our blogs related to soft skills, like this, or inviting us to speak.

The other thing that companies can do is to make soft skills development as much a part of their training and development budget as upgrading technical skills. Employees at every level would benefit from soft skills development, and the company would see a vast improvement in multiple metrics categories, though some short-term fall off of uncoachable employees would be expected.

Wouldn’t it be great if in the next 5 years employers could qualify potential talent based on whether or not they successfully completed and applied soft skills training? Then the pool can be further qualified by hard skills. Or, to keep the candidate pool wide when necessary, companies can hire for soft skills and train on hard skills. A workforce trained in soft skills by ways of certain mindfulness trainings also enhance the learning state and help develop neural pathways that make learning, retention and recall even better. This workforce will be even more willing and able to learn and apply new breakthroughs and technologies as they become available.

Until then, the workaround is to offer soft skills training to your workforce related to these primary qualities in conjunction with hard skills training.

If you are interested in evaluating this kind of soft skills training, book a consultation with us today.

We’d love to know how your company has worked around the soft skills shortage.

Jerry Whitman – Too Bad You’re Crazy

The Ending Song From April Fools’ Day (1986).

Karen Huller, author of Laser-sharp Career Focus: Pinpoint your Purpose and Passion in 30 Days (bit.ly/GetFocusIn30), is founder of Epic Careering, a corporate consulting and career management firm specializing in executive branding and conscious culture, as well as JoMo Rising, LLC, a workflow gamification company that turns work into productive play. 

While the bulk of her 20 years of professional experience has been within the recruiting and employment industry, her publications, presentations, and coaching also draw from experience in personal development, performance, broadcasting, marketing, and sales. 

Karen was one of the first LinkedIn trainers and is known widely for her ability to identify and develop new trends in hiring and careering. She is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Certified Career Transition Consultant, and Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist with a Bachelor of Art in Communication Studies and Theater from Ursinus College and a minor in Creative Writing. Her blog was recognized as a top 100 career blog worldwide by Feedspot. 

She is an Adjunct Professor in Cabrini University’s Communications Department and previously was an Adjunct Professor of Career Management and Professional Development at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business  She is also an Instructor for the Young Entrepreneurs Academy where her students won the 2018 national competition and were named America’s Next Top Young Entrepreneurs.